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Spiritual Awareness => Toad Stool Memories; Sacred Places, Times, Objects, Mother Earth and Creation => Topic started by: tides2dust on Oct 07, 2010 09:29 pm



Title: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 07, 2010 09:29 pm
It is a very high stage on the path of love when a man really learns to love another with a love that asks no return.

     Bowl of Saki, October 7, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date_pic.php

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Origins of "The Bowl of Saki" and the Daily Commentary


Background:

The title The Bowl of Saki was chosen around 1921 by students of Hazrat Inayat Khan who published a book containing some of the inspiring phrases that they had been given by their teacher. The first edition of The Bowl of Saki was published in England in late 1921 or early 1922.

The Bowl of Saki is a compendium of 366 brief quotations, one for each day of the year, selected from the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan. Many of the quotes came directly from his lectures, while others came from his personal notebooks. In the December 1921 edition of the quarterly publication "Sufism", the new book was announced as:

    "a collection of some of the most striking and arresting sayings of Pir-o-Murshid, arranged in the form of a daily textbook"

        from Complete Works of Pir-o-Murshid Hazrat Inayat Khan, Original Texts: Sayings, Part II


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The Word Saki:

The Arabic word sāqī ساقی (also written as saqi or saki) literally means wine-server or wine-pourer and is frequently used in Persian poetry to describe the glorious Server who continually pours out the wine everlasting to all of mankind, while implying that only a completely empty bowl is truly ready to be filled with such a fine wine. For the Sufi, the greatest task of life is to become empty enough, selfless enough, to be a suitable receptacle for the wine which the Sāqī  pours.

In some cases, the word sāqī   may be used as a reference to a specific spiritual teacher, but in the grand scheme of things, a spiritual teacher is merely a worldly symbol for the presence of the Beloved, the One and Only One.

Some say that in order to be grammatically correct, the title should have been written as "The Bowl of the Sāqī," but frankly that title is rather clumsy and lacks poetry... so, perhaps the present title The Bowl of Saki was never intended to be grammatically correct, but may instead be a playful bit of British humor that intertwines the mystical Persian imagery with the thought of the oriental rice wine that has a similar sounding name. It is doubtful that we will ever know exactly how the book title The Bowl of Saki was created, but really the more important matter is to understand the deep significance of the word sāqī and of the bowl, which might also be called a cup, or chalice.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_origins.htm

The the term "The Bowl of Saki" is explained in a slightly different context in the following words of Hazrat Inayat Khan discussing the power of the mystical glance:

    Besides its precious work, which makes the eye superior to every other organ of the body, it is the expression of the beauty of body, mind and soul. Sufis, therefore, symbolize the eye by a cup of wine. Through the eyes, the secret hidden in man's heart is reflected into the heart of another. However much a person may try to conceal his secret, yet the reader can read it in his eyes, and can read there his pleasure, his displeasure, his joy, and his sorrow. A seer can see still farther. The seer can see the actual condition of man's soul through his eyes, his grade of evolution, his attitude in life, his outlook on life, and his condition, both hidden and manifest. Besides, to the passive soul of a disciple, knowledge, ecstasy, spiritual joy, and divine peace, all are given through the glance. One sees in everyday life that a person who is laughing in his mind with his lips closed can express his laughter through his glance, and the one who receives the glance at once catches the infectious mirth. Often the same happens through looking in the eyes of the sorrowful, in a moment one becomes filled with depression. And those whose secret is God, whose contemplation is the perfection of beauty, whose joy is endless in the realization of everlasting life, and from whose heart the spring of love is ever flowing, it is most appropriate that their glance should be called, symbolically, the Bowl of Saki, the Bowl of the Wine-Giver.

             from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan, Volume XIII, Naqshi Bandi, The Glance







Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 12, 2010 10:38 pm
Seek Him in all souls, good or bad, wise and foolish, attractive and unattractive; in the depths of each there is God.


Bowl of Saki, October 12, by Hazrat Inayat Khan



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As fruit ripens in the course of nature, so it is in the course of nature that the soul should mature; and it is no use being disappointed or disheartened about ourselves and about those near and dear to us, worrying because our husband, ...wife, father, or mother does not look at spiritual matters in the same way as we do. In the first place no man, however wise or pious, has the right to judge another soul. Who knows what is hidden behind every action, appearance, speech, and manner? No one. And when a person begins to know what is hidden in the human soul, in spite of all deluding appearances he will have respect, a respect for mankind, as he realizes that in the depth of every soul is He whom one worships.

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Man swimming in the sea does not know the fish living in the sea, so we living in God do not recognize all souls living in God also. He is all around and about us at every moment, we are living His life, we are breathing His breath, and yet we are ignorant of the perfection of beauty which unites and inspires every soul.

 :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 17, 2010 11:57 pm
Mysticism to the mystic is both science and religion.

     Bowl of Saki, October 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
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What we generally know as the breath is that little inhaling and exhaling which we feel through the nostrils. We think that is breath and attach little importance to it, while in reality, breath is a life-current running through the innermost part of man's being towards the surface. It would be no exaggeration, according to the mystical point of view, to say that the breath connects heaven and earth. ...

For the mystic, breath is not only a science, but the knowledge of breath is mysticism, and mysticism to the thinker is both science and religion. The mystery of breath is not a thing that can be comprehended by the brain only. The principles of mysticism rise from the heart of man. They are learned by intuition and proved by reason. ...

If we consider the conditions of life today, we see that, however much man thinks he has progressed, certain aspects of life are neglected in the way of health, repose, balanced thinking, and in the way of kindness and love to one another. All these things are lacking, and the spirit of the present time seems to be going in quite the opposite direction.

Selfishness seems to be so much on the increase. Real religion, the spirit of forgiveness, generous giving, regard for old age, refinement, culture -- all seem to be disappearing. Man in general, does not know even if there is a God or Truth. If this is the spirit, how can we expect to find that harmony, peace and love, which make heaven on earth?

It is useless to discuss the peace of the world. What is necessary just now is to create peace in ourselves that we, ourselves, become examples of love, harmony and peace. That is the only way of saving the world and ourselves.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_17.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 26, 2010 09:36 pm
Love is unlimited, but it needs scope to expand and rise; without that scope, life is unhappy.
     Bowl of Saki, December 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote

A person who lives in happy surroundings with luxuries and sources of pleasure and comfort, may be envied and imagined to be a very happy and lucky man. In reality, however, he may be very unhappy. The external world has given him all he wished for, but the inner world, the inner being, is unhappy. There is something absent, and he wants it to be present. There is something missing inwardly. This shows that the inner presence is required. The external presence is not the only comfort.
 
But we may ask, the inner presence of what? Many will say, 'We know we are unhappy sometimes in spite of wealth, comfort, happiness, friends, or beloved.' But, perhaps they will not believe that it is another lack, the lack of a divine ideal that makes them unhappy. Others consider that life requires scope for progress, and that it is the lack of scope that causes the greatest unhappiness. Such persons think that they cannot prosper in the work that they are doing, that they cannot be any better off than the others. Such a thought is worse than death. Life is unlimited, and it wants scope to expand and rise. Without that scope life is unhappy.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_31.htm
 
 
Every kind of power lies in this one thing which we call by the simple name: love. Charity, generosity, kindness, affection, endurance, tolerance, and patience -- all these words are different aspects of one; they are different names of only one thing: love. Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own. Love as kindness is one thing, love as tolerance is another, love as generosity is another, love as patience another; and yet from beginning to end it is just love. ... True love must have free flow; and to learn that free flow the teachers have taught us first to love from the limited, and thence to advance in love till we attain to the love of God, the Unlimited.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm

 :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Dec 26, 2010 10:21 pm
Love is unlimited, but it needs scope to expand and rise; without that scope, life is unhappy.
     Bowl of Saki, December 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
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Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
 
A person who lives in happy surroundings with luxuries and sources of pleasure and comfort, may be envied and imagined to be a very happy and lucky man. In reality, however, he may be very unhappy. The external world has given him all he wished for, but the inner world, the inner being, is unhappy. There is something absent, and he wants it to be present. There is something missing inwardly. This shows that the inner presence is required. The external presence is not the only comfort.
 
But we may ask, the inner presence of what? Many will say, 'We know we are unhappy sometimes in spite of wealth, comfort, happiness, friends, or beloved.' But, perhaps they will not believe that it is another lack, the lack of a divine ideal that makes them unhappy. Others consider that life requires scope for progress, and that it is the lack of scope that causes the greatest unhappiness. Such persons think that they cannot prosper in the work that they are doing, that they cannot be any better off than the others. Such a thought is worse than death. Life is unlimited, and it wants scope to expand and rise. Without that scope life is unhappy.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_31.htm
 
 
Every kind of power lies in this one thing which we call by the simple name: love. Charity, generosity, kindness, affection, endurance, tolerance, and patience -- all these words are different aspects of one; they are different names of only one thing: love. Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own. Love as kindness is one thing, love as tolerance is another, love as generosity is another, love as patience another; and yet from beginning to end it is just love. ... True love must have free flow; and to learn that free flow the teachers have taught us first to love from the limited, and thence to advance in love till we attain to the love of God, the Unlimited.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm
:)


I found these entries very helpful to me and some friends. i hope to find time to read the link as well. Thanks for highlighting the link.

In particular this quote makes me respond: Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own.
When we are on this path towards love we see that every other path, whether slow or fast as it may seem, is a path to that love. It is much better to be conscious of the path we are taking and to find the fastest route for our aspirations. The only way that i know to gauge this is to assess the people, situations and circumstances that come into our lives and the long term affects on our consciousness to express the love we have gained through these conditions. That which is inimical to this process is what we should avoid as much as possible.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on Jan 04, 2011 08:42 am
always thought Saki was a drink, rice wine perhaps ?   8)

got it now ! drink the wine of wisdom

all we need is love, love, love


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 06, 2011 12:13 am
   

No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.


     Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
There is a [Hadith] which says: Mutu kubla anta mutu, which means, 'Die before death.' A poet says, 'Only he attains to the peace of the Lord who loses himself.' God said to Moses, 'No man shall see me and live.' To see God we must be non-existent.

What does all this mean? It means that when we see our being with open eyes, we see that there are two aspects to our being: the false and the true. The false life is that of the body and mind, which only exists as long as the life is within. In the absence of that life the body cannot go on. We mistake the true life for the false, and the false for the true.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_26.htm


As life unfolds itself to man the first lesson it teaches is humility; the first thing that comes to man's vision is his own limitedness. The vaster God appears to him, the smaller he finds himself. This goes on and on until the moment comes when he loses himself in the vision of God. In terms of the Sufis this is called fana, and it is this process that was taught by Christ under the name of self-denial. Often man interprets this teaching wrongly and considers renunciation as self-denial. He thinks that the teaching is to renounce all that is in the world. But although that is a way and an important step which leads to true self-denial, the self-denial meant is the losing oneself in God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


The first lesson of the mystic is, "Thou art, and not I." It is not only complete surrender to God, it is self-effacement. And what does the symbol of the cross explain? That "Thou art, not me, my hands are not for me, my feet are not for me, my head is not for me, they are all Thine." The saying of the [Hadith], "Die before death," does not mean suicide, it means the death of the "I", the separate self.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Mysticism VI", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jan 06, 2011 09:07 pm
   

No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.


     Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
There is a [Hadith] which says: Mutu kubla anta mutu, which means, 'Die before death.' A poet says, 'Only he attains to the peace of the Lord who loses himself.' God said to Moses, 'No man shall see me and live.' To see God we must be non-existent.

What does all this mean? It means that when we see our being with open eyes, we see that there are two aspects to our being: the false and the true. The false life is that of the body and mind, which only exists as long as the life is within. In the absence of that life the body cannot go on. We mistake the true life for the false, and the false for the true.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_26.htm


As life unfolds itself to man the first lesson it teaches is humility; the first thing that comes to man's vision is his own limitedness. The vaster God appears to him, the smaller he finds himself. This goes on and on until the moment comes when he loses himself in the vision of God. In terms of the Sufis this is called fana, and it is this process that was taught by Christ under the name of self-denial. Often man interprets this teaching wrongly and considers renunciation as self-denial. He thinks that the teaching is to renounce all that is in the world. But although that is a way and an important step which leads to true self-denial, the self-denial meant is the losing oneself in God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


The first lesson of the mystic is, "Thou art, and not I." It is not only complete surrender to God, it is self-effacement. And what does the symbol of the cross explain? That "Thou art, not me, my hands are not for me, my feet are not for me, my head is not for me, they are all Thine." The saying of the [Hadith], "Die before death," does not mean suicide, it means the death of the "I", the separate self.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Mysticism VI", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php

Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan inspires non verbal communication and solitude; finding that peace within.

 Steve Hydonus


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Serena Duvet on Jan 08, 2011 03:44 am
No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.

Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan[/i]


Timeless!


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 12, 2011 09:21 am
Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

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When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 26, 2011 09:34 pm
Man is closer to God than the fishes are to the ocean.

     Bowl of Saki, March 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan



Quote
One day Inayat was praying on the roof of the house, offering his prayers and he thought to himself that there had not been an answer yet to all the prayers he had offered to God and he did not know where God was to hear his prayers and he could not reconcile himself to going on praying to the God whom he knew not. He went fearlessly to his father and said: "I do not think I will continue my prayers any longer, for it does not fit in with my reason. I do not know how I can go on praying to a God I do not know." His father, taken aback, did not become cross lest he might turn Inayat's beliefs sour by forcing them upon him without satisfying his reason and he was glad on the other hand to see that, although it was irreverent on the child's part, yet it was frank, and he knew that the lad really hungered after Truth and was ready to learn now, what many could not learn in their whole life.

He said to him: "God is in you and you are in God. As the bubble is in the ocean and the bubble is a part of the ocean and yet not separate from the ocean. For a moment it has appeared as a bubble, then it will return to that from which it has risen. So is the relation between man and God. The Prophet has said that God is closer to you than the jugular vein, which in reality means that your own body is farther from you than God is. If this be rightly interpreted, it will mean that God is the very depth of your own being." This moment to Inayat was his very great initiation, as if a switch had turned in him, and from that moment onward his whole life Inayat busied himself, and his whole being became engaged in witnessing in life what he knew and believed, by this one great Truth.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/bio/Biography_9.htm


The innermost being of man is the real being of God; man is always linked with God. If he could only realize it, it is by finding harmony in his own soul that he finds communion with God. All meditation and contemplation are taught with this purpose: to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light. In that way we are even closer to God than the fishes are to the ocean in which they have their being.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_1.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on Mar 26, 2011 09:39 pm
hey little1 !  8)

thanx for sharing the Bowl of Saki writings !


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: yoshi on Mar 26, 2011 10:21 pm
thank you ((( little1 ))) for sharing with us  :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 27, 2011 05:04 am
by Hazrat Inayat Khan

The innermost being of man is the real being of God; man is always linked with God. If he could only realize it, it is by finding harmony in his own soul that he finds communion with God. All meditation and contemplation are taught with this purpose: to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light.

Thanks for the contribution Eric. Every once in a while i get these glimpses but that is the goal; 'to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light.'


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 04, 2011 03:10 am
Life is a misery for the man absorbed in himself.

     Bowl of Saki, April 3, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
The more living the heart, the more sensitive it is; but that which causes sensitiveness is the love-element in the heart, and love is God. The person whose heart is not sensitive is without feeling; his heart is not living, it is dead. In that case the divine Spirit is buried in his heart. A person who is always concerned with his own feelings is so absorbed in himself that he has no time to think of another. His whole attention is taken up with his own feelings. He pities himself, he worries about his own pain, and is never open to sympathize with others. He who takes notice of the feelings of another person with whom he comes in contact, practices the first essential moral of Sufism.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_3.htm


A person who, alone, has seen something beautiful, who has heard something harmonious, who has tasted something delicious, who has smelt something fragrant, may have enjoyed it, but not completely. The complete joy is in sharing one's joy with others. For the selfish one who enjoys himself and does not care for others, whether he enjoys things of the earth or things of heaven, his enjoyment is not complete.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_29.htm


When a person is absorbed in himself, he has no time for character-building, because he has no time to think of others: then there is no other. But when he forgets himself, he has time to look here and there, to collect what is good and beautiful, and to add it naturally to his character. So the character is built. One need not make an effort to build it, one has only to forget oneself.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_2.htm


Every step in evolution makes life more valuable. The more evolved you are, the more priceless is every moment; it becomes an opportunity for you to do good to others, to serve others, to give love to others, to be gentle to others, to give your sympathy to souls who are longing and hungering for it. Life is miserable when a person is absorbed in himself; as soon as he forgets himself he is happy. The more he thinks of himself, his own affairs, work and interests, the less he knows the meaning of life. When a person looks at another he cannot at the same time look at himself. Illness, disappointments and hardships matter very little when one can look at them from a higher standpoint.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Lucky Denver on Apr 04, 2011 04:42 am
Thank you my friend :)  Indeed, we hear it all the time, and yet the message can not be repeated or stressed enough about giving and selflessness.

One sentence that got me thinking in particular:


Quote
For the selfish one who enjoys himself and does not care for others, whether he enjoys things of the earth or things of heaven, his enjoyment is not complete.

The part that says "whether he enjoys things of earth or things of heaven" got me thinking of a selfishness that is sometimes overlooked.  We all have experienced or known someone who has experienced a selfish love of the things of the earth; some sort of material joy or worldly attachment.  But I have also seen such a thing as a "spiritual" selfishness: a love of things of heaven or spiritual nature, but only with concern for the development and spirituality of the self.  Indeed, there are those out there who look at ascension and higher consciousness as the goal, and yet they have no place or concern for others in those plans; they see their spiritual journey as only regarding themselves.  Indeed, enjoyment is not complete without sharing and care for others!


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 12, 2011 08:22 pm
The ideal of God is a bridge connecting the limited life with the unlimited; whosoever travels over this bridge passes safely from the limited to the unlimited life.

     Bowl of Saki, April 12, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
There is a side in man's being - call it spirit - which remains unsatisfied with all that one has attained in one's lifetime. The satisfaction of the spirit, which is the deepest being of man, lies only in the pursuit of the ideal. With all progress that humanity makes, idealism neglected will show at each step towards progress a great lack, and nothing can substitute that lack. If there is anything that fills the gap, if there is anything that makes a bridge between God and man, it is the ideal.

   ~~~ "The Message Papers, The Message", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


An ideal is something to hope for and to hold on to, and in the absence of an ideal hope has nothing to look forward to. It is the lack of idealism which accounts for the present degeneration of humanity in spite of all the progress it has made in other directions. There are many kinds of ideals: principles, virtues, objects of devotion; but the greatest and highest of all ideals is the God-ideal. And when this God-ideal upon which all other ideals are based is lost, then the very notion of ideal is ignored. Man needs many things in life, but his greatest need is an ideal.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.htm


If a man is standing on a staircase and remains on the first step, he may be a believer but he is not going up. Thus there are many believers who have a certain conception of God, but they are standing there without moving, while perhaps a person who has no conception of God at all may be moving. There are thousands of people who pronounce the name of God many times during the day, but who are perhaps most wretched. The reason is that they have not yet discovered the purpose of the God-ideal. It is not merely belief; belief is only the first step. God is the key to truth, God is the stepping-stone to self-realization, God is the bridge which unites the outer life with the inner life, bringing about perfection. It is by understanding this that the secret of the God-ideal is to be realized.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.htm


The God-ideal is so tremendous that men can never comprehend it fully, therefore the best method adopted by the wise is to allow every man to make his own God. In this way he forms whatever conception he is capable of forming. He makes Him King of the heavens and of the earth; he makes Him judge, greater than all judges; he makes Him Almighty, having all power; he makes Him the possessor of all grace and glory; he makes Him the beloved God, merciful and compassionate; he recognizes in Him providence, support, and protection; and in Him he recognizes all perfection. This ideal becomes a stepping-stone to the higher knowledge of God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.htm
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Lucky Denver on Apr 13, 2011 01:53 am
My dear friend, thank you once again for posting these and keeping our Bowl of Saki full.  I always get excited when I see a new post here, as the messages are always riveting universal sentiments of truth and wisdom.

Particularly loved this quote today:

Quote
The God-ideal is so tremendous that men can never comprehend it fully, therefore the best method adopted by the wise is to allow every man to make his own God. In this way he forms whatever conception he is capable of forming.

I could not agree more and this is what I hope to be able to teach someone in my short time here.  People lose sight of the God-ideal because it is not their own.  They are content to blindly trust what someone ELSE says is at the top of those stairs, whether it is their friend, parent, rabbi, priest, guru, or whoever.. they are told to stay on the first step of that staircase and ponder about, read about, and "just have faith" about where it leads but they are never really told to GO there.  It is sadly all too common that people forget and actually forsake the individual relationship with God for chasing and following what someone else presents as the God-ideal.

Allah is not just around us but is a part of us, a part that is unique and individual and sacred to every one of us.  The only one on this Earth who can bring you to know that part is you, so never settle for taking someone's "word for it" because nobody has the understanding or the right to define your unique one-and-only relationship with Him.

Good day and sweetest blessings to all!!!!!

Love
Lucky


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 17, 2011 08:33 am
It is the surface of the sea that makes waves and roaring breakers; the depth is silent.

     Bowl of Saki, April 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
The bubbles are to be found on the surface of the sea. The depth of the sea is free from bubbles. The commotion is to be seen on the surface, the depth of the sea is still. The mind is the commotion of that something that is within us, that something which we call heart. The happiness, knowledge, pleasure and love that is stored in our innermost being is in our profound depth. Changing emotions and passions, dreams, ever-rising thoughts and imaginations, all belong to the surface, as the bubbles belong to the surface of the sea.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/II/II_41.htm


To attain peace, what one has to do is to seek that rhythm which is in the depth of our being. It is just like the sea: the surface of the sea is ever moving; the depth of the sea is still. And so it is with our life. If our life is thrown into the sea of activity, it is on the surface. We still live in the profound depths, in that peace. But the thing is to become conscious of that peace which can be found within ourselves. It is this which can bring us the answer to all our problems. If not, when we want to solve one problem, there is another difficult problem coming. There is no end to our problems. There is no end to the difficulties of the outer life. And if we get excited over them, we shall never be able to solve them. Some think, 'We might wait. Perhaps the conditions will become better. We shall see then what to do.' But when will the conditions become better? They will become still worse! Whether the conditions become better or worse, the first thing is to seek the kingdom of God within ourselves, in which there is our peace. As soon as we have found that, we have found our support, we have found our self. And in spite of all the activity and movement on the surface, we shall be able to keep that peace undisturbed if only we hold it fast by becoming conscious of it.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_IV_6.htm


Spiritual knowledge is nothing but this: that there is a constant longing in the heart of man to have something of its origin, to experience something of its original state, the state of peace and joy which has been disturbed, and yet is sought after throughout its whole life, and never can cease to be sought after until the real source has at length been realized. What was it in the wilderness that gave peace and joy? What was it that came to us in the forest, the solitude? In either case it was nothing else but the depth of our own life, which is silent like the depths of the great sea, so silent and still. It is the surface of the sea that makes waves and roaring breakers; the depth is silent. So the depth of our own being is silent also.

And this all-pervading, unbroken, inseparable, unlimited, ever-present, omnipotent silence unites with our silence like the meeting of flames. Something goes out from the depths of our being to receive something from there, which comes to meet us; our eyes cannot see and our ears cannot hear and our mind cannot perceive because it is beyond mind, thought, and comprehension. It is the meeting of the soul and the Spirit.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_4.htm
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php?month=4&day=17


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Lucky Denver on Apr 17, 2011 10:25 am
Eric my friend;

Thank you once again for sharing.  I LOVE these!

And may you all, my kindred spirits here, find the depths of the sea, the still of the mind, the peace in your heart.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 15, 2011 12:12 pm
He who is looking for a reward is smaller than his reward; he who has renounced a thing has risen above it.

     Bowl of Saki, May 15, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
When doing a kindness to others the first thing that must be considered is that it should be unselfish, and not for the sake of appreciation or a reward. He who does good and waits for a reward is a laborer of good; but he who does good and disregards it is the master of good.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_3.htm


Life consists of a continual struggle for gain, of whatever kind it may be. Gain seems to be the purpose of life... But by a still deeper insight into the subject one sees that every gain a person has in view limits him to a certain extent to that gain, directs his activities into a certain channel, and forms the line of his fate. At the same time it deprives him of a still greater or a better gain and of the freedom of activity which might perhaps accomplish something still better. It is for this reason that renunciation is practiced by the Sufis; for with every willing renunciation a person proceeds a step towards a higher goal. No renunciation is ever fruitless. The one who is looking for a gain is smaller than his gain; the one who has renounced a thing has risen above it.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_5.htm


http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 23, 2011 03:12 am
The perfect life is following one's own ideal, not in checking those of others; leave everyone to follow his own ideal.

    Bowl of Saki, May 22, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
Religion in the East is not made into a thing apart from one's life, as in the West where business, profession, and other things on the one side of life, and going to church one day in the week on the other side, together constitute religion, with a prayer before going to rest. But, strictly speaking, life is religion. When one has that ideal before one with whatever occupation one is concerned, business, industry, domestic life, or whatever it is, one carries it out, trying to be worthy of it, that is religion.

In the Hindu language, the same word, Dharma, means both duty and religion. Both are expressed by one word. 'This is your Dharma' means: 'This is your faith.' How beautiful the thought is! Whatever kind of duty it is, so long as you have an ideal before you and are performing that duty, you are walking in the path of religion.

We, with our narrowness of faith or belief, accuse others of belonging to another religion, another chapel or church. We say, 'This temple is better, that faith is better.' The whole world has kept on fighting and devastating itself just because it can not understand that each form of religion is peculiar to itself. Therefore, the ideal life is in following one's own ideal. It is not in checking other people's ideals. If a certain thing is one's ideal, that does not mean that another person will agree that it is best to offer prayers ten times a day. He may be doing better by following his religion in his shop than by going to a mosque and offering up a prayer twenty times a day. Perhaps somebody with that ideal cannot see that the other person's way is an ideal also. Leave everyone to follow his own ideal. ...

We see now that it is all a matter of his ideal whether a man differs from his neighbor, whether he is heavenly or earthly, as high as the Devas, the heavenly beings, or as low as the demons. His ideal makes him as high as the one, or as low as the demons. The greatness of man lies in the greatness of his ideal.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 23, 2011 10:15 am
It is a strange thing to me how our ideals seem to change in life. This a result of time and experience.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 23, 2011 07:44 pm
it is natural

not strange


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 24, 2011 06:20 am
to me it is a natural occurrence

not strange

My little lotus blossom in the spring. There is nothing stranger than being me.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Alfred E. Newman on May 24, 2011 06:22 am
to me it is a natural occurrence

not strange

My little lotus blossom in the spring. There is nothing stranger than being me.

You can say that again!

      Alfie


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Laughing Goose on May 24, 2011 06:24 am
to me it is a natural occurrence

not strange

My little lotus blossom in the spring. There is nothing stranger than being me. Even a quacking goose who misses my friend endless squirrel could tell you that.

You can say that again!

      Alfie

O.K. I will then. There is nothing stranger than being him!

                 Laughing Goose


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Beatrice Landcaster on May 24, 2011 06:27 am
to me it is a natural occurrence

not strange

My little lotus blossom in the spring. There is nothing stranger than being me.

You can say that again!

      Alfie

O.K. I will then. There is nothing stranger than being him!

                 Laughing Goose

Hey ya al' Did I hear an echo or was that squirrel matting down his fur?



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Laughing Goose on May 24, 2011 06:35 am
to me it is a natural occurrence

not strange

My little lotus blossom in the spring. There is nothing stranger than being me.

You can say that again!

      Alfie

O.K. I will then. There is nothing stranger than being him!

                 Laughing Goose

Hey ya al' Did I hear an echo or was that squirrel matting down his fur?



Even a quacking goose who misses my friend endless squirrel could tell you that.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on May 24, 2011 09:54 am
Strangest thing happened on the way to the forum ....

I was enjoying a sip of saki, yeah the rice wine

spilt it all over, me and everything around me  :o

but all of a sudden, there was a moment of enlightenment !  ;D

and I felt surrounded by wisdom or was it words of Squisdom ?  8)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on May 24, 2011 10:00 am
of course

words of Squisdom

can in no way compare to the Wisdom found in the Saki bowl

thanx 14 ~ for sharing !  8)



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on May 24, 2011 10:27 am
Even a quacking goose who misses my friend endless squirrel could tell you that.

hey Quackers !  8)

missed you too !

 


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 29, 2011 10:06 pm
'God is love'; when love is awakened in the heart, God is awakened there.

     Bowl of Saki, May 29, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
Life's light is love; and when the heart is empty of love, a man is living and yet not living; from a spiritual point of view he is dead. When the heart is asleep, he is as though dead in this life, for one can only love through the heart. But love does not mean give and take. That is only a trade; it's selfishness. To give sixpence and receive a shilling is not love. Love is when one loves for the sake of love, when one cannot help but love, cannot do anything but love. Then one is not forced to love; there is no virtue in that. One does not love because another does. It is simply there. It cannot be helped. It is the only thing that makes a person alive. If a person loves one and hates another, what can he know of love? Can you love one person fully if at the same time you cannot bestow a kind glance on some other person? Can you say you love one person fully when you cannot bear him to be loved by someone else as well? Can you hate a person when love is sprinkled like water in your heart? Love is like the water of the Ganges. It is itself a purification. As the Bible says, 'God is love'. When love is awakened in the heart, God is awakened there. When a man has journeyed, he reaches the goal as soon as his heart has reached love.

The Sufi says, 'The Kaba, the divine place, paradise, is the heart of the human being'. That is why he has respect for every heart. Every heart is his Kaba, his shrine. The human heart is the place toward which he bows, for in this heart is God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_30.htm


Some object to Christ being called divine; but if divinity is not sought in man, then in what shall we seek God? Can divinity be found in the tree, in the plant, in the stone? Yes indeed, God is in all; but at the same time, it is in man that divinity is awakened, that God is awakened, that God can be seen.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_1.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 01, 2011 09:52 pm
Man's bodily appetites take him away from his heart's desires; his heart's desires keep him away from the abode of his soul.

     Bowl of Saki, June 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan



...There are two parts in man. One part is his external self, which the soul has borrowed from the earth; and the other part is his real self, which belongs to his Source. In other words an individual is a combination of spirit and matter, a current which runs from above and attracts to it the earth from below, shaping it in order to make it a vehicle. The human body is nothing but a vehicle of the soul which has come from above and has taken the human body as its abode. Thus an individual has two aspects of being: one is the soul, the other is the body. ... Whether he is in the forest or amidst the world's strife, the soul of man is always capable of rising to the greatest heights, if only he wishes to attain to them. ... Man does not need to trouble about what is lacking outside, for in reality all is within himself.

   
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 14, 2011 01:40 am

     Bowl of Saki, July 13, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


...he believes that the present is the echo of the past, and that the future will be the reflection of the present. It is not sufficient to think only of the present moment; one should also think where it comes from and where it goes. Every thought that comes to his mind, every impulse, every word he speaks, is to him like a seed, a seed which falls in this soil of life, and takes root. And in this way he finds that nothing is lost; every good deed, every little act of kindness, of love, done to anybody, will some day rise as a plant and bear fruit.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_12.htm[/quote]


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 14, 2011 04:59 pm
'God is love'; when love is awakened in the heart, God is awakened there.

     Bowl of Saki, May 29, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
As the Bible says, 'God is love'. When love is awakened in the heart, God is awakened there. When a man has journeyed, he reaches the goal as soon as his heart has reached love.

The Sufi says, 'The Kaba, the divine place, paradise, is the heart of the human being'. That is why he has respect for every heart. Every heart is his Kaba, his shrine. The human heart is the place toward which he bows, for in this heart is God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_30.htm


Some object to Christ being called divine; but if divinity is not sought in man, then in what shall we seek God? Can divinity be found in the tree, in the plant, in the stone? Yes indeed, God is in all; but at the same time, it is in man that divinity is awakened, that God is awakened, that God can be seen.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_1.htm

HI ERIC God is love Yes? and man has reached his goal when he has reached love. Yet reaching love does it stay with us? If only man/woman has the capacity to awaken divinity think of the road ahead of us. Think of what we can be and what we r. i enjoy these words of wisdom from the Sufi. It seems like some of them disappeared in your comment. If i was responsible for this i apologize it was not on purpose. Hope u will bring them back.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 14, 2011 08:24 pm
"Abstract Sound is called Saut-i Sarmad; all space is filled with it. The vibrations of this Sound are too fine to be either audible or visible to the material ears or eyes, since it is even difficult for the eyes to see the form and color of he ethereal vibrations on the external plane. It was the Saut-i Sarmad, the Sound of the abstract plane, which Muhammad heard in the cave of Ghar-i Hira when he became lost in his divine ideal. The Quran refers to this Sound in the words, 'Be! and all became.' Moses heard this very Sound on Mount Sinai, when in communion with God; and the same Word was audible to Christ when absorbed in his Heavenly Father in the wilderness. Shiva heard the same Anahad Nada during his Samadhi in the cave of the Himalayas. The flute of Krishna is symbolic of the same Sound. This Sound is the source of all revelation to the Masters, to whom it is revealed from within; it is because of this that they know and teach one and the same Truth." -- Hazrat Inayat Khan, The Mysticism of Sound

Hazrat Khan: "It sounds like Thunder, the roaring of the Sea, the jingling of Bells, running the Water, the Buzzing of bees, the Twittering of sparrows, the Vina, the Whistle, or the sound of Shankha..."(The Mysticism of Sound)

"The person, who is in tune with the universe, becomes like a radio receiver through which the Voice of the universe is transmitted." (Hazrat Khan)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 28, 2011 11:24 am
To fall beneath one's ideal is to lose one's share of life.

     Bowl of Saki, September 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
If anyone asked me what is the life of life, and what is the light of life, what gives one interest in life, I should answer him in one word, and that is: the ideal. A man with wealth, with qualifications, with learning, with comfort, but without ideal to me is a corpse; but a man without learning, without qualifications, without wealth or rank, but with an ideal is a living man. If a man does not live for an ideal what else does he live for? He lives for himself, which is nothing. The man who lives and does not know an ideal is powerless and without light. The greater the ideal, the greater the person. The wider the ideal the broader the person. The deeper the ideal the deeper the person, the higher the ideal the higher the person. Without an ideal, whatever a man may be in life, life for him is worthless.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_35.htm


The Sufi Message gives to the world the religion of the day; and that is to make one's life a religion, to turn one's occupation or profession into a religion, to make one's ideal a religious ideal. The object of Sufism is the uniting of life and religion, which so far seem to have been kept apart. When a man goes to church once a week, and devotes all the other days of the week to his business, how can he benefit from religion? Therefore the teaching of Sufism is to transform everyday life into a religion, so that every action may bear some spiritual fruit.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_31.htm

We, with our narrowness of faith or belief, accuse others of belonging to another religion, another chapel or church. We say, 'This temple is better, that faith is better.' The whole world has kept on fighting and devastating itself just because it can not understand that each form of religion is peculiar to itself. Therefore, the ideal life is in following one's own ideal. It is not in checking other people's ideals.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_29.htm


The man who has never had an ideal may hope to find one. He is in a better state than the man who allows the circumstances of life to break his ideal. To fall beneath one's ideal is to lose one's track in life. Then confusion rises in the mind, and that light which one should hold high becomes covered and obscured, so that it cannot shine out to light one's path.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_II_4.htm


An ideal is something to hope for and to hold on to, and in the absence of an ideal hope has nothing to look forward to. It is the lack of idealism which accounts for the present degeneration of humanity in spite of all the progress it has made in other directions. There are many kinds of ideals: principles, virtues, objects of devotion; but the greatest and highest of all ideals is the God-ideal. And when this God-ideal upon which all other ideals are based is lost, then the very notion of ideal is ignored. Man needs many things in life, but his greatest need is an ideal.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.htm



   ~~~ To fall beneath one's ideal is to lose one's share of life.



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 02, 2011 09:07 pm
It always means that you must sacrifice something very dear to you when His call comes.
     Bowl of Saki, October 2, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

...When we think deeply about the problem of life, there is no path in the world, whether spiritual or material, which we can tread successfully without a sacrifice. Sometimes the sacrifice is great, and sometimes small; sometimes the sacrifice is made first, before achieving success, and sometimes afterwards. As sacrifice is necessary in life, it is made by everyone in some form or other, but when it is made willingly, it turns into a virtue. The greater the ideal, the greater the sacrifice it demands... sacrifice of a possession is the first step; the next one is self-sacrifice, which was the inner note of the religion of Jesus Christ. Charity, generosity, even tolerance and forbearance, are a kind of sacrifice, and every sacrifice in life, in whatever form, means a step towards the goal of every soul.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_22.htm


I gave up my music because I had received from it all that I had to receive. To serve God one must sacrifice what is dearest to one; and so I sacrificed my music. I had composed songs; I sang and played the vina; and practicing this music I arrived at a stage where I touched the Music of the Spheres. Then every soul became for me a musical note, and all life became music. Inspired by it I spoke to the people, and those who were attracted by my words listened to them, instead of listening to my songs.

Now, if I do anything, it is to tune souls instead of instruments; to harmonize people instead of notes. If there is anything in my philosophy, it is the law of harmony: that one must put oneself in harmony with oneself and with others. I have found in every word a certain musical value, a melody in every thought, harmony in every feeling; and I have tried to interpret the same thing, with clear and simple words, to those who used to listen to my music. I played the vina until my heart turned into this very instrument; then I offered this instrument to the divine Musician, the only musician existing. Since then I have become His flute; and when He chooses, He plays His music. The people give me credit for this music, which in reality is not due to me but to the Musician who plays on His own instrument.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/II/II_0.htm

(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik90.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 02, 2011 09:08 pm
"Abstract Sound is called Saut-i Sarmad; all space is filled with it. The vibrations of this Sound are too fine to be either audible or visible to the material ears or eyes, since it is even difficult for the eyes to see the form and color of he ethereal vibrations on the external plane. It was the Saut-i Sarmad, the Sound of the abstract plane, which Muhammad heard in the cave of Ghar-i Hira when he became lost in his divine ideal. The Quran refers to this Sound in the words, 'Be! and all became.' Moses heard this very Sound on Mount Sinai, when in communion with God; and the same Word was audible to Christ when absorbed in his Heavenly Father in the wilderness. Shiva heard the same Anahad Nada during his Samadhi in the cave of the Himalayas. The flute of Krishna is symbolic of the same Sound. This Sound is the source of all revelation to the Masters, to whom it is revealed from within; it is because of this that they know and teach one and the same Truth." -- Hazrat Inayat Khan, The Mysticism of Sound

Hazrat Khan: "It sounds like Thunder, the roaring of the Sea, the jingling of Bells, running the Water, the Buzzing of bees, the Twittering of sparrows, the Vina, the Whistle, or the sound of Shankha..."(The Mysticism of Sound)

"The person, who is in tune with the universe, becomes like a radio receiver through which the Voice of the universe is transmitted." (Hazrat Khan)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on Oct 12, 2011 08:50 am
Enjoying these saki moments! Thanx littlerain !  8)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 12, 2011 09:07 am
thank you squirrel... i'm glad we both enjoy these. : ) appreciate ya. have a gnight . . . adios amigo :  )


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on Oct 12, 2011 09:19 am
welcome amigo  8) gnight ? best time to meditate is after midnight .....

all the spirits are awake and wanting to talk !  :o ;D 8)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 13, 2011 10:21 pm
When in ourselves there is inharmony, how can we spread harmony?

     Bowl of Saki, October 13, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

It is harmony which makes beauty; beauty in itself has no meaning. An object which is called beautiful at a certain place and time is not beautiful at another place or another time. And so it is with thought, speech and action: that which is called beautiful is only so at a certain time and under certain conditions which make it beautiful. So if one can give a true definition of beauty, it is harmony.  ...

The teaching of Christ, 'Resist not evil,' is a hint not to respond to inharmony. For instance, a word of kindness, of sympathy, an action of love and affection finds response, but a word of insult, an action of revolt or of hatred creates a response too, and that response creates more inharmony in the world. By giving way to inharmony one allows inharmony to multiply. At this time one sees in the world the greatest unrest and discomfort pervading all over. Where does it come from? It seems to come from ignorance of this fact that inharmony creates inharmony and will multiply inharmony.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_9.htm


The wise in all ages have dived deep into life in order to attain unity in themselves, and in order to spread unity. In the life of the world every man has some complaint to make. He lacks something; he is troubled by something. But this is only the external reason; the real truth is that he is not in unity with his own soul, for when there is disharmony in ourselves how can we spread harmony? When mind and body are at war the soul wants something else, and soul and mind are pulled by the body, or the body and mind by the soul; and so there is disharmony. When a man is in harmony with himself, he is in harmony with all; he produces harmony and gives harmony to all, he gives it out all the time.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_1.htm



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 11, 2011 03:35 am
   
Mastery lies not merely in stilling the mind, but in directing it towards whatever point you desire.


     Bowl of Saki, November 10, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

The mind of an average person may be pictured as an unruly horse that jumps and kicks and throws anyone that tries to ride it. Masters of the world are those who have mastered themselves, and mastery lies in the control of the mind. If the mind became your obedient servant, the whole world is at your service.

   ~~~ "Githa Series II, Amaliyyat 1, Psychology ", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


He who does not direct his own mind lacks mastery. ... If there is any self of which one can say, 'This is man', it is the mind. The three Sanskrit words Mana, Manu, Manusha show that man is his mind, is the product of his mind, and is also the controller of the activity of mind. If he does not control his mind, he is not a master but a slave. It lies with his own mind whether he shall be master, or whether he shall be slave. He is slave when he neglects to be master; he is master if he cares to be master.

Mastery lies not merely in stilling the mind, but in directing it towards whatever point we desire, in allowing it to be active as far as we wish, in using it to fulfill our purpose, in causing it to be still when we want to still it. He who has come to this has created his heaven within himself; he has no need to wait for a heaven in the hereafter, for he has produced it within his own mind now.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 11, 2011 03:37 am
Strangest thing happened on the way to the forum ....

I was enjoying a sip of saki, yeah the rice wine

spilt it all over, me and everything around me  :o

but all of a sudden, there was a moment of enlightenment !  ;D

and I felt surrounded by wisdom or was it words of Squisdom ?  8)

wow, i'm just catching this and apologize for my late response.
but wow. . . that's amazing. thank you for sharing with me, friend


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 15, 2011 02:25 am
hello jitendra and namaste2all
both of you have reminded me of todays saki lesson
Words are but the shells of thoughts and feelings.

     Bowl of Saki, November 14, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

In spite of whatever wisdom we may have; we can make a mistake if we have no control over our words. And we can easily find examples of this truth; those who talk much have less power than those who talk little. For a talkative person may not be able to express an idea in a thousand words which those who are masters of silence express in one word. ... What gives power over words? What gives the power that can be attained by silence? The answer is: it is will power which gives the control over words; it is silence which gives one the power of silence. It is restlessness when a person speaks too much. The more words are used to express an idea, the less powerful they become. It is a great pity that man so often thinks of saving pennies and never thinks of sparing words. It is like saving pebbles and throwing away pearls. An Indian poet says, 'Pearl-shell, what gives you your precious contents? Silence; for years my lips were closed.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_34.htm


The mystic sees another significance of the mouth than for it to be a receptacle of food and drink.  Through the mouth words of wisdom are expressed, sacred words repeated.  Therefore the mouth is likened to a shell from which pearl-like words become manifest.  As by the opening of the mouth words are expressed so by the closing of the mouth the word is drawn within, which becomes a living word compared with all other words, which are lost after once they are spoken.

   ~~~ "Sangita II, Shaghal 9", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)



   ~~~ Words are but the shells of thoughts and feelings.


cheers


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 18, 2011 08:32 am
If the eyes and ears are open, the leaves of the trees become as pages of the Bible.

     Bowl of Saki, November 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik12.jpg)
Quote

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


If one would realize that the world of God, His splendor and magnificence, are to be seen in the wise and the foolish, in the good and the bad, then one would think tolerantly and reverently of all mankind, knowing that it represents the messenger, as the messenger represents God. For no one has seen God at any time, but if there is anyone who represents God, it is the man who speaks His word. God is seen in the one who glorifies Him. But if our hearts are closed, even if we wait for a thousand years for the messenger to show himself, we shall never find him. For he who is always there has said, 'I am Alpha and Omega. I exist every moment. When you call me, I am there. Knock at the door, and I will answer you.' And those whose eyes are open do not need to go to a church and look at a picture or statue of the Lord. In the eyes of every infant, in the smile of every innocent child, they receive the blessing of Christ.

It only means changing one's outlook on life, and recognizing the divine in man. But man has ignored the divine spirit that manifests in humanity, and always prefers an idol, a painting, a picture, to the living God, who is constantly before him. For the sage, the seer, the saint, and the yogi who begin to see the master, and see him living, there is no place where he cannot be seen. Then everywhere the beloved master is ready to answer the cry of the soul coming from friend, father or teacher. And if we go a little further forward, we will find that the teacher speaks aloud, not only through living beings, but through nature. If the eyes and ears are open, the leaves of the trees become as pages of the Bible. If the heart is alive, the whole life becomes one single vision of His sublime beauty, speaking to us at every moment.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Nov 18, 2011 09:53 am
hello jitendra and namaste2all
both of you have reminded me of todays saki lesson
Words are but the shells of thoughts and feelings.

     Bowl of Saki, November 14, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

In spite of whatever wisdom we may have; we can make a mistake if we have no control over our words. And we can easily find examples of this truth; those who talk much have less power than those who talk little. For a talkative person may not be able to express an idea in a thousand words which those who are masters of silence express in one word. ... What gives power over words? What gives the power that can be attained by silence? The answer is: it is will power which gives the control over words; it is silence which gives one the power of silence. It is restlessness when a person speaks too much. The more words are used to express an idea, the less powerful they become. It is a great pity that man so often thinks of saving pennies and never thinks of sparing words. It is like saving pebbles and throwing away pearls. An Indian poet says, 'Pearl-shell, what gives you your precious contents? Silence; for years my lips were closed.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_34.htm


The mystic sees another significance of the mouth than for it to be a receptacle of food and drink.  Through the mouth words of wisdom are expressed, sacred words repeated.  Therefore the mouth is likened to a shell from which pearl-like words become manifest.  As by the opening of the mouth words are expressed so by the closing of the mouth the word is drawn within, which becomes a living word compared with all other words, which are lost after once they are spoken.

   ~~~ "Sangita II, Shaghal 9", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)



   ~~~ Words are but the shells of thoughts and feelings.


cheers


Hi Eric Thank You so much for what is quoted full of wisdom. i do not know how much they apply to me. Perhaps a lot. i speak often on the forum because it helps me maintain friendships; or is that the case? One often pauses to reflect.

Sometimes it is better to remain silent on a subject because in the process of talking u become the fool. However, remaining silent when something needs to be said also can show a lack of love, caring and concern. Often i hope others will speak and initiate relationships of some sort because there is nothing more i can say without becoming part of their agenda of controlling the relationship.

This does not cover all the thoughts on this subject; just wanted u to know i appreciated the subject by returning a comment because i care about u as i do others here.

In Divine Friendship

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 19, 2011 03:07 am
hi steve incase you were wondering why i was reminded of you and scott(?) is because lately in both of your post(recent past) you discuss similar- thats all
the timing of these messages are mysteriously beautiful sometimes, worth sharing


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: yoshi on Nov 19, 2011 01:11 pm
(((eric)))

thank u for your bowl of saki posts.....packed full of wisdom and inspiration they are, by such one-der-full masters...

thank you...i appreciate them very much and always look forward to reading them <3<3<3

(((Love&Hugs&OM)))
yoshi


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: flying squirrel on Nov 22, 2011 06:34 am
one- der- full  ;D

one - der - full  ;D

thirsting for more  V8 or is it Sakee !  ;D 8)

so confused walking thru that spiritual portal, LOL


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 15, 2011 09:44 am
as true as the message might be, it makes me sad nonetheless  :'( i can't always do what master ask

Quote
He who keeps no secrets has no depth in his heart.

     Bowl of Saki, December 14, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

He who keeps no secret has no depth; his heart is like a vessel turned upside down.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/gayan_boulas.htm


The secret of all attainment is centered in reserve. Spiritual or material, when a person has told his plans to others, he has let out the energy that he should have kept as a reservoir of power for the accomplishment of his object. ... The teaching, 'Be wise as a serpent,' may be interpreted, 'Be quiet as a serpent.' It is quietude that gives wisdom and power. The thought held in mind speaks to the mind of another, but the thought spoken out most often only reaches the ears of a person. Every plan has a period of development; and if man has power over his impulse, by retaining the thought silently in mind, he allows the plan to develop and to take all necessary changes that it may take for its culmination. But when the impulse expresses the thought, it so to speak 'puts out the flame,' thus hindering the development of the plan. The wise speak with their mind many times before they speak about it to anybody.

   ~~~ "Githa I, Sadhana 7, The Path of Attainnment", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


I say, "Without the control over your lips you will not be able to develop inspiration."  As a poet has said, "When the shell closes its lips, then the pearl develops in it." ... the more you are able to keep your secret in your heart, the greater you become.  You have more weight, your personality becomes more reliable, more dependable.  As it is said in Vadan that it is best to say something without saying.

   ~~~ "Sangatha II, Secrecy on the Path of Truth", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


As soon as a person thinks, 'I am more,' the doors of knowledge are closed. He will no more be able to widen his knowledge because automatically, the doors of his heart are closed the moment he says, 'I know.'

Spiritual knowledge, the knowledge of life, is so intoxicating, so exalting, it gives such a great joy, that one begins to pour out one's knowledge before anyone who comes along as soon as this knowledge springs up. But if at that time the disciple could realize that he should conserve that kindling of the light, reserve it, keep it within himself and let it deepen, then his words would not be necessary and his presence would enlighten people. As soon as the spring rises and he pours forth what comes out of that spring in words, although on the one side his vanity will be satisfied, on the other side his energy will be exhausted. The little spring that had risen, he has poured out before others and he remains without power. This is why reserve is taught to the true disciple, the conserving of inspiration and power. The one who speaks is not always wise; it is the one who listens who is wise.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_2_8.htm


The more one knows the secret of the world the more one feels inclined to keep it secret. And the more one keeps secret what one knows the more life unfolds its secrets to one. ...  it must be remembered that the power of the body is nothing in comparison with the power of the mind. And the power of the one who keeps a secret is greater than the power of the giant who lifts a mountain. All that one holds is preserved, all that one lets go is dispersed.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_20.htm



   ~~~ He who keeps no secrets has no depth in his heart.

it's hard.  :-[


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Dec 15, 2011 06:53 pm
as true as the message might be, it makes me sad nonetheless  :'( i can't always do what master ask

Quote
He who keeps no secrets has no depth in his heart.

     Bowl of Saki, December 14, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

He who keeps no secret has no depth; his heart is like a vessel turned upside down.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/gayan_boulas.htm


The secret of all attainment is centered in reserve. Spiritual or material, when a person has told his plans to others, he has let out the energy that he should have kept as a reservoir of power for the accomplishment of his object. ... The teaching, 'Be wise as a serpent,' may be interpreted, 'Be quiet as a serpent.' It is quietude that gives wisdom and power. The thought held in mind speaks to the mind of another, but the thought spoken out most often only reaches the ears of a person. Every plan has a period of development; and if man has power over his impulse, by retaining the thought silently in mind, he allows the plan to develop and to take all necessary changes that it may take for its culmination. But when the impulse expresses the thought, it so to speak 'puts out the flame,' thus hindering the development of the plan. The wise speak with their mind many times before they speak about it to anybody.

   ~~~ "Githa I, Sadhana 7, The Path of Attainnment", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


I say, "Without the control over your lips you will not be able to develop inspiration."  As a poet has said, "When the shell closes its lips, then the pearl develops in it." ... the more you are able to keep your secret in your heart, the greater you become.  You have more weight, your personality becomes more reliable, more dependable.  As it is said in Vadan that it is best to say something without saying.

   ~~~ "Sangatha II, Secrecy on the Path of Truth", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


As soon as a person thinks, 'I am more,' the doors of knowledge are closed. He will no more be able to widen his knowledge because automatically, the doors of his heart are closed the moment he says, 'I know.'

Spiritual knowledge, the knowledge of life, is so intoxicating, so exalting, it gives such a great joy, that one begins to pour out one's knowledge before anyone who comes along as soon as this knowledge springs up. But if at that time the disciple could realize that he should conserve that kindling of the light, reserve it, keep it within himself and let it deepen, then his words would not be necessary and his presence would enlighten people. As soon as the spring rises and he pours forth what comes out of that spring in words, although on the one side his vanity will be satisfied, on the other side his energy will be exhausted. The little spring that had risen, he has poured out before others and he remains without power. This is why reserve is taught to the true disciple, the conserving of inspiration and power. The one who speaks is not always wise; it is the one who listens who is wise.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_2_8.htm


The more one knows the secret of the world the more one feels inclined to keep it secret. And the more one keeps secret what one knows the more life unfolds its secrets to one. ...  it must be remembered that the power of the body is nothing in comparison with the power of the mind. And the power of the one who keeps a secret is greater than the power of the giant who lifts a mountain. All that one holds is preserved, all that one lets go is dispersed.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_20.htm



   ~~~ He who keeps no secrets has no depth in his heart.

it's hard.  :-[



In Elisabeth Haich's book, "Initiation", she mentions twelve sets of opposites which we must learn to control and balance in order to improve yourself and your level of consciousness. At any moment in time u may required to exercise one side of one of these qualities. It is knowing when and how to exercise these qualities and to put them in perfect balance that are the lessons we must master to gain ultimate understanding and a higher consciousness. I am not absolutely sure that this is all there is; however, they are so general, that they may in fact constitute the summation of all such intangible thought forms. In any case, let's review them for what they are worth. They are as follows:

keeping silent - talking
receptivity - resistance to influence
obeying - ruling
humility - self confidence
lightning-like speed - circumspection
to accept everything - to be able to differentiate
ability to fight - peace
caution - courage
to possess nothing - to command everything
to have no ties - loyalty
contempt for death - regard for life
indifference - love


We r fortunate that Hazrat Inayat Khan has chosen to say so much; to speak his wisdom. He may b speaking of deeper experiences that may b held between two or more people. As u know a secret is only a secret because it was told to someone otherwise it is nothing to anyone else. It is like the breeze in the forest when no one is there to experience it.

i have posted this before. Yet it reminds me that there is a balance in everything and many times not expressing or speaking conveys a coldness, a lack of sympathy and love. If u watch a saint or Master like Amma or Paramahansa Yogananda u will find that much was said and they talked a good part of their lives. Yet we r grateful for their words as we r grateful for Hazrat Inayat Khan's words and your presence verbally here at spiritual portal.

What would spiritual communion b like if we did not share it and what would love b if we do not express it? i would much rather have someone make a few mistakes in talking and expressing then withholding and showing nothing and giving nothing that we can relate to. We know others by their presence and what they say and express. If they show no expression what do they share and what do we know of them? Some people r like rocks they show nothing but the hardness of their texture. It is because we have mouths and hands that we can express what we experience inside and it is because we have ears that we r often silent and learn to listen. When i am quiet i hope to b receptive to the wisdom of the silent ones. i want to listen with all my being.

We r fortunate to have your communication Eric. It is like a warm breeze in the coldness that often surrounds us.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 07, 2012 03:44 am
for flying squirrel
i hope you've enjoyed this little story as much as i
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik88.jpg)
The truth cannot be spoken; that which can be spoken is not the truth.

    Bowl of Saki, January 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Truth is that which can never be spoken in words and that which can be spoken in words is not the truth. The ocean is the ocean; the ocean is not a few drops of water that one puts in a bottle. Just so truth cannot be limited by words: truth must be experienced...

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_34.htm


...the truth cannot be put into words; all we can do is make an effort to render the mystery of life intelligible to our minds.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_12.htm


Very often people ask, "What is the nature of truth, is it a theory, a principle, a philosophy, or a doctrine?" All theories, philosophies, principles, and doctrines are only a cover over the truth. The ultimate truth is that which cannot spoken, for words are too inadequate to express it.

   ~~~ "Supplementary papers, Philosophy V", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


There is a well known Eastern legend giving the idea of a soul who had found truth. There was a wall of laughter and of smiles. This wall existed for ages and many tried to climb it, but few succeeded. Those who had climbed upon it saw something beyond, and so interested were they that they smiled, climbed over the wall and never returned. The people of the town began to wonder what magic could there be and what attraction, that whoever climbed the wall never returned. So they called it the wall of mystery. Then they said, 'We must make an enquiry and send someone who can reach the top, but we must tie him with a rope to hold him back.' When the man they had thus sent reached the top of the wall, he smiled and tried to jump over it, but they pulled him back. Still he smiled, and when the people eagerly asked, 'what did you see there?' he did not answer, he only smiled.

This is the condition of the seer. The man who in the shrine of his heart has seen the vision of God, the one who has the realization of truth, can only smile, for words can never really explain what truth means.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 05, 2012 08:25 pm
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik33.jpg)Man creates his own disharmony.

     Bowl of Saki, March 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Feelings such as pride, conceit, selfishness, jealousy, envy and contempt are all feelings which hurt others and which destroy one's own life making it full of the misery which springs from that selfish personal feeling, that ego of man. The more egoistic, the more conceited he is, the more miserable a life he has in the world, the more he makes the lives of others miserable. ... it is in the world that, growing up, he creates all this and this creation is called nafs or ego. Yet at the same time in the depth of the heart there is that goodness which is the divine goodness, that righteousness which man has inherited from the Father in heaven. ...

Man creates his own disharmony in his soul and then treats others in the same way; therefore he is not satisfied with his own life, nor is he satisfied with others because he feels that he has a complaint against others, although mostly it is caused by himself. What he gives he receives back, but he never sees that. He always thinks: what the depth of his being yearns for -- love, goodness, righteousness, harmony and peace -- everybody must give to him. But for him when it comes to giving he does not give because he lives in the other life he has created. ...

But when a revolution comes in the life of a man, as soon as he begins to see deeply into life, to acquire goodness -- not only to get but to give -- as soon as he begins to enjoy not only the sympathy of others but giving sympathy to others, then comes a period when he begins to see this Satan-spirit as apart from his real original being, standing before him constantly in conflict with his natural force, freedom and inclination. ... The mystery of perfection lies in annihilation -- not in annihilation of the real self, but of the false self, of the false conception which man has cherished in his heart and always has allowed to torture his life. ...

God speaks to everyone, not only to the messengers and teachers. He speaks to the ears of every heart, but it is not every heart which hears it. His voice is louder than the thunder, and His light is clearer than the sun -- if one could only see it, if one could only hear it. In order to see it and in order to hear it man should remove this wall, this barrier which he has made of the self. Then he becomes the flute upon which the divine Player may play the music of Orpheus which can charm even the hearts of stone; then he rises from the cross into the life everlasting.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_22.htm



   ~~~ Man creates his own disharmony.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 05, 2012 06:19 am
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik35.jpg)
photo 1    

To give sympathy is sovereignty, to desire it from others is captivity.

     Bowl of Saki, April 4, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


Although sometimes it gives a tender sensation in the heart to say, 'Oh, how poorly I am', and it is soothing to hear from someone, 'Oh, I am so sorry you are not well', yet I should think that one would prefer if another thing were said in sympathy, namely, 'I am so happy to see you are so well'. In order to create that tender sensation one need not be ill. What is needed is to be thankful. We can never be too thankful.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_11.htm


The first lesson given to man was to be grateful for his daily bread, because that was the greatest necessity of his life. Now that has become so simple and life has changed so much that man forgets to be thankful. He even thinks, 'Why should I give thanks?' He forgets that behind his own personality he covers God. His own toil seems more to him than the toil of every atom of nature that is preparing blessings for him.

Self-pity is the worst poverty; it is the source of all unhappiness and blinds man to all he should be thankful for. The constantly complaining habit and the tendency to demand sympathy from others bring the greatest thorn into man's life: he becomes dependent upon the sympathy of others. The best thing is to give sympathy.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm



   ~~~ To give sympathy is sovereignty, to desire it from others is captivity.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Apr 07, 2012 03:28 am
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik35.jpg)
photo 1    

To give sympathy is sovereignty, to desire it from others is captivity.

     Bowl of Saki, April 4, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


Although sometimes it gives a tender sensation in the heart to say, 'Oh, how poorly I am', and it is soothing to hear from someone, 'Oh, I am so sorry you are not well', yet I should think that one would prefer if another thing were said in sympathy, namely, 'I am so happy to see you are so well'. In order to create that tender sensation one need not be ill. What is needed is to be thankful. We can never be too thankful.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_11.htm


The first lesson given to man was to be grateful for his daily bread, because that was the greatest necessity of his life. Now that has become so simple and life has changed so much that man forgets to be thankful. He even thinks, 'Why should I give thanks?' He forgets that behind his own personality he covers God. His own toil seems more to him than the toil of every atom of nature that is preparing blessings for him.

Self-pity is the worst poverty; it is the source of all unhappiness and blinds man to all he should be thankful for. The constantly complaining habit and the tendency to demand sympathy from others bring the greatest thorn into man's life: he becomes dependent upon the sympathy of others. The best thing is to give sympathy.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm



   ~~~ To give sympathy is sovereignty, to desire it from others is captivity.

i know it is more blessed to give than to receive. i often have to remind myself of this.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Katze on Apr 07, 2012 09:59 am
Thank you abysmaltouch for sharing all your Saki stories with us !

Nitewish


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Serena Duvet on Apr 14, 2012 10:26 am
The April 4th post is so wonderful and true.

Thank you for giving us this great man's wisdom.

I needed this so much the last two days!

I want to pick the flowers rather than pierce

my skin with the brambles and thorns!

(http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i411/KikiDuvet/407328_386503848033555_100000218297937_1751539_1904214517_n-1.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 14, 2012 06:09 pm
hi serena
im glad you like it  :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 24, 2012 02:44 am
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik66.jpg)

Knowledge without love is lifeless.

     Bowl of Saki, April 23, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

The loveless heart may have all the religion and all the knowledge, yet it is dead. As the Bible says, "God is love." God is in the heart of each person, and the heart of each person is the highest heaven. When that heart is closed by the absence of love, then God is closed. When this heart is open, God is open, and one is alive from that time.

   ~~~ "Gathekas #22, Aims and Ideals", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


When the heart is not empty, in other words, when there is no scope in the heart, there is no place for love. Rumi, the great poet of Persia, explains this idea more clearly. He says the pains and sorrows the soul experiences through life are like holes made in a reed flute, and it is by making these holes that a player makes the flute out of a reed. This means that the heart of man is first a reed and the sufferings and pains it goes through make it a flute which can then be used by God as the instrument for the music that He constantly wishes to produce. But as every reed is not a flute, so every heart is not His instrument. As the reed can be made into a flute, so the human heart can be turned into an instrument, and can be offered to the God of love. It is the human heart which becomes the harp of the angels. It is the human heart which is known as the lute of Orpheus. It was on the model of the heart of man that the first instrument of music was made, and no earthly instrument can produce that music which the heart produces, raising the mortal soul to immortality. ... It is the knowledge of the head and the love of the heart that together fully express the divine message. ... It is by keen observation that man acquires knowledge. Knowledge without love is lifeless.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_28.htm


In love abides all knowledge. It is mankind's love and interest in things that in time reveals their secret, and then man knows how to develop, control, and utilize them. No one can know anybody, however much he may profess to know, except the lover, because in the absence of love the inner eyes are blind. Only the outer eyes are open, which are merely the spectacles of the inner eyes. If the sight is not keen, of what use are the spectacles? It is for this reason that we admire all those whom we love, and are blind to the good qualities of those whom we do not love. It is not always that these deserve our neglect, but our eyes, without love, cannot see their goodness. Those whom we love may have bad points too, but as love sees beauty, so we see that alone in them. Intelligence itself in its next step towards manifestation is love. When the light of love has been lit, the heart becomes transparent, so that the intelligence of the soul can see through it. But until the heart is kindled by the flame of love, the intelligence, which is constantly yearning to experience life on the surface, is groping in the dark.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_19.htm



   ~~~ Knowledge without love is lifeless.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Apr 26, 2012 01:51 am
i surmise this is the best from the bowl. It is the goal for me. Many times we
have sought love in the wrong places; Yet we do not succumb to growing weary.


Hydonus


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 07, 2012 01:08 am
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik49.jpg)

Unity in realization is far greater than unity in variety.

     Bowl of Saki, May 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

What keeps the soul in perplexity is the threefold aspect of manifestation, and as long as the soul remains puzzled by this, it cannot arrive at the knowledge of the One. These three aspects are the seer, sight, and the seen; the knower, knowledge, and the known. In point of fact these are three aspects of life. One aspect is the person who sees; the second aspect is the sight, or the eyes, by the help of which he sees; and the third aspect is that which he sees. That is why one cannot readily accept the idea that what one sees is the same as oneself, nor can one believe for a moment that the medium by which one sees is oneself, for these three aspects seem to be separate and to be looking at one another's faces, as the first person, second person, and third person of Brahma.

When this riddle is solved by the realization that the three are one, then the purpose of the God-ideal is fulfilled. For then the three veils which cover the One are lifted, then they no longer remain three, and then they are found to be One, the Only Being. As Abdul Karim al Jili, the fifteenth-century mystic, says, 'If you believe in one God, you are right; if you believe in two Gods, that is true; but if you believe in three Gods, that is right also, for the nature of unity is realized by variety.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_10.htm


Man's thought has a great power. And when he comes to the realization that everything comes from one source and that everything is developing towards one goal, he begins to see that the source and the goal are God. Then the world of variety is no longer variety to him but unity; it is one.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_29.htm


The power is in unity, but is lost in variety. Thus, for instance, if we hold a thing in our hand, we can hold it with strength, because all five fingers have united to hold the object. But if we try to lift it by one finger, this one finger may drop it, even though the finger belongs to the same hand. In all aspects of life unity is power. All religions show that power is in unity. This is the secret of philosophy.

There are two aspects of unity: firstly, the unity of variety; secondly, unity realizing itself. One is earthly, the other is heavenly. One cannot serve two masters. Unity is the only source of happiness. Unity in realization is far greater than unity in variety.

'When two hearts unite, they can break even mountains.' As two fuse in love, the more does intuition grow, the more does one understand whether the other is happy, or pleased, or displeased, whatever distance may separate them. This is nothing but just the unity of the one person with the other. It is clairvoyance. The mother knows the condition of her son at the battlefront. She can see him in her dreams. Hearts, which are united in love, perceive the state of mind of the loved ones. They do not have to study mysticism or concentration, for they have natural concentration. The mother does not pretend to meditate; love teaches her more meditation than a person who pretends to study it can attain.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_18.htm



   ~~~ Unity in realization is far greater than unity in variety.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: a story from todays saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 08, 2012 02:45 am
There is a story of a murshid and a mureed. The mureed said, 'O, Teacher, I should like to see heaven.' The teacher said, 'Yes, this is the way you should meditate in order to see heaven.' So the mureed went and did so; but the vision of heaven which he had was not as described in the scriptures, a place where one enjoys nothing but comfort and luxury, milk and honey, marble halls and white robes, beautiful gems and jewels, garlands of flowers, and the waving of palms. He could not see any of these, and he asked himself, 'Has the murshid perhaps shown me a wrong heaven, or have the prophets given a wrong message in the scriptures?'

So he went back to his teacher saying, 'Now I should like to see hell.' The murshid said, 'Yes, this is the way you should meditate in order to see hell.' And then the mureed did this, and he saw in a trance that there was certainly such a place, but there was no fire or snakes or serpents or thorns or tortures or imps or flames such as have been described to people throughout the ages. So he could not understand whether his vision was right or wrong; and he went back to the teacher, and said, 'I have seen in this way: I have not seen in heaven the things that are promised, nor have I seen in hell the things which are foretold as being there.' 'O,' the teacher said, 'all the things promised for the hereafter you will have to take there from here. They are not kept ready for you; you will have to bring them with you. If you take sorrows with you, you will find them there; if you take hatred, you will find it there. Your mind is like a gramophone record, and if you use a harsh voice, the instrument produces a harsh note; if beautiful words and tones, it will sing beautiful words and tones. It will produce the same record that you have experienced in life. Indeed you have not to wait till after death in order to experience it; you are experiencing it even now.'


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 17, 2012 05:28 am
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik41.jpg)The poverty of one who has renounced is real riches compared with the riches of one who holds them fast.

     Bowl of Saki, May 16, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


The saints and sages and prophets all had to go through this test and trial, and in proportion to the greatness of their renunciation, so great have these souls become. Renunciation is the sign of heroes, it is the merit of saints, it is the character of the masters, and it is the virtue of the prophets. ... It is as Fariduddin Attar, the great Persian poet, says, 'Renounce the good of the world, renounce the good of heaven, renounce your highest ideal, and then renounce your renunciation.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_9.htm


He who wants anything becomes smaller than the thing he wants; he who gives away anything is greater than the thing he gives. Therefore, to a mystic each act of renunciation becomes a step towards perfection.

Forced renunciation, whether forced by morality, religion, law, convention, or formality, is not necessarily renunciation. The real spirit of renunciation is willingness; and willing renunciation comes when one has risen above the thing one renounces. The value of each thing in life - wealth, power, position, possession - is according to the evolution of man. There is a time in his life when toys are his treasures, and there is a time when he puts them aside; there is a time in his life when copper coins are everything to him, and there is another time when he can give away gold coins; there is a time in his life when he values a cottage, and there is a time when he gives up a palace. ...

Every step towards progress and ascent is a step of renunciation. The poverty of the one who has renounced is real riches compared with the riches of the one who holds them fast. One could be rich in wealth and poverty-stricken in reality; and one can be penniless and yet richer than the rich of the world... The final victory in the battle of life for every soul is when he has abandoned, which means when he has risen above, what once he valued most... Such is the case with all things of the world; they seem important or precious when we need them or when we do not understand them; as soon as the veil which keeps man from understanding is lifted, then they are nothing.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_5.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Serena Duvet on May 22, 2012 01:35 am
There is a certain grasping that comes, I notice, with desire, that feels unpleasant.
At times when a friend has offered me something they did not want or value, my
expression of appreciation and thanks then propelled a change of heart on the part
of the friend, and they make a new decision to keep what would have been, a "gift." 
The undesirable has suddenly become full of value due to another's finding it desirable! 
But then on the other hand, it seems almost a psychological law to want what one doesn't
or cannot have.  This comes to play at times in affairs of the heart... if only we could all
be open giving hearts!

(http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i411/KikiDuvet/the_wild_swans_at_coole.jpg)


 


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 23, 2012 02:15 am
There is a certain grasping that comes, I notice, with desire, that feels unpleasant.
At times when a friend has offered me something they did not want or value, my
expression of appreciation and thanks then propelled a change of heart on the part
of the friend, and they make a new decision to keep what would have been, a "gift." 
The undesirable has suddenly become full of value due to another's finding it desirable! 
But then on the other hand, it seems almost a psychological law to want what one doesn't
or cannot have.  This comes to play at times in affairs of the heart... if only we could all
be open giving hearts!

(http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i411/KikiDuvet/the_wild_swans_at_coole.jpg)
 

nomaste serena

 at a certain level of consciousness i see what you r  talking about. people wanting what they can't have. in the fairest of the heart there comes a recognition that our own worth and kindness
 exceeds the worth of the coveted person. this happens when we live in the consciousness
 of giving and acceptance. it may appear we covet someone when indeed what we are doing is giving love in return for coldness anger or sadness in another.
we may see something valuable in someone else and not give up on them.
 this does not mean we dot not appreciate what we do have.
 as Khan says. when the veil of understanding is liifted from material objects and people
 we gain a total different perspective.


Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 23, 2012 03:14 am
from david wolfes sunfood diet success system
 we do not know how the world really is; we only know what our beliefs are about the world. our perceptions create our reality.

The perfect life is following one's own ideal, not in checking those of others; leave everyone to follow his own ideal.

     Bowl of Saki, May 22, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik3.jpg)
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 07, 2012 09:40 pm
We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world.

     Bowl of Saki, June 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
Externally we are a single being, but internally we are a world. As vast as is the world around us, so vast is the world within. Asif says, 'The limitation of the sky and land cannot be compared with man's heart. If man's heart be wide, there is nothing wider than this.' All can be accommodated in it; heaven earth, sun, moon, all are reflected in it. It becomes itself the whole. This world becomes as one chooses to make it. If man only knew that! But since he does not know that, the world is not heaven, but has become its opposite. We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world; that our world has an influence upon our life within as well as upon our life without.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_17.htm


One learns to understand that there is a world in one's self, that in one's mind there is a source of happiness and unhappiness, the source of health and illness, the source of light and darkness, and that it can be awakened, either mechanically or at will, if only one knew how to do it. Then one does not blame his ill fortune nor complain of his fellow man. He becomes more tolerant, more joyful, and more loving toward his neighbor, because he knows the cause of every thought and action, and he sees it all as the effect of a certain cause.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm



   ~~~ We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world.


Nobody appears inferior to us when our heart is kindled with kindness and our eyes are open to the vision of God.

     Bowl of Saki, June 7, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
We are so situated in life that whatever position we may occupy we are never independent, we are never self-sufficient. Therefore, every individual depends upon others for help, and others depend upon him for help; only the position of the person who is one among many who receive help becomes lower in the eyes of those who count themselves among the few who can help.

This makes every person a master as well as a servant. Yet everyone, in the intoxication of his mastership, forgets his place as a servant, and looks upon the one who helps him as his servant. The wise, whose feelings are awakened, think on this question deeply, and do their best to avoid every possibility of giving even an idea to a servant of his servantship, far less insulting him in any way or hurting his feelings. We are all equal, and if we have helpers to serve us in life we ought to feel humble and most thankful for the privilege, instead of making the position of the servant humble. ... One cannot commit a greater sin than hurting the feelings of the one who serves us and depends upon our help. Once the Prophet heard his grandson call a servant by his name. On hearing this he at once said to his grandson, 'No, child, that is not the right way of addressing elders. You ought to call him 'uncle.' It does not matter if he serves us, we are all servants of one another, and we are equal in the sight of God.'

There is a verse of Mahmud-i Ghaznavi: 'The Emperor Mahmud, who had thousands of slaves to wait on his call, became the slave of his slaves when love gushed forth from his heart.' Nobody appears inferior to us when our heart is kindled with kindness and our eyes are open to the vision of God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_4.htm


As Christ teaches, 'Whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him twain.' What does all this teach us? It is all a lesson in sympathy for one's fellow man, to teach us to share in his troubles, in his despair. For whoever really experiences this joy of life, finds that it becomes so great that it fills his heart and his soul. It does not matter if he has fewer comforts or an inferior position than many in this world, because the light of his kindness, of his sympathy, of the love that is growing, the virtue that is springing up in his heart, all fill the soul with light. There is nothing now that he lacks in life, for he has become the king of it.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_1.htm



   ~~~ Nobody appears inferior to us when our heart is kindled with kindness and our eyes are open to the vision of God.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki ~ Negative Manifestations
Post by: Serena Duvet on Jun 08, 2012 06:09 pm
I have two friends that are sometimes led to put others down (unnecessarily.)
Sometimes it's simply a statement that is judgmental.  Sometimes it's a prying
question.  It feels uncomfortable to me when it happens, but I've never been led
to be confrontational back, or question motivation.  Recently I called one of the
friends during the time of the special solar eclipse.  She wasn't feeling well to
the point where she didn't answer the phone.  Later on another day she apologized
and said that she was working through some heavy emotional stuff.  Still later, on
another day, she told me what it was about.  That she had come to realize that she
was very judgmental and that it was very painful.  She goes to many, many meditation
retreats throughout the year and attends Buddhist meditations weekly and takes many
spiritual seminars.  I wonder if her realization was spontaneous, or after much reflection,
or if someone confronted her.  When she told me that she was suffering with the realization
I listened but did not protest.  She had demonstrated it to me so many times.  It seems as
though it may stem from a mistrust of others (at times) with me, anyway.  Once, when we
became separated hiking and she blamed me although I told her I waited and waited for her
when I became aware that she had taken a different fork (behind me) on the way to the same
destination.  She walked by and neither of us saw the other!  Things are funny that way sometimes.
Yes, why blame another?  Why criticize another?  Why judge another?  Jesus said:
"May the man without sin cast the first stone."    

(http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i411/KikiDuvet/3713702782_ff74a3e023.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki ~ Negative Manifestations
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 09, 2012 02:59 pm
I have two friends that are sometimes led to put others down (unnecessarily.)
Sometimes it's simply a statement that is judgmental.  Sometimes it's a prying
question.  It feels uncomfortable to me when it happens, but I've never been led
to be confrontational back, or question motivation.  Recently I called one of the
friends during the time of the special solar eclipse.  She wasn't feeling well to
the point where she didn't answer the phone.  Later on another day she apologized
and said that she was working through some heavy emotional stuff.  Still later, on
another day, she told me what it was about.  That she had come to realize that she
was very judgmental and that it was very painful.  She goes to many, many meditation
retreats throughout the year and attends Budbydhist meditations weekly and takes many
spiritual seminars.  I wonder if her realization was spontaneous, or after much reflection,
or if someone confronted her.  When she told me that she was suffering with the realization
I listened but did not protest.  She had demonstrated it to me so many times.  It seems as
though it may stem from a mistrust of others (at times) with me, anyway.  Once, when we
became separated hiking and she blamed me although I told her I waited and waited for her
when I became aware that she had taken a different fork (behind me) on the way to the same
destination.  She walked by and neither of us saw the other!  Things are funny that way sometimes.
Yes, why blame another?  Why criticize another?  Why judge another?  Jesus said:
"May the man without sin cast the first stone."    

(http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i411/KikiDuvet/3713702782_ff74a3e023.jpg)

Serena

It is difficult to meditate for any length of time without having some change of consciousness.
people are used to  experiences of the senses. these experiences are more dramatic. initial experiences with meditation work more subtly amd psychologically.  there is also much introspection that goes along with some searching and interior meditation. no doubt your friend is giving u  a view of this. for those on the path the landscape itself can change. we might not even see something that we usually are able to see. do you remember the incident with the van?

when we are in the hands of spirit we are often given lessons as an act of grace.
these experiences help us understand how we function and increase our spiritual awareness.
they may even appear to seem unpleasant. yet quite often human beings are
not adaptable to change. the ego persists in maintaining its identity while spirit erodes its foundations so that we have a sky opening to heaven. our perspective changes and we view
our experiences with our friends and with other people very differently.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Serena Duvet on Jun 09, 2012 06:23 pm
Beautifully put... thank you!


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 21, 2012 05:03 am
Love lies in service; only that which is done not for fame or name, not for the appreciation or thanks of those for whom it is done, is love's service.

    Bowl of Saki, June 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Love lies in service. Only that which is done, not for fame or name, nor for the appreciation or thanks of those for whom it is done, is love's service.

The lover shows kindness and beneficence to the beloved. He does whatever he can for the beloved in the way of help, service, sacrifice, kindness, or rescue, and hides it from the world and even from the beloved. If the beloved does anything for him he exaggerates it, idealizes it, makes it into a mountain from a molehill. He takes poison from the hands of the beloved as sugar, and love's pain in the wound of his heart is his only joy. By magnifying and idealizing whatever the beloved does for him and by diminishing and forgetting whatever he himself does for the beloved, he first develops his own gratitude, which creates all goodness in his life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_22.htm



The Sufi moral is this: Love another and do not depend upon his love; and: Do good to another and do not depend upon receiving good from him; serve another and do not look for service from him. All you do for another out of your love and kindness, you should think that you do, not to that person, but to God. And if the person returns love for love, goodness for goodness, service for service, so much the better. If he does not return it, then pity him for what he loses; for his gain is much less than his loss.

Do not look for thanks or appreciation for all the good you do to others, nor use it as a means to stimulate your vanity. Do all that you consider good for the sake of goodness, not even for a return of that from God.

   ~~~ "Sangatha I, Saluk", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


(http://www.evansvilledancesofuniversalpeace.org/resources/Artwork/WingedSufiBlue.gif)




.




Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 11, 2012 09:54 pm
namaste !
thank you for your teachings murshid hazrat khan
prayers to sanctify !
Do not bemoan the past, do not worry about the future, but try to make the best of today.

     Bowl of Saki, July 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


There is not anything one should not be ready to tolerate, and there is nobody whom one should not forgive. Never doubt those whom you trust; never hate those whom you love; never cast down those whom you once raise in your estimation. Wish to make friends with everyone you meet; make an effort to gain the friendship of those you find difficult ... No one is either higher or lower than oneself. In all sources that fulfill one's need, one may see one source, God, the only source; and in admiring and in bowing before and in loving anyone, one may consider one is doing it to God. In sorrow one may look to God, and in joy one may thank Him. One does not bemoan the past, nor worry about the future; one tries only to make the best of today. One should know no failure, for even in a fall there is a stepping-stone to rise.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_I_2.htm


In Fitzgerald's translation of Omar Khayyam: 'O my Beloved, fill the cup that clears today of past regrets and future fears. Why, tomorrow I may be myself, with yesterday's sev'n thousand years!' By this he means: Make the best of this moment; it is now that you can clearly see eternity, if you live in this moment. But if you keep the world of the past or the world of the future before you, you do not live in eternity but in a limited world. In other words, live neither in the past nor in the future, but in eternity. It is now that we should try to discover that happiness which is to be found in the freedom of the soul.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIIIa/VIIIa_1_1.htm



   ~~~ Do not bemoan the past, do not worry about the future, but try to make the best of today.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 18, 2012 07:35 pm
The principles of mysticism rise from the heart of man; they are learnt by intuition and proved by reason.

(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik14.jpg)    Bowl of Saki, October 18, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
One might ask why man has lost that intuitive faculty. It is because he has become so absorbed in material gain that he has become, as it were, intoxicated by the worldly life; and intuition, which is his birthright and his own property, has been lost from view. This does not mean that it is gone from him, only that it has become buried in his own heart.

We are vehicles or instruments that respond. If we respond to goodness, goodness becomes our property. If we respond to evil, then evil becomes our property. If we respond to love, then love becomes our possession. If we respond to hatred, hatred becomes our life. And if we respond to the things of the earth so much that our whole life becomes absorbed in worldly things, then it is quite natural that we should not respond to those riches which are within us

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_3.htm


As soon as intuition springs up, reason, its competitor, rises also and says, 'No, it is not so.' Then there is conflict in the mind and it is hard to distinguish, because there are two feelings at the same time. If one makes a habit of catching the first intuition and saving it from being destroyed by reason, then intuition is stronger and one can benefit by it. There are many intuitive people, but they cannot always distinguish between intuition and reason and sometimes they mix them up, for very often the second thought, being the last, is more clear to one than the first. Therefore, the intuition is forgotten and reason remembered. Then a person calls it intuition and it is not so.

Reason and intuition are two competitors, and yet both have their place, their importance, and their value. The best thing would be first to try and catch the intuition and distinguish and know and recognize it as intuition; and then to reason it out.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_37.htm


Quote
The principles of mysticism rise from the heart of man. They are learned by intuition and proved by reason. This is not only faith, though it is born of faith: it is faith with proof.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_17.htm


My intuition, has thou ever deceived me? No, never. It is my reason which so often deludes me, for it comes from without; thou art rooted within my heart.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/vadan_alankaras.htm



   ~~~ The principles of mysticism rise from the heart of man; they are learnt by intuition and proved by reason.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: yoshi on Oct 19, 2012 02:06 am
very nice posts dragonpie....pronams to you.

hazarat.....'his' soul shines through.  soul 'speaks Truth'.

if one desires to increase intuition....one needs to meditate....meditate upon god.

we create our own reality.

reality resides in our consciousness. 

is hell a place or a reality ?  is heaven a place or reality ?

(((love hugs om)))
yoshi




Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 09, 2012 02:37 am
thanks yoshi.
reality resides in our consciousness  :) pronams to you friend =)
here is todays saki


 Self-denial is not renouncing things, it is denying the self; and the first lesson of self-denial is humility.


            (http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik85.jpg)            Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
There is a story of a dervish who spoke with a young man who was very interested in his words of wisdom. The young man said, 'If I come to your part of the world, I will come to see you. Will you tell me where you live?' The dervish replied, 'I live in the place of the liars'. ... When he went to that country and asked for the dervish, the people said, 'We do not know any place of liars, but there is a dervish living somewhere here'. So they took him near the graveyard where the dervish lived.

The first question the young man asked was, 'Why did you give me a name which is not the name of the place?' The dervish replied, 'Yes, this is a place of liars'. It was the graveyard. He said, 'Come with me, I shall show you. This here is a tomb, they say, of a general. Where is his sword, where is his power, where is his voice, what is he now? Is he a general? Here, this one was called a prime-minister. Where is his ministry, where is his office, where is his pen, where is his power? In the same ground! This person was called a judge. Whom is he judging now? He is in the ground. Were they not liars? Did they not tell a lie saying I am so and so, and I am such and such?'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_16.htm

Quote
There is a beautiful story told of the King Akbar that when he was grieving with an almost ungovernable grief over the death of his mother, his ministers and friends tried to comfort him by influence and power. Akbar replied, "Yes, that is true, and that only makes my grief greater; for while I have everyone to bow before me, to give way to me, to salute me and obey me, my mother was the one person before whom I could humble myself; and I cannot tell you how great a joy that was to me."

Think then of the far greater joy of humbling oneself before the Father-Mother God on Whose Love one can always depend. A spark only of love expresses itself in the human father and mother; the Whole of Love in God. In whatever manner a man humbles himself it can never be enough to express the humility of the limited self before Limitless Perfection. Self-denial is not renouncing of things, it is denying the self; and the first lesson of self-denial is humility.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


 :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 21, 2012 12:34 am
Bowl of Saki for November 20
   (http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik55.jpg)

It is the soul's light which is natural intelligence.


                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
Coming to the cause of the lack of joy, one realizes by pondering on the subject that it is not pursuing after joy that results in disappointment, it is the wrong method adopted in the pursuit of joy which brings, instead of joy, sorrow or disappointment. ... Nothing can take away joy from the man who has right understanding. Through all conditions of life he will retain it, but the one who lacks understanding, nothing in the world or Heaven there is which can bring him a lasting joy. This shows that, in reality, joy does not come from the external life, though always it seems so. Joy has only one source and that is the heart of man, which is the globe over his soul's light.

   ~~~ "Sangatha III, Tasawwuf ", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


The soul has the tendency to look forward to what is going to be, or at what has been in the past. It is the light of our soul, the intelligence that does this. Intelligence working through physical means is no greater than intellect. But intelligence working freely and independently from physical means is wisdom. And wisdom is not cleverness, but infinitely superior to it. Wisdom works independently of the physical means, and therefore, requires intuition. The clever person works by means of his physical body, but the wise person works independently of it.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_20.htm


The Qur'an says, 'God is the Light of the heavens and of the earth;' and if there is any spark of God that can be found in man, it is his intelligence. Naturally, therefore, when this divine light which is hidden in man is once brought to a blaze and has risen as a flame, it illuminates his path towards perfection.

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Katze on Nov 24, 2012 12:01 pm
Thank you for all your sharings of Saki !  :)

Nitewish  


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 22, 2013 11:30 am
Bowl of Saki for February 22
   

Life is an opportunity given to satisfy the hunger and thirst of the soul.
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik90.jpg)
                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

And what is life? Life is an opportunity. To the optimistic person the opportunity is a promise, and for the pessimistic person this opportunity is lost. It is not that the Creator makes man lose it, but it is man who withdraws himself from the possibility of seizing the opportunity.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_9.htm


If there is something that can be accomplished today, we need not wait for it to be accomplished tomorrow. For life is an opportunity, and desire has the greatest power, and perfection is the promise of the soul. We seek perfection, because perfection is the ultimate aim and the goal of creation. The source of all things is perfect. Our source is perfect, our goal is perfect. And therefore every atom of the universe is working towards perfection, and sooner or later it must arrive at perfection consciously. If it were not so, you would not have read in the Bible, 'Be ye perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_IV_10.htm


Kabir, the great poet of India says, 'Life is a field and you are born to cultivate it. And if you know how to cultivate this field you can produce anything you like. All the need of your life can be produced in this field. All that your soul yearns after and all you need is to be got from the field, if you know how to cultivate it and how to reap the fruit.' But if this opportunity is only studied in order to make the best of life by taking all that one can take and by being more comfortable, that is not satisfying. We must enrich ourselves with thought, with that happiness which is spiritual happiness, with that peace which belongs to our soul, with that liberty, that freedom, for which our soul longs; and attain to that higher knowledge which breaks all the fetters of life and raises our consciousness to look at life from a different point of view. Once a person has realized this opportunity he has fulfilled the purpose of Life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_16.htm



   ~~~ Life is an opportunity given to satisfy the hunger and thirst of the soul.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 21, 2013 08:24 pm
Dragonpie I wonder did this man live his life in Pakistan? We are very fortunate to have this wisdom trickling into our culture.
During for instance the Civil War we had limited access to other cultures. The 60's in America brought a renewal of cultural
influence from the East. Now it is open to us if we take the opportunity as Hazrat Khan said in your last post.

Jitendra


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 21, 2013 08:40 pm
Bowl of Saki for February 22
   

Life is an opportunity given to satisfy the hunger and thirst of the soul.
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik90.jpg)
                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

And what is life? Life is an opportunity. To the optimistic person the opportunity is a promise, and for the pessimistic person this opportunity is lost. It is not that the Creator makes man lose it, but it is man who withdraws himself from the possibility of seizing the opportunity.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_9.htm


If there is something that can be accomplished today, we need not wait for it to be accomplished tomorrow. For life is an opportunity, and desire has the greatest power, and perfection is the promise of the soul. We seek perfection, because perfection is the ultimate aim and the goal of creation. The source of all things is perfect. Our source is perfect, our goal is perfect. And therefore every atom of the universe is working towards perfection, and sooner or later it must arrive at perfection consciously. If it were not so, you would not have read in the Bible, 'Be ye perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_IV_10.htm


Kabir, the great poet of India says, 'Life is a field and you are born to cultivate it. And if you know how to cultivate this field you can produce anything you like. All the need of your life can be produced in this field. All that your soul yearns after and all you need is to be got from the field, if you know how to cultivate it and how to reap the fruit.' But if this opportunity is only studied in order to make the best of life by taking all that one can take and by being more comfortable, that is not satisfying. We must enrich ourselves with thought, with that happiness which is spiritual happiness, with that peace which belongs to our soul, with that liberty, that freedom, for which our soul longs; and attain to that higher knowledge which breaks all the fetters of life and raises our consciousness to look at life from a different point of view. Once a person has realized this opportunity he has fulfilled the purpose of Life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_16.htm



   ~~~ Life is an opportunity given to satisfy the hunger and thirst of the soul.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php

Here are the quotes about opportunity that you gave us Eric. Paramshansa Yogananda has a book out about India's poet
Kabir. Like Hazrat, he recognized the great spirituality in the poet Kabir.I see you requoted Kabir at the bottom. Comfort Iis not
satisfying. How many of us in the culture we live in actually realize this truth and continue our great opportunity?
J.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 09, 2013 05:33 am
Ah ! Alas, I can return to the unseen world and feel the comforts of Home surround me. My Saki, easily accessible to all and yet untampered with so that my Drink Remain For Seekers alike. From North to South and East to West, come- Sip and Relish on.

Today, again, we toast to the wisdoms of Mr. Inayat Khan.
And so, sometimes the simplest of understandings remain a float just above our Conscious- what was once an easy Hurdle is now a Profound Engagement to the Transformation that is our Lives.
Please, flip through these pages and Embrace the Alchemist within. It is my Hopes that my Saki be shared for those Who Wish To Drink.  :)
--------
Bowl of Saki for September 8
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik64.jpg)   

The soul is either raised or cast down by the power of its own thought, speech and action.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

One should say to the mind, 'Look here, you are my mind, you are my instrument. You are my slave and servant. You are here to help me, to work for me in this world. You have to listen to me. You will do whatever I wish. You will think whatever I wish. You will feel whatever I wish. You will not think or feel differently from my wishes, for you are my mind and you must prove in the end to be mine.' By doing this we begin to analyze our mind. We begin to see where it is wrong and where it is right. What is wrong in it and what is right in it; whether it is clouded, whether it is rusted, whether it has become too cool or whether it has become over-heated. We can train it ourselves, in accordance with its condition, and it is we who are the best trainers of our mind, better than anybody else in the world.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_II_15.htm


Each individual composes the music of his own life. If he injures another, he brings disharmony. When his sphere is disturbed, he is disturbed himself, and there is a discord in the melody of his life. If he can quicken the feeling of another to joy or to gratitude, by that much he adds to his own life; he becomes himself by that much more alive. Whether conscious of it or not, his thought is affected for the better by the joy or gratitude of another, and his power and vitality increase thereby, and the music of his life grows more in harmony.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_I_2.htm


The heart must be tuned to the stage and the pitch where one feels at-one-ment with persons, objects, and conditions. For instance, when one cannot bear the climate, it only means that one is not in harmony with the climate; when one cannot get on with persons, that one is not in harmony with them; when one cannot get on with certain affairs, that one is not in harmony with those affairs. If conditions seem hard, it shows that one is not in harmony with the conditions.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_37.htm


The most important subject to study in this whole life is ourselves. What we generally do is to criticize others, speak ill of them, or dislike them; but we always excuse ourselves. The right idea is to watch our own attitude, our own thought and speech and action, and to examine ourselves to see how we react upon all things in our favor and in our disfavor, to see whether we show wisdom and control in our reactions or whether we are without control and thought. Then we should also study our body, for by this we should learn that the body is not only a means of experiencing life by eating and drinking and making ourselves comfortable, but that it is the sacred temple of God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_9.htm



   ~~~ The soul is either raised or cast down by the power of its own thought, speech and action.


http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 10, 2014 06:04 pm
Bowl of Saki for January 10
 
  An ideal is beyond explanation. To analyze God is to dethrone God.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Belief is like a staircase. Each step takes one higher, but when one remains standing on a certain step of the staircase one does not progress. Belief may nail the feet to the ground and keep one there ... standing on a certain spot on a staircase. As a person evolves so his belief evolves, until he comes to that stage where he harmonizes with all the different beliefs, where he is no longer against any belief. Then he is not nailed down any more; he is above all the different beliefs. Very often a person says, 'I cannot understand what God is. Can you explain God to me? But if God were to be explained He would not be God. To explain God is to dethrone God.

God apart, can one explain anything fine and subtle such as gratitude, love, or devotion, in words? How much can be explained? Words are too inadequate to explain great feelings, so how can God be explained in words?

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_1.htm


Since to analyze God means to dethrone God, the less said on the subject the better. ... Everyone has his own imagination of God. It is best if everyone is left to his own imagination.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_30.htm


However religious or pious, he cannot explain God; not even a mystic or philosopher can explain Him. The ideal of God is the first lesson that must be learnt; and it cannot be learnt by analysis. Therefore the intellectual mind which seeks for an analysis of God is always sure to be disappointed. The philosopher spoke truly when he said, 'To analyze God is to dethrone God.' Analysis can never portray even the ideal of God. That is why every messenger, Muhammad, Christ, Moses, Abraham, emphasized the one word: faith. ...  It is the same with every ideal, even with the ideal of God. An ideal is beyond explanation.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_12.htm



   ~~~ An ideal is beyond explanation. To analyze God is to dethrone God.

 
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: brock on Feb 25, 2014 04:36 am
These are some very beautiful sayings.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 06, 2014 05:29 am
Man creates his own disharmony.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik9.jpg)
Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Feelings such as pride, conceit, selfishness, jealousy, envy and contempt are all feelings which hurt others and which destroy one's own life making it full of the misery which springs from that selfish personal feeling, that ego of man. The more egoistic, the more conceited he is, the more miserable a life he has in the world, the more he makes the lives of others miserable. ... it is in the world that, growing up, he creates all this and this creation is called nafs or ego. Yet at the same time in the depth of the heart there is that goodness which is the divine goodness, that righteousness which man has inherited from the Father in heaven. ...

Man creates his own disharmony in his soul and then treats others in the same way; therefore he is not satisfied with his own life, nor is he satisfied with others because he feels that he has a complaint against others, although mostly it is caused by himself. What he gives he receives back, but he never sees that. He always thinks: what the depth of his being yearns for -- love, goodness, righteousness, harmony and peace -- everybody must give to him. But for him when it comes to giving he does not give because he lives in the other life he has created. ...

But when a revolution comes in the life of a man, as soon as he begins to see deeply into life, to acquire goodness -- not only to get but to give -- as soon as he begins to enjoy not only the sympathy of others but giving sympathy to others, then comes a period when he begins to see this Satan-spirit as apart from his real original being, standing before him constantly in conflict with his natural force, freedom and inclination. ... The mystery of perfection lies in annihilation -- not in annihilation of the real self, but of the false self, of the false conception which man has cherished in his heart and always has allowed to torture his life. ...

God speaks to everyone, not only to the messengers and teachers. He speaks to the ears of every heart, but it is not every heart which hears it. His voice is louder than the thunder, and His light is clearer than the sun -- if one could only see it, if one could only hear it. In order to see it and in order to hear it man should remove this wall, this barrier which he has made of the self. Then he becomes the flute upon which the divine Player may play the music of Orpheus which can charm even the hearts of stone; then he rises from the cross into the life everlasting.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 08, 2014 07:13 am
Bowl of Saki for March 7
    
It is false love that does not uproot man's claim of "I"; the first and last lesson of love is "I am not".

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
It is not love, but the pretense of love, that imposes the claim of the self. The first and last lesson in love is, 'I am not -- Thou art' and unless man is moved to that selflessness he does not know justice, right or truth. His self stands above or between him and God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


There is no greater teacher of morals than love itself, for the first lesson that one learns from love is, 'I am not, you are.' This is self-denial, self-abnegation, without which we cannot take the first step on love's path. One may claim to be a great lover, to be a great admirer, to be very affectionate, but it all means nothing as long as the thought of self is there, for there is no love. But when the thought of self is removed, then every action, every deed that one performs in life, becomes a virtue.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_1.htm


He who says, 'I love you but only so much, I love you and give you sixpence but I keep sixpence for myself, I love you but I stand at a distance and never come closer, we are separate beings'- his love is with his self. As long as that exists, love has not done its full work. Love accomplishes its work when it spreads its wings and veils man's self from his own eyes. That is the time when love is fulfilled, and so it is in the life of the holy ones who have not only loved God by professing or showing it, but who have loved God to the extent that they forgot themselves.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_22.htm


Man is here on earth for this one purpose, that he may bring forth that spirit of God in him and thus discover his own perfection. The three stages towards this perfection are the following. The first stage is to make God as great and as perfect as your imagination can. ....

The second stage is the work of the heart... The first lesson that love teaches us is: 'I am not. Thou art.' The first thing to think of is to erase ourselves from our minds and to think of the one we love. As long as we do not arrive at this idea, so long the word love remains only in the dictionary. Many speak about love but very few know it. Is love a pastime, an amusement, a drama; is it a performance? The first lesson of love is sacrifice, service, self-effacement. ... To close the eyes for prayer is one thing, and to produce the love of God is another thing. That is the second stage in spiritual realization, where, in the thought of God, one begins to lose oneself in the same way that the lover loses the thought of self in the thought of the beloved.

And the third stage is different again. In the third stage the Beloved becomes the Self, and the self is there no more. For then the self, as we think it to be, no longer remains. The self becomes what it really is. It is that realization which is called Self-realization.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_30.htm



   ~~~ It is false love that does not uproot man's claim of "I"; the first and last lesson of love is "I am not".


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 09, 2014 07:13 pm
Bowl of Saki for April 9
 
  Things are worthwhile when we seek them; only then do we know their value.
             
Quote
         Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Very often people ask, 'How long has one to go on the spiritual path?' There is no limit to the length of this path, and yet if one is ready, it does not need a long time. It is a moment and one is there. How true it is, what the wise of past ages said to their followers, 'Do not go directly into the temple; first walk around it fifty times!' The meaning was, first get tired and then enter. Then you value it. One values something for which one makes an effort.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_IV_2.htm


The adept values his object of attaining the inner life more than anything else in life. As long as he does not really value it, so long he remains unable to attain it. That is the first condition: that man should value the inner life more than anything else in the world, more than wealth, power, position, rank, or anything else. It does not mean that in this world he should not pursue the things he needs. It means he should value most something which is really worthwhile.

The next thing is that when one begins to value something one thinks it is worthwhile giving time to it. For in the modern world it is said that time is money, and money today means the most valuable thing. So if a person gives his precious time to what he considers most worthwhile, more so than anything else in the world, then that is certainly the next step towards the inner life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_22.htm


There are really two journeys. There is the journey from the goal to the life in the world, and there is the journey from the life in the world to the goal. And both journeys are natural. As it is natural to go forth from the eternal goal, so it is natural to go from the changing life to the life which is unchangeable.

Which is the most desirable thing in life, to seek for the goal or to dwell in this changing life? The answer is that every person's desire is according to his evolution. That for which he is ready is desirable for him. Milk is a desirable food for the infant, other foods for the grown-up person. Every stage in life has its own appropriate and desirable things. The desire to attain to a goal must be there before reaching it; when he does not feel the desire, it is not necessary for a man to seek it. All things are worthwhile when we seek after them; then only do we appreciate their value; then only are we happy to have them.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_30.htm



   ~~~ Things are worthwhile when we seek them; only then do we know their value.

 
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 19, 2014 02:55 pm
Quote
Everybody has an ideal in life, and that ideal is the religion of his soul

(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik4.jpg)
The soul's true happiness lies in experiencing the inner joy, and it will never be fully satisfied with outer, seeming pleasures. Its connection is with God, and nothing short of perfection will ever satisfy it.



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 20, 2014 10:54 am
Quote
Everybody has an ideal in life, and that ideal is the religion of his soul

(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik4.jpg)
The soul's true happiness lies in experiencing the inner joy, and it will never be fully satisfied with outer, seeming pleasures. Its connection is with God, and nothing short of perfection will ever satisfy it.



Spiritually speaking we are always being 'tweaked' for me the biggest impediments are dry periods and challenging circumstances that seemingly rob our spiritual aspirations. Yet i have always heard these are tests along the way.
This is what makes a saint: They never gave up.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 11, 2014 10:17 pm
Bowl of Saki for December 11
    
When the artist loses himself in his art, then the art comes to life.
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik60.jpg)
                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

One must not only be an artist; one must become art itself. Then to the one who is so absorbed in his work that he forgets himself, that capacity, that intuition, that skill will come naturally. He begins to do wonders, and his art becomes a perfect expression of what he had in mind. ...  People think that it is the artist who has made it; in reality, it is God who has perfected it. As it is God's pleasure to create the world, so it is also God's pleasure to create through pen and brush and chisel, to give life to what is lifeless.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_8.htm


The artist who has arrived at some perfection in his art, whatever his art may be, will come to realize that it is not he who ever achieved anything; it is someone else who came forward every time. And when the artist produces a perfect thing, he finds it difficult to imagine that it has been produced by him. He can do nothing but bow his head in humility before that unseen power and wisdom which takes his body, his heart, his brain, and his eyes as its instrument. Whenever beauty is produced in art, be it music, or poetry, or painting, or writing, or anything else, one must never think that man produced it. It is through man that God completes His creation. Thus there is nothing that is done in this world or in heaven that is not divine immanence, which is not divine creation. ...

What is art? Art is the creation of beauty in whatever form it is created. As long as an artist thinks that whatever he creates in the form of art is his own creation, and as long as he is vain about his creation, he has not learned true art. True art can only come on one condition, and that is that the artist forgets himself -- that he forgets himself in the vision of beauty. ... We are vehicles or instruments that respond. If we respond to goodness, goodness becomes our property. If we respond to evil, then evil becomes our property. If we respond to love, then love becomes our possession.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_3.htm



   ~~~ When the artist loses himself in his art, then the art comes to life.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Dec 11, 2014 10:51 pm
Thank - You

What Hazrat Khan says about art here means a lot to me. It is an example of how are attitude should be in creating. i have never heard it said with so much humility..

..."And when the artist produces a perfect thing, he finds it difficult to imagine that it has been produced by him. He can do nothing but bow his head in humility before that unseen power and wisdom which takes his body, his heart, his brain, and his eyes as its instrument. Whenever beauty is produced in art, be it music, or poetry, or painting, or writing, or anything else, one must never think that man produced it. It is through man that God completes His creation."


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 31, 2014 06:23 pm
...In all ages the various religions have given different standards of good and evil, calling them virtue and sin. The virtue of one nation has been the sin of another. The virtue of the latter is the sin of the former. Travel as we may through the world, or read the histories and traditions of nations as we may, we shall still find that what one calls evil, another calls good. That is why no one can succeed in making a universal standard for good and evil. The discrimination between good and evil is in man's soul. Every man can judge that for himself, because in every man is the sense of admiration of beauty. But he is not satisfied with what he does himself, he feels a discomfort, a disgust with his own efforts. There are many people who continue some weakness or some mistake, or who are intoxicated by some action which the world calls evil or which they themselves call evil, yet go on doing it. But a day comes when they also are disgusted. Then they wish for suicide. There is no more happiness for them. Happiness only lies in thinking or doing that which one considers beautiful. Such an act becomes a virtue or goodness. That goodness is beauty.

    

Happiness lies in thinking or doing that which one considers beautiful.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

What is really good? The answer is, there is no such thing as good or evil. There is beauty. That which is beautiful, we call good. That which is ugly compared with the beautiful, we call evil: whether it is custom, idea, thought or action. This shows that this whole phenomenon of the universe is the phenomenon of beauty. Every soul has an inclination to admire beauty, to seek for beauty, to love beauty, and to develop beauty. Even God loves beauty.

Man is always seeking for beauty, and yet he is unaware of the treasure of beauty that is hidden in his own heart. He strives after it throughout his whole life. It is as if he was in pursuit of the horizon: the further he proceeds, the further the horizon seems to have moved away. For there are two aims: the one is real, and the other false. That which is false is momentary, transitory, and unreliable - wealth, power, fame, and position are all snatched from one hand by the other. ... Man wants something in life upon which he can rely; and this shows, whether he believes in a deity or not, that he is constantly seeking for God. He seeks for Him not knowing that he is seeking for God. Nevertheless, every soul is pursuing some reality, something to hold on to; trying to grasp something which will prove dependable, a beauty that cannot change and that one can always look upon as one's own, a beauty that one feels will last forever. And where can one find it? Within one's own heart. And it is the art of finding that beauty, of developing, improving, and spreading that beauty through life, allowing it to manifest before the inner and outer view, which one calls the art of the mystic.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_3.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 19, 2016 10:47 pm
fast forward to tomorrows wisdoms for today  ;D
(http://amytorresacim.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/sufiheart.jpg)
To treat every human being as a shrine of God is to fulfill all religion.

     Bowl of Saki, January 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
Where is the shrine of God? It is in the heart of man. As soon as one begins to consider the feelings of another, one begins to worship God. ... There is a story of a murshid who was going with his mureeds to visit some village, and he was keeping a fast. The mureeds also had taken a vow of fasting. They arrived at the peasants' home where there was great enthusiasm and happiness and where a dinner was arranged for them. When they were invited to the table, the murshid went and sat down; but the mureeds did not dare because they had taken a vow of fasting. Yet they would never mention it to the murshid. They thought, 'Murshid is forgetful; Murshid has forgotten the vow.' After dinner was over and they went out the pupils asked, 'Did you not forget the vow of fasting?' 'No,' was the murshid's answer, 'I had not forgotten. But I preferred breaking the fast rather than the heart of that man who with all his enthusiasm had prepared the food.'

The thirst for life makes us overlook little opportunities of doing good. Every moment of life brings an opportunity for being conscious of human feeling, in prosperity, in adversity, in all conditions. It costs very little; only a little thought is necessary. ... There is no greater religion than love. God is love; and the best form of love is to be conscientious regarding the feelings of those with whom we come in contact in everyday life.
        from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_13.htm
(https://rabbaniway.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/mevlana_wajd-ecstasy-sufism.jpg)
Quote
How beautiful are the words of the Prophet: 'The shrine of God is the heart of man.' How true that is! ... He who understands this can worship God even in man. For when he abides by this philosophy he will always be aware that in every aspect and at every moment he may be injuring or hurting the feelings of God, that he is in danger of breaking the shrine of God in breaking the heart of his fellow man. ... What does all this teach us? It is all a lesson in sympathy for one's fellow man, to teach us to share in his troubles, in his despair. For whoever really experiences this joy of life, finds that it becomes so great that it fills his heart and his soul. It does not matter if he has fewer comforts or an inferior position than many in this world, because the light of his kindness, of his sympathy, of the love that is growing, the virtue that is springing up in his heart, all fill the soul with light. There is nothing now that he lacks in life, for he has become the king of it.
          from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_1.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 11, 2016 07:53 pm

Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php




Well now... I do believe I've already shared this lovely insight from Hazrat Inayat Khan... Oh dear!

Perhaps I drink too heavily  ;D


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 15, 2016 06:04 am

Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php




Well now... I do believe I've already shared this lovely insight from Hazrat Inayat Khan... Oh dear!

Perhaps I drink too heavily  ;D

Eric i found this to be an interesting quote: "So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves."

i believe many of us have glimpses of this in others. The difficulty arises when our glimpses do not correlate with the outer conformation. This is somewhat confusing and i have not come to terms with it yet... perhaps i will though. When Amma 'sees' those she blesses she sees that part of them that is God she is able to look beyond the rest. Can you imagine that? To actually see God in others and not what most people see in their brothers and sisters in the world. How can we cultivate that kind of love? It is part of a higher consciousness to want to see more of what i have had glimpses of in others i have known and met.

And this quote; "When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are."

Today i practiced music with a woman who is a true poet. Her vibration still lingers on within in me. It is as though we feel the presence of people who emanate something profound. It surrounds us and seeps into us as well.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 30, 2016 10:56 pm
This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 31, 2016 12:43 am
This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"


While i have been inspired by much of the Sufis posts... There are obviously some differences of view Eric. i must say that if it was not for the spiritual meditation techniques of the east i would still not find much pleasure in meditation. These techniques that were developed by the gurus have helped me interiorize and feel the presence of peace and at times joy and have exposed me to realms and miracles i honestly can say would not be possible with out their help. They were specifically given to Chelas (devotees) and there is help from those Masters and blessings in practice. i have indeed witnessed this help at Ammas and Yoganandas ashrams and in seeing them. i have evidence of the miracles assocaited with being in their presence and practicing their techniques.

Seeking the presence and finding the presence of God comes with the peace that is the first sign of Gods presence. i feel this peace associated with God's presence quite regularly. Deeper states of meditation... hearing the om...hearing the heavenly music... seeing the light and merging into a larger presence are all experiences associated with the gurus, Masters and meditation. Soon i will write what Amma had to say about having a Guru. i would be interested to know your response.

However i will end this statement with an important point. Every path for each individual is their own. i have no rite to question your views or your practices only to stand up for my own. We are grateful for your posts and your point of view Eric!

This video below can give you and idea of what it is like to meet or be in the presence of a great Spiritual Master and given His/Her blessings:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lc5fGW7O0Gs


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: b on Mar 31, 2016 02:05 am
This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"


This is significant. My understanding is that if a person can feel this, then they have no need of methods. If they don't feel this then methods are devised. As Steve said, it is entirely individual. I think mass instruction is a bit of a compromise.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 31, 2016 07:47 pm

We have really appreciated these inspirational talks from the Bowl of Saki. Occasional differing views are hopefully accepted. i have always hoped to accept them in others. Perhaps i voice them quite strongly sometimes though. Do u think that is the case? If Hazrat Inayat Khan was here now talking with us i have  a feeling that a man of that spiritual status would be receptive to other peoples spiritual values. He just seems unprejudiced in that sense. So that's something to think about!


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 05, 2016 09:29 pm
hi steve,i think you're right. perhaps because from the spiritual views of others there is a recognizable truth shared among them.

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik32.jpg)   
Enviable is he who loveth and asketh no return.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

A person is apt to think, 'Why should I perform actions that bring me no return? Why should I be kind, where no kindness is shown to me, where there is even no appreciation?' In this way he commercializes his kindness: he gives in order to receive. ... When one loves one must love for the sake of love, not for a return. When one serves one must serve for the sake of service, not for acknowledgement. In everything a person does, if he does not think of reciprocity or appreciation in any manner or form, he may perhaps seem a loser in the beginning, but in the end that person will be the gainer, for he has lived in the world and yet held himself above the world; it cannot touch him.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_28.htm



   ~~~ Enviable is he who loveth and asketh no return.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php

sufism has existed before inayat khan, christianity, judaism or islam


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Dec 06, 2016 02:14 am
Reciprocity.

I have a comment Eric. i can agree on what he is saying accept for this word. We can easily find projects that are more meaningful if someone misuses us. For most of us we can also find people who are appreciative so there is really no use in giving to something that only goes down the drain. Let us think this one out a bit. We only have so many hours in a day. Why waste it on people who have little regard for others? It is best to put our energies where they can grow and we can really help others. Some people do not want our help nor do they even understand it. There are also those who we may spend time with who will willingly drain your energies, money and service with little or no regard for you. Eric you sell cars. I do not think you would continue your service without the reciprocity and acknowledgement of your service by being payed for your services. Your very survival depends on it. Is this 'commertializing' your services?

There have been people who have entered my life and who I spent a lot of time with that actually discouraged spiritual life. I really need to recognize that they have no intentions of meditating and would only discourage my efforts. I may enjoy their company but they have a lack of understanding of me and thus can show no reciprocity and actually discourage my spiritual efforts. Haven't you found this true also? When and if they call again I certainly will be friendly and give them a chance again, as I would like to be given, but to not listen to the voice of experience is to be knocked over the head over and over. So to spend very much time with them will only enable them to continue their lifestyle and stifle my own.

I will say this though... A Master has no need for reciprocity since he already has everything he could possibly want yet even as disciples we can help/support a Master's goals and projects here on earth. I wonder how others respond to my comments. Hazrat Inayat Khan has been a refreshing inspiration here at the portal. I may not agree or understand what he has said at various times. That does not take from the significance of his wisdom.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 10, 2016 03:00 am
hi steve,

i'm glad you find wisdom from these inspirational messages. cheers.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 29, 2016 05:21 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik53.jpg)   
A gain or a loss which is momentary is not real; if we knew realities we should never grieve over the loss of anything that experience shows to be only transitory.

     Bowl of Saki, December 29, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
In life we discriminate between two things: the real and the false. We think more of the real and less of the false. We discriminate between imitation gold and real gold; we pay more for the real gold because it is more lasting. The two samples of gold may be equally bright; hence it is evident that the value we attach to things is in proportion to their lasting power. Similarly, if we could see what things in life are lasting or passing, we should discriminate between real loss and false loss, real gain and false gain. The gain or loss which is momentary is not real. So, too, joy or sorrow is a momentary state; the joy over a gain today may tomorrow prove to be a sorrow. If we knew the realities, we should never grieve over the loss of things which experience shows to be only of a transient character. ... For every gain, however, there is a need for sacrifice. To gain anything we have to sacrifice something; to pursue two gains is to lose both. Therefore it is necessary to decide once and for all what is false, and then to follow the real and leave the false.

If there is such a thing as saintly renunciation, it is renouncing small gains for better gains; not for no gains, but seeing with open eyes what is better and what is inferior. Even if the choice has to lie between two momentary gains, one of these would always be found to be more real and lasting; that is the one that should be followed for the time. When we take the torch of wisdom to show us our path through life, we will end by realizing what is really profitable in life and what is not.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 13, 2017 02:16 am
Peace is perfected activity; that is perfect which is complete in all its aspects, balanced in each direction and under complete control of the will. (https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik91.jpg)

  Bowl of Saki, January 12, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
...
Peace is independently felt within oneself. It is not dependent upon the outer sensation. It is something that belongs to one, something that is one's own self.

...
The secret of mysticism, the mystery of philosophy, all is to be attained after the attainment of peace. You cannot refuse to recognize the divine in a person who is a person of peace.

...
And now the question is what makes one lack peace? The answer is, love of sensation. A person who is always seeking to experience life in movement, in activity, in whatever form, wants more and more of that experience. In the end he becomes dependent upon the life which is outside, and so he loses in the end his peace, the peace which is his real self. ... the first thing is to seek the kingdom of God within ourselves, in which there is our peace. As soon as we have found that, we have found our support, we have found our self. And in spite of all the activity and movement on the surface, we shall be able to keep that peace undisturbed if only we hold it fast by becoming conscious of it.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 23, 2017 08:28 pm
I am witnessing a confirmation of sorts. Steve there was a bit on relaxation that you had mentioned and the same day the bowl of saki had something to say on it as well. All of last night and this morning my thoughts have been on will power and liberty. Steve, your efforts in meditation and being a vegetarian to me means you're living, in part, according to your will. In this world of distraction, to many people do not live according to their own will. I regrettably, am one of these people.

Today the Saki confirms my thoughts... Just as you have unknowingly confirmed mine Steve. My mind is making connections with the world around me. Thoughts and desires to satisfy something on deeper level are being confirmed in a "coincidental way". I do not believe it is my mind alone when my mind can not control what others say or do. I also do not think it's a trick of the mind when I coincidentally pull behind a car with a bumper sticker that reassures these thoughts on two separate occasions, different times and place- instantaneously...
Okay I will post the sake below this to keep it organized:


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 23, 2017 08:32 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik11.jpg)
Success comes when reason, the store of experience, surrenders to will.
   Bowl of Saki, January 23, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

A learned person without will power is like a head without a body.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/gayan_boulas.htm


Common sense is necessary in the path of attainment, but not to such an extent that the reason should dominate and lead the will. The will, in action, must lead the reason, whereas if the reason is allowed to lead the will, the will many times becomes paralyzed. But when in cooperation the will leads the reason, then the path of attainment becomes illuminated.

   ~~~ "Githa I, Sadhana 5", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


Reason is learned from the ever changing world, but wisdom comes from the essence of life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/gayan_boulas.htm


Reason is the master of the unbeliever and the servant of the believer.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/say/gayan_chalas.htm


In order to see this question more clearly one must picture oneself as two beings, one the king and the other the servant. When one of them expresses a wish, it is the king who wishes. And the part that says, 'I cannot,' is the servant. If the servant has his way, then the king is in the place of the servant. And the more the servant has his way, the more the servant rules and the king obeys. In this way naturally conflict arises and that reflects upon the outer life. One's whole life becomes unlucky. One may be pious or good or religious, it makes no difference. If man does not realize the kingdom of God within himself nor realize his spirit to be a king, he does not accomplish the purpose of life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_28.htm



   ~~~ Success comes when reason (the store of experience) surrenders to will.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 23, 2017 08:33 pm
Quote
... if the reason is allowed to lead the will, the will many times becomes paralyzed.

This is what I am experiencing now...


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 28, 2017 11:13 pm
Sincerity is the jewel that forms in the shell of the heart.

     Bowl of Saki, January 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Very few realize what power sincerity carries. A false man, however physically strong he is or however great is his willpower, is kept down by his falsehood; it never allows him to rise. It eats into him because it is rust. Those who have done great things in life, in whatever walk of life it be, have done them by the power of truth, the power of sincerity.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_31.htm


Sincerity is the principal thing in life. Youth is the age which is most attracted to superficiality. That is the reason why many youths adopt an artificial manner of thought, speech and action, which is very undesirable and does not benefit their life. It is important to inculcate sincerity in the character of the youth. To give a youth a love of sincerity is extremely useful, for the power of sincerity can work miracles.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_I_6.htm


The more sincerity is developed, the greater share of truth you will have. And however much sincerity a person may have, there is always a gap to fill, for we live in the midst of falsehood, and we are always apt to be carried away by this world of falsehood. Therefore we must never think we are sincere enough, and we must always be on our guard against influences which may carry us away from that sincerity which is the bridge between ourselves and our ideal. No study, no meditation is more helpful than sincerity itself.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Classes for Mureeds I", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)



   ~~~ Sincerity is the jewel that forms in the shell of the heart.

https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 29, 2017 10:26 pm
Self-pity is the worst poverty; it overwhelms man until he sees nothing but illness, trouble and pain.

     Bowl of Saki, January 29, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
If one studies one's surroundings one finds that those who are happy are so because they have less thought of self. If they are unhappy it is because they think of themselves too much. A person is more bearable when he thinks less of himself. And a person is unbearable when he is always thinking of himself. There are many miseries in life, but the greatest misery is self-pity.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_29.htm


Man is mostly selfish, and what interests him is that which concerns his own life. Not knowing the troubles of the lives of others he feels the burden of his own life even more than the burden of the whole world. If only man in his poverty could think that there are others who are poorer than he, in his illness that there are others whose sufferings are perhaps greater than his, in his troubles that there are others whose difficulties are perhaps greater than his! Self-pity is the worst poverty. It overwhelms man and he sees nothing but his own troubles and pains, and it seems to him that he is the most unhappy person in the world, more so than anyone else.

A great thinker of Persia, Sa'di, writes in an account of his life, 'Once I had no shoes, I had to walk barefoot in the hot sand, and how miserable I was. Then I met a man who was lame, for whom walking was very difficult. I bowed down to heaven at once and offered thanks that I was much better off than he who had not even feet to walk upon.' This shows that it is not a man's situation in life, but his attitude towards life that makes him happy or unhappy.  ...

When Jesus Christ said, 'Seek ye first the kingdom of God,' this teaching was an answer to the cry of humanity: some crying, 'I have no wealth,' others crying, 'I have no rest,' others crying, 'My situation in life is difficult,' My friends are troubling me,' or, 'I want a position, wealth.' The answer to them all is, 'Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and all these things shall be added unto you.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_40.htm



   ~~~ Self-pity is the worst poverty; it overwhelms man until he sees nothing but illness, trouble and pain.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jan 30, 2017 02:20 am
"If one studies one's surroundings one finds that those who are happy are so because they have less thought of self. If they are unhappy it is because they think of themselves too much. A person is more bearable when he thinks less of himself. And a person is unbearable when he is always thinking of himself. There are many miseries in life, but the greatest misery is self-pity."

There is so much wisdom here! Meditation helps us think less of ourselves and expands our awareness to think of others and higher realities then the body and mind which we attach ourselves too a fancy them as our identity.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 30, 2017 08:45 pm
If I am not my body or mind then what am I?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 31, 2017 02:17 am
The heart is not living until it has experienced pain.

     Bowl of Saki, January 30, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Those who have avoided love in life from fear of its pain have lost more than the lover, who by losing himself gains all. The loveless first lose all, until at last their self is also snatched away from their hands. The warmth of the lover's atmosphere, the piercing effect of his voice, the appeal of his words, all come from the pain of his heart. The heart is not living until it has experienced pain. Man has not lived if he has lived and worked with his body and mind without heart. The soul is all light, but all darkness is caused by the death of the heart. Pain makes it alive. The same heart that was once full of bitterness, when purified by love becomes the source of all goodness. All deeds of kindness spring from it.

A person who has never experienced pain cannot sympathize with those suffering pain. ... Sympathy is something more than love and affection, for it is the knowledge of a certain suffering which moves the living heart to sympathy.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_21.htm


Suffering is always a blessing. If it is for higher ideas, for God, for an ideal, it takes a person at once to the highest heaven. If it is for lower ideas, for the ego, for pride, for possessions, it takes a person to the lowest depth of hell. But there, after much suffering, after a long, long time, he loses these ideas and is purified. That is why the Christian religion shows the symbol of the cross, of suffering. How high our ideal may be, how low our ideal may be, in the end each pain has its prize.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


If there were no pain, one would not have the experience of joy. It is pain which helps one to experience joy. Everything is distinguished by its opposite and the one who feels pain deeply is more capable of expressing joy. If there were no pain, life would be most uninteresting; for it is by pain that penetration takes place, and the sensation after pain is a deeper joy. Without pain the great musicians, athletes, discoverers, and thinkers would not have reached the stage they have arrived at in the world. If they had always experienced joy, they would not have touched the depths of life.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_17.htm



   ~~~ The heart is not living until it has experienced pain.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 31, 2017 03:18 pm
Good Morning! =) Here's to a Blessed Day.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/01_31_17.jpg)

Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

The heart of man, as the Sufis say, is a mirror. All that is reflected in this mirror is projected upon other mirrors. When man has doubt in his heart that doubt is reflected upon every heart with which he comes in contact. When he has faith that faith is reflected in every heart. Can there be a more interesting study and a greater wonder than to observe this keenly?

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_16.htm


There must be no feeling of revenge, of unkindness, of bitterness against anyone in the heart. When such a feeling comes, one must say: this is rust coming into my heart. When all such feelings are cleared off the heart, it becomes like a mirror. A mirror without rust reflects all that is before it; then everything divine is reflected in the heart.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_14.htm


The heart aflame becomes the torch on the path of the lover, which lightens his way that leads him to his destination. The pleasures of life are blinding, it is love alone that clears the rust from the heart, the mirror of the soul.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_22.htm



   ~~~ The pleasures of life are blinding; it is love alone that clears the rust from the heart, the mirror of the soul.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 03, 2017 08:22 pm
Just a small excerpt from todays Saki drink for your consideration! =) Namaste  :)

For the Sufi there is one principle which is most essential to be remembered and that is consideration for human feeling. If one practices in his life this one principle he need not learn much more; he need not trouble about philosophy, he need not follow an old or a new religion, for this principle in itself is the essence of all religions. God is love, but where does God dwell? He abides in the heart of man.

   ~~~ "Sangatha I, Khawas", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Feb 04, 2017 09:54 pm
Just a small excerpt from todays Saki drink for your consideration! =) Namaste  :)

For the Sufi there is one principle which is most essential to be remembered and that is consideration for human feeling. If one practices in his life this one principle he need not learn much more; he need not trouble about philosophy, he need not follow an old or a new religion, for this principle in itself is the essence of all religions. God is love, but where does God dwell? He abides in the heart of man.

   ~~~ "Sangatha I, Khawas", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php

While i do see the importance of this last quote i have found also that with some people it is like walking on egg shells when you are with them--you do not know how you may offend their ego.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 09, 2017 12:48 am
Love manifests towards those whom we like as love; towards those whom we do not like as forgiveness.

     Bowl of Saki, February 8, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

"...One cannot arrive at true nobility of spirit if one is not prepared to forgive the imperfections of human nature. For all men, whether worthy or unworthy, require forgiveness, and only in this way can one rise above the lack of harmony and beauty."
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 11, 2017 01:53 am
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

All planes of existence consist of vibrations, from the finest to the grossest kind; the vibrations of each plane have come from a higher one, and have become grosser. Whoever knows the mystery of vibrations, he indeed knows all things. ... From the scientific standpoint, spirit and matter are quite different from each other, but according to the philosophical point of view they are one. Spirit and matter are different, just as water is different from snow; yet again they are not different, for snow is nothing other than water. When spiritual vibrations become more dense they turn into matter, and when material vibrations become finer they develop into spirit.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_1.htm


All existing things we see or hear, which we perceive, vibrate. If it were not for vibration, the precious stones would not show us their color and their brilliance; it is vibration which makes the tree grow, the fruit ripen, and the flowers bloom. Our existence is also according to the law of vibrations, not only the existence of our physical body but also our thoughts and feelings. ... When we begin to see life from this point of view it will appear that birth and death are only our conceptions of life, that there is no such thing as death and that all is living. It only changes from one form to the other, subject to the law of vibrations.

  from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_I_3.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Feb 11, 2017 05:22 am
There is a thought that plays with this idea of vbration that many of us have not entertained; That is the closer we get to others the more we mingle with their vibration. A sobering thought.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 11, 2017 08:34 pm
Our likes and infatuations have a certain limit; when their time has expired the period of indifference commences. When the water of indifference is drunk, then there is no more wish for anything in the world. The nature of the water one drinks in this world is that one's thirst is quenched for a certain time and then comes again. When the water of divine knowledge is drunk, then thirst never comes again. ... Indifference, however, must be reached after interest has taken its course; before that moment it is a fault. A person without an interest in life becomes exclusive, he becomes disagreeable. Indifference must come after all experience - interest must end in indifference. Man must not take the endless path of interest: the taste of everything in the world becomes flat. Man must realize that all he seeks in the objects he runs after, that all beauty and strength, are in himself, and he must be content to feel them all in himself. ... Vairagya means satisfaction, the feeling that no desire is to be satisfied any more, that nothing on earth is desired. This is a great moment, and then comes that which is the kingdom of God.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_9.htm

Vairagi means a person who has become indifferent; and yet indifference is not the word for it. It describes a person who has lost the value in his eyes of all that attracts the human being. It is no more attractive to him; it no more enslaves him. He may still be interested in all things of this life, but is not bound to them. ... No affair of this world, no relation, no friendship, no wealth, no rank, position or comfort, nothing holds him. And yet that does not mean that he in any way lacks what is called love or kindness, for if ever he lives in this world it is only out of love. He is not interested in the world and it is only love that keeps him here, the love which does not express itself any more in the way of attachment, but only in the way of kindness, forgiveness, generosity, service, consideration, sympathy, helpfulness, in any way that it can; never expecting a return from the world, but ever doing all that it can, pitying the conditions, knowing the limitations of life and its continual changeability.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_II_9.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 15, 2017 11:24 pm
Man forms his future by his actions. His every good or bad action spreads its vibrations and becomes known throughout the universe. The more spiritual a man is, the stronger and clearer are the vibrations of his actions, which spread over the world and weave his future. The universe is like a dome: it vibrates to that which you say in it, and echoes the same back to you. So also is the law of action: we reap what we sow.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_1.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 17, 2017 08:32 pm
Happy Friday Fam  :)

Anyone who has some knowledge of mysticism and of the lives of the mystics knows that what always attracts the mystic most is nature. Nature is his bread and wine. Nature is his soul's nourishment. Nature inspires him, uplifts him and gives him the solitude for which his soul continually longs. Every soul born with a mystical tendency is constantly drawn towards nature. In nature that soul finds its life's demand, as it is said in the Vadan, 'Art is dear to my heart, but nature is near to my soul.'...

From the moment man's eyes open and he begins to read the book of nature he begins to live; and he continues to live forever.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_7.htm

As one goes further in the soul's unfoldment one finally arrives at the stage of revelation. Life begins to reveal itself, the whole of life, each soul becomes communicative -- not only living beings but each thing. They say that the twelve apostles knew all languages. It does not mean that they knew English, French and Italian, but that they knew every soul's language, as every soul has its own separate language. They began to perceive vibrations and so every evolved soul will feel the vibrations of every other soul, and every condition, every soul, every object in the world will reveal its nature and character to him. Sa'di, the Persian poet, has said, 'Once a soul has begun to read, every leaf of the tree becomes as a page of the sacred book of life'.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_19.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 18, 2017 06:50 pm
The Sufi therefore, finds the only way out of the distress of life... He rises above it, taking all things as they come, patiently. He does not mind how he is treated. His principle is to do his best, and in that is his satisfaction. Instead of depending on another person to be kind to him, the Sufi thinks if he were kind to another person, that is sufficient. Every wise man in the long run through life will find in this principle the solution of happiness. For we cannot change the world, but we can change ourselves.

   ~~~ "Sangatha II, Path To Perfection", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

The other day I lectured in Paris and after my lecture a very able man came to me and said, 'Have you got a scheme?' I said, 'What scheme?' 'Of bettering conditions.' I replied that I had not made such a scheme, and he said, 'I have a scheme, I will show it to you'. He opened his box and brought out a very large paper with mathematics on it and showed it to me saying, 'This is the economic scheme that will make the condition of the world better: everyone will have the same share'. I said, 'We should practice that economic scheme first on tuning our piano: instead of saying D, E, F, we should tune them all to one note and play that music and see how interesting that would be -- all sounding the same, no individuality, no distinction, nothing.' And I added, 'Economy is not a plan for construction, but it is a plan for destruction. It is economics which have brought us to destruction. It is the heart quality, it is the spiritual outlook which will change the world'.

Very often people coming to hear me say afterwards, 'Yes, all you say is very interesting, very beautiful, and I wish too that the world was changed. But how many think like you? How can you do it? How can it be done?'. They come with that pessimistic remark, and I tell them, 'One person comes into a country with a little cold or influenza and it spreads. If such a bad thing can spread, can not an elevated thought of love, kindness and goodwill towards all men spread? See then that there are finer germs, germs of goodwill, of love, kindness, and feeling, germs of brotherhood, of the desire for spiritual evolution, which can have greater results than the other ones. If we all have that optimistic view, if we all work in our little way, we can accomplish a great deal'.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_8.htm


Many have been cross with God for having sent any misery in their lives -- but we always get such experiences! Becoming cross one says, 'Why, this is not just', or 'This is not right', and 'How could God who is just and good allow unjust things to happen?' But our sight is so limited that our conception of right and wrong and good and evil is only for us -- not according to God's plan. It is true that, as long as we see it as such, it is so for us and for those who look at it from our point of view, but when it comes to God the whole dimension is changed, the whole point of view is changed.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_12.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 23, 2017 07:23 pm
...

By changing his own nature, by making himself more truthful, he disperses the clouds of falsehood within and without, and begins to see life as it really is both inwardly and outwardly. From this time onwards, the meaning of religion becomes clear. One begins to understand what the great teachers have taught. Then one becomes tolerant to the various religions. Nothing seems strange any more. Nothing surprises. For now one begins to know the innermost nature of man; one sees the cause behind every action.

   ~~~ "Supplementary papers, Philosophy V", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


People speak about truth and falsehood, but once the mystic has reached the truth, all is truth to him; then everything is a phenomenon of truth, a picture of truth. For instance, a person looking at a picture may distinguish light and shade, but another instead of speaking of light and shade, will say, 'This is a portrait of so and so, it is a very good picture, exactly like him.' Truth is like this; and so to a mystic the whole of life is a picture of the divine Beloved.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_18.htm



   ~~~ Truth alone can succeed; falsehood is a waste of time and loss of energy.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 27, 2017 08:04 pm
Where there is no conviction there is nothing. The secret of healing, the mystery of evolving, the power of all attainments, and the way to spiritual realization, all come from the strengthening of that belief which is a conviction, so that nothing can ever change it.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_30.htm

Believe in God with childlike faith; for simplicity with intelligence is the sign of the Holy Ones.

     Bowl of Saki, February 27, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik12.jpg)



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 01, 2017 07:25 pm
Nature speaks louder than the call from the minaret.

     Bowl of Saki, March 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

The deeper we look into life the more it unfolds itself, allowing us to see more keenly. Life is revealing. It is not only human beings who speak; if only the ears can hear even plants and trees and all nature speak, in the sense that nature reveals itself, reveals its secret. In this way we communicate with the whole of life. Then we are never alone, then life becomes worth living.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_15.htm

One may ask, what should one study? There are two kinds of studies. One kind is by reading the teachings of the great thinkers and keeping them in mind, the study of metaphysics, psychology, and mysticism. And the other kind of study is the study of life. Every day one has an opportunity for studying; but it should be a correct study. When a person travels in a tramcar, in the train, with a newspaper in his hand, he wants to read the sensational news which is worth nothing. He should read human nature which is before him, people coming and going. If he would continue to do this, he would begin to read human beings as though they were letters written by the divine pen, which speak of their past and future. He should look deeply at the heavens and at nature and at all the things to be seen in everyday life, and reflect upon them with the desire to understand. This kind of study is much superior, incomparably superior, to the study of books.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_15.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 16, 2017 08:37 pm
   At every step of evolution, man's realization of God changes.

     Bowl of Saki, March 16, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

There is a time when toys are treasures. But the child who cries for a toy comes to an age when he gives it away. And at every step in a man's evolution the values of power and position and wealth change in his eyes. And so as he evolves there arises in him a spirit of renunciation which may be called the Spirit of God. Gradually he recognizes the real value of those fair and lovely qualities of the spirit that change not.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_II_15.htm


Every step in evolution makes life more valuable. The more evolved you are, the more priceless is every moment; it becomes an opportunity for you to do good to others, to serve others, to give love to others, to be gentle to others, to give your sympathy to souls who are longing and hungering for it. Life is miserable when a person is absorbed in himself.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm


In selfishness there is an illusion of profit, but in the end the profit attained by selfishness proves to be worthless. Life is the principal thing to consider, and true life is the inner life, the realization of God, the consciousness of one's spirit. When the human heart becomes conscious of God it turns into the sea and it spreads; it extends the waves of its love to friend and foe. Spreading further and further it attains perfection.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_15.htm


The one who in the shrine of his heart has seen the vision of God, the one who has the realization of truth, can only smile, for words can never really explain what truth means. The nearest explanation one can give is that truth is realization. At every step of man's evolution his realization changes, but there is a stage where man arrives at the true realization, a realization which is a firm conviction that no reason or logic can change or alter. Nothing in the world can change it any more, and that conviction is called by the Sufis Iman.

The realization which is attained is that there is nothing to realize any more. The process of this attainment is a sincere research into truth and life, and the understanding of 'what I am the other is', together with the contemplation of God, a selfless consciousness, and a continual pursuit after the receiving of the knowledge of God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 17, 2017 02:33 pm
'There is a time when toys are treasures. But the child who cries for a toy comes to an age when he gives it away. And at every step in a man's evolution the values of power and position and wealth change in his eyes. And so as he evolves there arises in him a spirit of renunciation which may be called the Spirit of God. Gradually he recognizes the real value of those fair and lovely qualities of the spirit that change not.'

Hello friend

I have had this happen in my life. Yet there seems to be still objects in my life and situations that i find have value worthy of affection.....

I think thay i am just at the stage of admitting it and recognizing what may be holding me back spiritual progress. In this recognition comes the awareness of how we are hurt by worldly people and situations. We begin to understand how we set ourselves up for our own suffering.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 17, 2017 09:00 pm
Hi Steve,

It's true. People can be temporarily happy sharing together- temporary being the key word. Happy, angry, sad etc. A friend last night told me there is a difference between happiness and joy. Joy is what comes from cultivating the heart/spirit and isn't temporary.

I am rather fond of this statement,

In selfishness there is an illusion of profit, but in the end the profit attained by selfishness proves to be worthless. Life is the principal thing to consider, and true life is the inner life, the realization of God, the consciousness of one's spirit. When the human heart becomes conscious of God it turns into the sea and it spreads; it extends the waves of its love to friend and foe. Spreading further and further it attains perfection.

I have very perverse and selfish desires that may temporarily bring satisfaction but only after acting on them can I say they aren't helping me feel more wholesome and I don't see any comfort in the long run or peace from these actions when it's my time to go.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 18, 2017 02:48 am
Our greatest enemy is ourself. All weakness, all ignorance keeps us from the truth of our being, from all the virtues hidden in us and all perfection hidden in our souls. The first self we realize is the false self. Unless the soul is born again it will not see the kingdom of heaven. The soul is born into the false self; it is blind. In the true self the soul opens its eyes. Unless the false self is fought with, the true self cannot be realized.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_5.htm


The soul is a bird of paradise, a free dweller in the heavens. Its first prison is the mind, then the body. In these it becomes not only limited, but also captive. The whole endeavor of a Sufi in life is to liberate the soul from its captivity, which he does by conquering both mind and body.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_45.htm


If a man has control over himself, he will smile and be patient even if he is exposed to rages a thousand times. He will just wait. He who has spiritual control has great control; but he who has it not can control neither spiritual nor physical events. He cannot control his own sons and daughters, for he never listens to himself first. If he listened to himself, not only persons but even objects would listen to him.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_14.htm


There is a poem by the great Persian poet Iraqi in which he tells, 'When I went to the gate of the divine Beloved and knocked at the door, a voice came and said -- Who art thou?' When he had told, 'I am so and so', the answer came, 'There is no place for anyone else in this abode. Go back to whence thou hast come'. He turned back and then, after a long time, after having gone through the process of the cross and of crucifixion, he again went there -- with the spirit of selflessness. He knocked at the door; the word came, 'Who art thou? ', and he said, 'Thyself alone, for no one else exists save Thee'. And God said, 'Enter into this abode for now it belongs to thee'. It is such selflessness, to the extent that the thought of self is not there, it is being dead to the self, which is the recognition of God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_22.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 20, 2017 10:03 pm
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

It is to the great disadvantage of the fault-finding man that he wishes to find fault with all he sees, for if he is not able to throw away immediately the undesirable impression received, which is not always so easy, he begins in due time to reproduce what he has received. ... If man only knew what harm is brought to one's being by letting any undesirable impression enter the heart, he also would adopt the above-mentioned policy of the wise, to overlook.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_20.htm


The aim of the Sufi, therefore, is to see and yet not be interested. ... Those who trouble about others' thoughts and interest themselves in others' actions most often lose their time and blunt their inner sight. Those who go farther, their moral is to overlook all they see on their way, as their mind is fixed on the goal. ... The best thing is to see and rise above, never to halt on the way, and it is this attitude that, if constantly practiced, will lead man safely to his soul's desired goal.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 22, 2017 01:17 pm
I really make a conscious effort to think good of others and if i have a difficult time of it i pray for them. All people snd situations are passing phenomena to be seen much like an enjoyable movie. Sometimes though, i get caught on a certain clip and have to let go of it. Time and meditation heal all psychological wounds and help us once again flow with lifes' rhythms.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 22, 2017 08:01 pm
Hi Steve,

Very wise words. Thanks friend.

 :)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 23, 2017 04:04 pm
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Those who trouble about others' thoughts and interest themselves in others' actions most often lose their time and blunt their inner sight. Those who go farther, their moral is to overlook all they see on their way, as their mind is fixed on the goal. ... The best thing is to see and rise above, never to halt on the way, and it is this attitude that, if constantly practiced, will lead man safely to his soul's desired goal.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm

'lose their time and blunt their inner sight' insightful comments here.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 24, 2017 09:18 pm
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

A soul shows the proof of its evolution in the degree of the tolerance it shows. The life in the lower creation shows the lack of tolerance. The tendency of fighting with one another, which one sees among beasts and birds, shows the reason at the back of it, that intolerance is born in their nature. ... But when a soul has evolved still more, tolerance becomes the natural thing for him. Because the highly evolved soul then begins to realize 'Another person is not separate from me, but the other person is myself. The separation is on the surface of life, but in the depth of life I and the other person are one.' Therefore tolerance is not learned fully by trying to follow it as a good principle. It is learned by having the love of God, by attaining the knowledge of self, and by understanding the truth of life.



A Sufi tries to keep harmony in his surroundings, the harmony which demands many sacrifices. It makes one endure what one is not willing to endure, it makes one overlook what one is not inclined to overlook, it makes one tolerate what one is not accustomed to tolerate, and it makes one forgive and forget what one would never have forgotten if it were not for the sake of harmony. But at whatever cost harmony is attained, it is a good bargain. For harmony is the secret of happiness, and in absence of this a person living in palaces and rolling in gold can be most unhappy.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_17.htm



The first step to the attainment of the truth cannot be taught in books, or be imparted by a teacher. It must come spontaneously, namely through the love for truth. The next step is to search for it; the third step is the actual attainment. How can one attain? In order to attain truth one must make one's own life truthful. ... Passing from the state of natural man, through the state of being a lover of truth and a seeker after truth, one begins to express truth ... One begins to understand what the great teachers have taught. Then one becomes tolerant to the various religions. Nothing seems strange any more. Nothing surprises. For now one begins to know the innermost nature of man; one sees the cause behind every action. Therefore tolerance and forgiveness and understanding of others come naturally. The person who knows the truth is the most tolerant. It is the knower of truth who is forgiving; it is the knower of truth who understands another person's point of view. It is the knower of truth who does not readily voice his opinion, for he has respect for the opinions of others.

When man gains insight into himself, he also gains insight into the hearts of others. All this desire for learning occult or mystical powers or psychic powers now disappears, because he begins to see all this power in one truth -- loving truth, seeking truth, looking for truth, living the truthful life. That it is which opens all doors.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Philosophy V", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 30, 2017 07:40 pm
3/30/17

There is a beautiful story told of the King Akbar that when he was grieving with an almost ungovernable grief over the death of his mother, his ministers and friends tried to comfort him by influence and power. Akbar replied, "Yes, that is true, and that only makes my grief greater; for while I have everyone to bow before me, to give way to me, to salute me and obey me, my mother was the one person before whom I could humble myself; and I cannot tell you how great a joy that was to me."

Think, then, of the far greater joy of humbling one's self before the Father-Mother God on Whose Love one can always depend. A spark only of love expresses itself in the human father and mother; the Whole of Love in God. In whatever manner a man humbles himself it can never be enough to express the humility of the limited self before Limitless Perfection.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/archives/prayer.htm



   ~~~ We can never sufficiently humble our limited self before limitless perfection.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 14, 2017 07:15 pm
When one invokes the names of God, one forgets his limitations and impresses his soul with the thought of the Unlimited, which brings him to the ideal of limitlessness. This is the secret of life's attainment.

Man is the picture or reflection of his imagination. He is as large as he thinks himself, as great as he thinks himself, as small as he thinks himself to be. If he thinks he is incapable, he remains incapable; if he thinks himself foolish, he will be foolish and will remain foolish; if he thinks himself wise, he will be wise and become wiser every moment; if he thinks himself mighty, he will be mighty. Those who have proved themselves to be the greatest warriors, where did their might come from? It was from their thought, their feeling; 'I am mighty.' The idea of might was impressed on their soul, and the soul became might. The poet had poetry impressed on his soul, and so the soul became a poet. Whatever is impressed on man's soul, with that the soul becomes endowed, and that the soul will become.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_7.htm



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 22, 2017 02:16 am
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/04_21_17.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 06, 2017 03:49 pm
I read these are great to share on birthdays! Today is my Baby Sisters Birthday!  :) :) :)
So I shared this with her, in honor of her day of birth. It's a good one!

Unity in realization is far greater than unity in variety.

     Bowl of Saki, May 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Man's thought has a great power. And when he comes to the realization that everything comes from one source and that everything is developing towards one goal, he begins to see that the source and the goal are God. Then the world of variety is no longer variety to him but unity; it is one.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_29.htm

'When two hearts unite, they can break even mountains.' As two fuse in love, the more does intuition grow, the more does one understand whether the other is happy, or pleased, or displeased, whatever distance may separate them. This is nothing but just the unity of the one person with the other. It is clairvoyance. The mother knows the condition of her son at the battlefront. She can see him in her dreams. Hearts, which are united in love, perceive the state of mind of the loved ones. They do not have to study mysticism or concentration, for they have natural concentration. The mother does not pretend to meditate; love teaches her more meditation than a person who pretends to study it can attain.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_18.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 15, 2017 01:04 am
The wisdom and justice of God are within us, and yet they are far away, hidden by the veil of the limited self.

     Bowl of Saki, May 14, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 24, 2017 10:15 pm
   
Discussion is for those who say, "What I say is right, and what you say is wrong." A sage never says such a thing hence, there is no discussion.


     Bowl of Saki, May 24, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik71.jpg)

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


Once I was with a sage whom many people went to see. He pleased them all, and he was not fond of disputing or discussing, because to a sage there is nothing to discuss. Discussion is for those who say, 'What I say is right, and what you say is wrong.' A sage never says such a thing; hence there is no discussion. But the world is always fighting and discussing and disputing.

Many would come and try to dispute with him, but he did his best to avoid dispute. I was very fond of listening to his way of dealing with inquirers. My friends wanted to discuss what the ideal life is. He said, 'Whatever you think it is.' But my friends were not satisfied with this. They wanted a discussion. They answered, 'Do you think this worldly life, with so many responsibilities, with strife from morning to evening, can be the ideal life?' He said, 'Yes.' They asked, 'Do you not think that the life you lead, retirement and seclusion, is the ideal life?' He answered, 'Yes.' They said, 'But how can we give up our present life, our responsibilities to our children, our occupations, and all these things that take up so much time. How can we leave that life in order to follow your ideal life?' He said, 'Do not leave it.'

They went on, 'But, if we do not leave it, how can we get on in the spiritual life?' Then the sage asked, 'What do you mean by the spiritual life?' 'We mean by spiritual life a life like yours,' they answered. He said, 'If you think my life is a spiritual life, be like me. If you think your life is a spiritual life, keep to it. It is not possible to say which life is best. If you think your worldly strife brings you happiness, just keep to it. If you think my life gives you happiness, give up your own. Whatever makes you happy and makes you think you are doing right, do it from that moment, and see what the result is. If it gives you more happiness, go on regardless of what others say. If it gives you happiness, if you are satisfied while doing it, while reaping its effect, then it is all right. Go on with it, and you will always be blessed.'

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_29.htm


People discuss dogmas, beliefs, and moral principles, as they know them. But there comes a time in a man's life when he has touched truth of which he cannot speak in words; and at that time all dispute, discussion, argument ends.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_34.htm


https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 25, 2017 12:25 pm
Discussion is for those who say, "What I say is right, and what you say is wrong." A sage never says such a thing hence, there is no discussion.

People discuss dogmas, beliefs, and moral principles, as they know them. But there comes a time in a man's life when he has touched truth of which he cannot speak in words; and at that time all dispute, discussion, argument ends.


What great thoughts and attitudes! Just reach this experience for short time periods then find myself part of the world again; it's challenging differences of opinion.

I wonder; is it not possible to discuss without saying or expressing 'what I say is rite and what you say is wrong?'
It is possible to learn from one another. Is it not?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 30, 2017 07:22 pm
The control of self means the control of everything.

     Bowl of Saki, May 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Self-control is the most necessary thing to be learned; a person may have great spirituality, illumination and piety, but in the absence of self-control this is nothing. Self-control also is the way of happiness and peace. ... No thought or feeling should arise without our will. When we have gained mastery over the self, we have mastery over all things. ... Self-control is an attribute which distinguishes man from the animal; both have their appetites and passions, but it is man alone who can control them.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_14.htm


The control of the self means the control of everything. What does it mean when we see a person fail time after time, or another person succeed time after time? It is just a matter of holding the reins of our affairs in our hands. When there is no rein there is failure. Failure means that there has been lack of self-control, whether it is a failure in affairs or in health. Illness always comes when a person has lost the control of the self. It is because this is the main theme of metaphysics that Hatha Yoga has been considered of the greatest value. All the miracles and all the wonders that have ever been known in this world have been done by those who have been able to control themselves by abstinence, and therefore to control life. However much was said upon this subject, it would still not express it. To begin with a person is puzzled by it, and he wonders whether he should believe it or not. That is why in the East the adepts never speak of their experiences in the spiritual life. They only tell their disciples to lead it and practice for years. 'That will make it clear to you', they say.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_30.htm



   ~~~ The control of self means the control of everything.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 06, 2017 09:38 pm
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Externally we are a single being, but internally we are a world. As vast as is the world around us, so vast is the world within. Asif says, 'The limitation of the sky and land cannot be compared with man's heart. If man's heart be wide, there is nothing wider than this.' All can be accommodated in it; heaven earth, sun, moon, all are reflected in it. It becomes itself the whole. This world becomes as one chooses to make it. If man only knew that! But since he does not know that, the world is not heaven, but has become its opposite. We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world; that our world has an influence upon our life within as well as upon our life without.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_17.htm
Bowl of Saki, June 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan




Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 08, 2017 06:55 am
Nobody appears inferior to us when our heart is kindled with kindness and our eyes are open to the vision of God.

     Bowl of Saki, June 7, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 29, 2017 06:36 am
The awakened heart says, "I must give, I must not demand." Thus it enters a gate that leads to a constant happiness.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik94.jpg)
     Bowl of Saki, June 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

An unhappy person, being himself unhappy, cannot make others happy. It is a wealthy person who can help the one who is hard up, not a poor person, however much desire of helping he may have. So it is with happiness, which is a great wealth; and a happy person can take away the unhappiness of another, for he has enough for himself and for others.

Earthly pleasures are the shadows of happiness; because of their transitory character. True happiness is in love, which is the stream that springs from one's soul. He who will allow this stream to run continually in all conditions of life, in all situations, however difficult, will have a happiness which truly belongs to him, the source of which is not without, but within. If there is a constant outpouring of love one becomes a divine fountain, for from the depth of the fountain rises the stream and, on its return, it pours upon the fountain, bathing it continually.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_17.htm

Why does a mystic attribute such great importance to harmony? Because to a mystic, his whole life is one continuous symphony, a playing of music, with each soul contributing his particular part to the symphony. A person's success therefore depends upon the idea he has of harmony. Very few people in the world pay attention to harmony. They do not know that without it, there is no chance of happiness. It is only the harmonious ones who can make others happy and partake of that happiness themselves; and apart from them, it is hard to find happiness in the world.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_8.htm


The method of attainment is to endeavor always to make others happy and by experiencing happiness in the happiness of others. In the terms of the Sufi, it is Suluk. Any selfishness prevents us from appreciating another's happiness and therefore we shall be kept back, for the happiness of others is the gate to our own happiness. Real happiness is entering the gate. We must feel satisfaction in another's satisfaction ... If a person needs a certain thing and we can supply it, we should be happy, how ever small the thing may be.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/archives/constancy.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 27, 2017 07:50 pm
   Belief and disbelief have divided mankind into so many sects, blinding its eyes to the vision of the oneness of all life.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik82.jpg)
     Bowl of Saki, July 27, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

For the Sufi there exists no one in this world, neither heathen nor pagan, who is to be despised, for he believes in that God who is not the God of one chosen sect but the God of the whole world.


https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 19, 2017 06:53 pm
Overlook the greatest fault of another, but do not partake of it yourself in the smallest degree.

     Bowl of Saki, August 19, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

The more the self learns, the more it overlooks the evil in others. It does not mean that the evil is not in others; it only means that one finds in oneself the enemy which one was seeing outwardly. And the worst enemy one was faced with in outer life one finds to be in one's own heart. It makes one feel humiliated, but it teaches the true lesson: one finds oneself having the same element which one wishes to resist in another.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_19.htm

For the wise, who have risen above the ordinary faults of human life, it matters little if they find fault, but they are the ones who do not criticize. They, as a rule, overlook all that seems undesirable, and that action of overlooking itself prevents all the undesirable impressions from penetrating through their hearts. There is a natural tendency in man as in the animal to protect his heart from all hurt or harm, but that is the external heart. If man only knew what harm is brought to one's being by letting any undesirable impression enter the heart, he also would adopt the above-mentioned policy of the wise, to overlook.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_20.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 26, 2017 07:47 am
 

Faith is the A B C of the realization of God. This faith begins by prayer.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Someone once said to a Brahmin, 'O ignorant man, you have worshipped this idol for years. Do you think it can ever answer you?' 'Yes,' said the Brahmin, 'even from this idol of stone the answer will come if your faith is real. But if you have no real faith, you will get no answer even from the God in heaven.' ... The first necessity is the belief that there is such a Being as God, in whom goodness, beauty, and greatness are perfect. In the beginning it will seem nothing but a belief; but in time, if kept in sincerity and faith, that belief will become like the egg of the Phoenix, out of which the magic bird is born. The birth of God is the birth of the soul. Every soul seeks for happiness, and after pursuing all the objects which for the moment seem to give happiness, it finds out that nowhere is there perfect happiness except in God.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 29, 2017 08:48 am
Death is a tax the soul has to pay for having had a name and a form.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

All that is constructed is subject to destruction; all that is composed must be decomposed; all that is formed must be destroyed; that which has birth has death. But all this belongs to matter; the spirit which is absorbed by this formation of matter or by its mechanism lives, for spirit cannot die.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_I_12.htm


That which the soul has borrowed he must give back when it has done its work; it was borrowed for a certain time and for a certain purpose. When the purpose is fulfilled, when the time is finished, then every plane asks for that which the soul has borrowed from it, and one cannot help but give it back to that plane. It is this process which is called assimilation. Since man is born greedy and selfish he has taken all things willingly, enthusiastically -- he gives them back grudgingly and calls it death. ...

Death is nothing but the taking off of one garb and giving it back to the plane from which it was borrowed, for the condition is this: one cannot take the garb of the lower plane to the higher plane. The soul is only released when it is willing -- or compelled -- to give its garb to the plane it has taken it from. It is this which releases the soul to go on in its travel. And as it proceeds to a higher plane, after its stay there it must again give its garb back and be purified from it in order to go further. ... This knowledge also throws a light upon the question of death. Death is not really death; it is only a passing stage, it is only a change, as changing clothes.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_3.htm



   ~~~ Death is a tax the soul has to pay for having had a name and a form.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 07, 2017 07:55 am
I've been selling my pearls for a price

Happy is he who does good to others; miserable is he who expects good from others.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Man's greatest enemy is his ego which manifests itself in selfishness. Even in his doing good, in his kind actions, selfishness is sometimes at work. When he does good with the thought that one day it may return to him and that he may share in the good, he sells his pearls for a price. A kind action, a thought of sympathy, of generosity, is too precious to trade with. One should give and, while giving, close the eyes. Man should remember to do every little action, every little kindness, every act of generosity with his whole heart, without the desire of getting anything in return making a trade out of it. The satisfaction must be in doing it and in nothing else.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm


It is said that if someone asks you to go with him one mile, you should go with him two miles. That means, if someone makes use of our services, let us not think, 'Why should I, such an important person, serve another, give my time to another?' Let us give our services more liberally than we are asked to do. Let us give service, give our time; but when the time for receiving comes, do not let us expect to receive anything. Let us not expect our friend to be as we are to him; that will never be possible. We must then practice renunciation. We must practice virtue because we like it; do good because we like to do it and not for any return; expect no kindness or appreciation; if we do, it will become a trade. This is the right way for the world in general, and the only way of becoming happy.

****

The principal teaching of Sufism is that the heart of man is the shrine of God, to recognize God in one's own heart, to feel His existence, presence, virtue, goodness, all manner of beauty. It must be remembered that the whole life around us is a life of falsehood. The more you see and experience the more you see how very false it is, how much disillusionment there is. The only way of getting over it is to light the lamp in the darkness of night, and all will be cleared. The secret of life is this: to produce beauty in ourselves. When beauty is produced in the heart, then all that breaks the heart vanishes and the whole universe becomes one single vision of the sublimity of God.

****



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 04, 2017 12:49 am
Hazrat Inayat Khan speaks on renunciation...

(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik18.jpg)
    
Renunciation is always for a purpose; it is to kindle the soul that nothing may hold it back from God, but when it is kindled, the life of renunciation is not necessary.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Renunciation has an automatic action on the heart of man, an action which very few realize because very few arrive at that stage where they can renounce. By this action a spiritual spark is kindled in the soul; and when a person has arrived at that stage he has taken the first step on the path of spirituality. The spark produced by this action in the depths of the heart culminates in a flame, a torch in life; and this changes the whole outlook on life. The whole world seems changed, the same world in which one has lived and suffered and enjoyed and learned and unlearned -- everything appears to change once renunciation is learned. ... He alone is capable of renunciation who finds a greater satisfaction in seeing another eat his piece of bread than in eating it himself.

Only he whose heart is full of happiness after an act of renunciation should make a renunciation. This shows that renunciation is not something that can be learned or taught. It comes by itself as the soul develops, when the soul begins to see the true value of things. All that is valuable to others a seer begins to see differently. Thus the value of all the things that we consider precious or not precious, is according to the way we look at them. For one person the renunciation of a penny is too much; for another that of everything he possesses is nothing. It depends on how we look at things. One rises above all that one renounces in life. Man remains the slave of anything which he has not renounced; of that which he has renounced he becomes king. This whole world can become a kingdom to a person who has renounced it. Renunciation depends upon the evolution of the soul. One who has not evolved spiritually cannot really renounce. Toys so precious to children mean nothing to the grown-up; it is easy to renounce them; and so it is for those who develop spiritually; for them all things are easy to renounce.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIIIa/VIIIa_1_13.htm


Be obstinate in the path of success. Nothing should keep you back from your effort when your resolution is once taken. Renounce your object of attainment only when you have reached it and you have a better one in view. But when you have attained the object and you cling to it, then you hinder your own progress, for the object is greater than yourself. You are greater than the object when you are able to renounce it after attaining it.

   ~~~ "Githa I, 3 - The Path of Attainment", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


Some lead the life of renunciation, others have family, friends and all things, because renunciation is always for a purpose. It is to kindle the soul, that there may be nothing to hold the soul back from God, but when the soul is kindled the life of renunciation is not a necessity.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Life of the Sage in the East(1)", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


It is as  Fariduddin Attar, the great Persian poet, says, 'Renounce the good of the world, renounce the good of heaven, renounce your highest ideal, and then renounce your renunciation.'

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_9.htm




   ~~~ Renunciation is always for a purpose; it is to kindle the soul that nothing may hold it back from God, but when it is kindled, the life of renunciation is not necessary.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 12, 2017 07:23 pm
(http://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik95.jpg)
When the mind and body are restless, nothing in life can be accomplished. Success is the result of control.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

When a person allows himself to be disturbed, that shows that his concentration is not good. And if his concentration is not good, that shows that his will power fails him. The best way, therefore, to protect oneself from disturbance is to develop the power of concentration, so that the will power develops naturally and one is able to withstand all the disturbances which arise when one has to live in the midst of the crowd.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_29.htm


Independence is achieved by indifference. It does not mean that one should take no heed of what anyone does or says; it only means one should discriminate between important and unimportant things of everyday life; that every necessary and unnecessary thing should not demand so much of one's attention, thought, and feeling. Political economy has become a subject of education, but spiritual economy is the main thing in religion. All one says and does and all that one thinks and feels puts a certain strain upon one's spirit. It is wise to avoid every risk of losing one's equilibrium. One must stand peacefully but firmly before all influences that disturb one's life. The natural inclination is to answer in defense to every offense that comes from outside, but in that way one loses one's equilibrium. Self-control, therefore, is the key to all success and happiness.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_1.htm


Another sign of progress is that, at times, one begins to feel peaceful. This may increase so much that a restful feeling comes in the heart. One might be in the solitude, but even if one is in a crowd, one still feels restful. Life in the world is most exciting; it has a tiring effect upon a sensitive person. When one is restless, the conditions in life can make one experience the greatest discomfort, for there is no greater pain than restlessness. If there is any remedy for the lack of peace, it is spiritual progress. Once peace is developed in a soul, that soul feels such a great power and has such a great influence upon those who approach it and upon all upsetting conditions and jarring influences coming from all sides. Just as water makes the dust settle down, so all jarring influences settle down under the feet of the peaceful.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_2_9.htm




Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 21, 2017 05:50 am

Bowl of Saki for November 20
    
It is the soul's light which is natural intelligence.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Coming to the cause of the lack of joy, one realizes by pondering on the subject that it is not pursuing after joy that results in disappointment, it is the wrong method adopted in the pursuit of joy which brings, instead of joy, sorrow or disappointment. ... Nothing can take away joy from the man who has right understanding. Through all conditions of life he will retain it, but the one who lacks understanding, nothing in the world or Heaven there is which can bring him a lasting joy. This shows that, in reality, joy does not come from the external life, though always it seems so. Joy has only one source and that is the heart of man, which is the globe over his soul's light.

   ~~~ "Sangatha III, Tasawwuf ", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 07, 2017 05:51 am
Things in the world are changeable; they are not to be relied upon. Man sees the vanity of the world; but if he does not see a reality in contrast, he remains intoxicated by the unreality, and tries to get some pleasure from his life, even for a moment. The happiness of this world is something we cannot keep; it is just like the horizon -- the nearer you go, the farther it goes. As soon as you get it, you see it is not the thing you wanted. That discontent continues its work till we have found and understood the manifestation of God, in which is hidden the Divine Spirit. God cannot be found in temples, for God is Love; and love does not live in temples, but in the heart of man, which is the temple of God.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Brotherhood I", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)



   ~~~ To deny the changeableness of life is like fancying a motionless sea, which can only exist in one's imagination.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: SI on Dec 07, 2017 06:39 am
Things in the world are changeable; they are not to be relied upon. Man sees the vanity of the world; but if he does not see a reality in contrast, he remains intoxicated by the unreality, and tries to get some pleasure from his life, even for a moment. The happiness of this world is something we cannot keep; it is just like the horizon -- the nearer you go, the farther it goes. As soon as you get it, you see it is not the thing you wanted. That discontent continues its work till we have found and understood the manifestation of God, in which is hidden the Divine Spirit. God cannot be found in temples, for God is Love; and love does not live in temples, but in the heart of man, which is the temple of God.

I don't see how you fear death when you post something like this.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 07, 2017 06:56 am
Hi SI
Yes and I have had dreams of an after life and even a few out of body experiences. But those have given me a fright at one point.. Though I fear death I find wisdom in these bits shared and they seem to help me reflect and how I go about my day.

I learned about Sufi in a dream and hav been drawn to Inayat Khans expressive and philosophical nature.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: SI on Dec 07, 2017 07:00 am
Hi SI
Yes and I have had dreams of an after life and even a few out of body experiences. But those have given me a fright at one point.. Though I fear death I find wisdom in these bits shared and they seem to help me reflect and how I go about my day.

I dunno, maybe that's what needs to happen for you to understand.

If those things happened to me I think I would be mostly like "I know I get it", so either I move on right then or what's the point?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Dec 07, 2017 05:09 pm
Hi SI
Yes and I have had dreams of an after life and even a few out of body experiences. But those have given me a fright at one point.. Though I fear death I find wisdom in these bits shared and they seem to help me reflect and how I go about my day.

I learned about Sufi in a dream and hav been drawn to Inayat Khans expressive and philosophical nature.

You have much good karma to have such experiences. They have helped u much and the initial fright may just be getting used to such occurrences and relating them to this life's experiences. This life can also be a frightening experience until we get used to many of these lives and call on our spiritual guides to navigate us beyond the storms of maya. Such experiences can be inspirational to search more and for understanding our soul nature. I enjoy your sharing your experiences.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: SI on Dec 07, 2017 06:52 pm
You have much good karma to have such experiences. They have helped u much and the initial fright may just be getting used to such occurrences and relating them to this life's experiences. This life can also be a frightening experience until we get used to many of these lives and call on our spiritual guides to navigate us beyond the storms of maya. Such experiences can be inspirational to search more and for understanding our soul nature. I enjoy your sharing your experiences.

Fear is funny as it comes on many forms, causes so much misunderstanding, very distracting.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 16, 2018 09:36 pm
    
To learn to adopt the standard of God, and to cease to wish to make the world conform to one's own standard of good, is the chief lesson of religion.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 23, 2018 05:41 am
Inayat Khan has inspired me to stay the course tonight...
ďFailure comes when will surrenders to reason.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat KhanĒ
He elaborated in his commentary and makes me wonder what miracles occur as a result of increased will power- could they be beyond our imagination...?
ď
Will is not [merely] 'a power', but it is all the power there is. How did God create the world? By will. Therefore, what we call 'will power' in us is in reality 'God power,' a power that increases by our recognizing its potentiality and proves to be the greatest phenomenon in life. If there is any secret behind the mystery of the world of phenomena that can be learned, it is will power. It is by will power that all we do, physically or mentally, is accomplished. Our hands, with all their perfect mechanisms, cannot hold a glass of water if there is no will power to support them. If will power fails, a person seemingly healthy will not be able to stand.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/II/II_38.htmď


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 09, 2018 06:10 am
Love manifests towards those whom we like as love; towards those whom we do not like as forgiveness.

    Bowl of Saki, February 8, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 11, 2018 06:00 pm
He who arrives at the state of indifference without experiencing interest in life is incomplete and apt to be tempted by interest at any moment; but he who arrives at the state of indifference by going through interest really attains the blessed state.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 02, 2018 07:14 am
Inayat Khan often speaks about Nature as a teacher... And todays Saki he says it is one of the greatest teachers...

Nature speaks louder than the call from the minaret.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

When a person travels in a tramcar, in the train, with a newspaper in his hand, he wants to read the sensational news which is worth nothing. He should read human nature which is before him, people coming and going. If he would continue to do this, he would begin to read human beings as though they were letters written by the divine pen, which speak of their past and future. He should look deeply at the heavens and at nature and at all the things to be seen in everyday life, and reflect upon them with the desire to understand. This kind of study is much superior, incomparably superior, to the study of books.

   https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_15.htm

Just as there is a communication between persons who love each other very much, so the sympathy of a person whose soul has unfolded itself is so awakened that not only every person but even every object begins to reveal its nature, its character and secret. To him every man is a written letter.

We hear stories of saints and sages who talked with rocks and plants and trees. They are not only stories; it is reality. It is also told of the apostles that at the moment when the Spirit descended upon them they began to speak many languages. When they understood so many languages, they understood the language of every soul. It means that the illuminated soul understands the language of every soul. And every soul has its own language. It is that which is called revelation.
https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_2_19.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 11, 2018 09:57 am
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Everyone says or does or thinks only according to his own particular evolution, and he cannot do better. Why not, therefore tolerate? Why not, therefore, forgive?

   ~~~ "Religious Gatheka, Religion of the Heart III (#44)", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

The first sign of realization is tolerance towards others. There are the words of Christ: 'In the house of my father are many mansions' and those of the Prophet: 'Each soul has its own religion' This means that according to his evolution so man knows the truth and the more a man knows, the more he finds there is to learn.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


Every man's pursuit is according to his evolution.

     Bowl of Saki, March 10, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 21, 2018 06:01 am
It is wise to see all things, and yet to turn our eyes from all that should be overlooked.

     Bowl of Saki, March 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

It is to the great disadvantage of the fault-finding man that he wishes to find fault with all he sees, for if he is not able to throw away immediately the undesirable impression received, which is not always so easy, he begins in due time to reproduce what he has received. ... If man only knew what harm is brought to one's being by letting any undesirable impression enter the heart, he also would adopt the above-mentioned policy of the wise, to overlook.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_20.htm


The aim of the Sufi, therefore, is to see and yet not be interested. ... Those who trouble about others' thoughts and interest themselves in others' actions most often lose their time and blunt their inner sight. Those who go farther, their moral is to overlook all they see on their way, as their mind is fixed on the goal. ... The best thing is to see and rise above, never to halt on the way, and it is this attitude that, if constantly practiced, will lead man safely to his soul's desired goal.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm


There is a tendency which manifests itself and grows in a person who is advancing spiritually, and that tendency is overlooking. At times this tendency might appear as negligence, but in reality negligence is not necessarily overlooking. Negligence is most often not looking. Overlooking may be called in other words rising beyond these things: one has to rise in order to overlook; the one who stands beneath life could not overlook, even if he wanted to. Overlooking is a manner of graciousness; it is looking and at the same time not looking. It is seeing and not taking notice of what is seen. It is being hurt or harmed or disturbed by something and yet not minding it. It is an attribute of nobleness of nature. It is the sign of souls who are tuned to a higher key.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_11.htm


Whenever we see that goodness is lacking, we may add to it from our own heart and so complete the nobility of human nature. This is done by patience, tolerance, kindness, forgiveness. The lover of goodness loves every little sign of goodness. He overlooks the faults and fills up the gaps by pouring out love and supplying that which is lacking. This is real nobility of soul.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_9.htm



   ~~~ It is wise to see all things, and yet to turn our eyes from all that should be overlooked.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik42.jpg)

A wise man once told me that you do not find fault in your Beloved. The moment you count her flaws she is no longer your Beloved. I think I am beginning to understand what he means.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 25, 2018 04:55 am
Wow u are so true!!!!

A wise man once told me that you do not find fault in your Beloved. The moment you count her flaws she is no longer your Beloved. I think I am beginning to understand what he means.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 17, 2018 06:19 am
"God is love" - three words which open up an unending realm for the thinker who desires to probe the depths of the secret of life.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Every kind of power lies in this one thing which we call by the simple name: love. Charity, generosity, kindness, affection, endurance, tolerance, and patience -- all these words are different aspects of one; they are different names of only one thing: love. Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own. Love as kindness is one thing, love as tolerance is another, love as generosity is another, love as patience another; and yet from beginning to end it is just love.

   https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm



Love, whether it is human or divine is considered to be sacred, in the view of the mystics, philosophers, and thinkers. That it is possible to regard it thus is shown by the fact that in its root it is beyond both the human and the divine. As it is written in the Bible, 'God is Love', three words which open up an unending realm for the thinker who desires to probe the depth of the secret of love. In ordinary life, we make this word mean affection for our surroundings, for our relatives or our beloved, but when we think deeply about it, we see that from start to finish it represents the power underlying the power of all activities and all intelligences.

   https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 25, 2018 07:12 am
Wow I don't think I've read this one or if I have it has been a while... Spot ON with my thoughts and feelings...
Goodness! ^_^

The aim of the mystic is to keep near to the idea of unity, and to find out where we unite.

     Bowl of Saki, April 24, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Whatever a man desires, that desire informs us of the state of mind he is in, and those who understand the mind well, know the mind of another simply by studying the desires and tendencies of his life. Love of a rose, a lily, a jasmine, of sweet, sour, salt, or savory things, expresses the particular tendency of a person's mind, the mood he is in. Modern education omits the study of the truth which teaches us that unity comes from nature's variety, whereas the sole aim of the mystic is to keep near to the idea of unity and to find out where we unite.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 29, 2018 05:54 pm
On Silence...

In everyday life we are confronted with a thousand troubles that we are not always evolved enough to meet, and then only silence can help us. For if there is any religion, if there is any practice of religion, it is to have regard for the pleasure of God by regarding the pleasure of man. The essence of religion is to understand. And this religion we cannot live without having power over the word, without having realized the power of silence. There are so very many occasions when we repent after hurting friends, which could have been avoided if there had been control over our words. Silence is the shield of the ignorant and the protection of the wise. For the ignorant does not prove his ignorance if he keeps silent, and the wise man does not throw pearls before swine if he knows the worth of silence.

What gives power over words? What gives the power that can be attained by silence? The answer is: it is will-power which gives the control over words; it is silence which gives one the power of silence. It is restlessness when a person speaks too much. The more words are used to express an idea, the less powerful they become. It is a great pity that man so often thinks of saving pennies and never thinks of sparing words. It is like saving pebbles and throwing away pearls. An Indian poet says, 'Pearl-shell, what gives you your precious contents? Silence; for years my lips were closed.'

For a moment it is a struggle with oneself; it is controlling an impulse; but afterwards the same thing becomes a power.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IV/IV_34.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Apr 30, 2018 05:18 am
You've already found out what it means to speak or keep silent at the right time and in the right place to keep silent is perfectly Divine and brings blessings on all concerned if we do so where and when we should but on the other hand if we keep silent in a place or at a time when we should speak up as for example when we might save a person from a great danger with just a word our keeping silence becomes satanic.

These words are important because we as spiritual beings should not allow the wickedness and evil acts of a mob run our country.


Title: An Important Lesson
Post by: tides2dust on May 03, 2018 03:36 am
I am posting yesterday's saki. I found this to be one of the most important lessons for me right now. I am blown away by how aligned I am with the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan and how I came to discover Sufism in the first place. It is curious to me how I do not give more importance to the synchronistic experience's that strengthen faith in an unseen intelligent force. Here's to raising awareness. And on to the lesson....

There are plenty of tidbits/talking points in this one saki alone so I will focus on the thing that immediately stood out to me. But first

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik11.jpg)

You can have all good things - wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to receive - once you have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, and from repugnance at the idea that things are not as you want them to be.

     Bowl of Saki, May 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Do not expect much from friends. Why must they be as you want them to be? They are not made by you. They are as they are. You must try to be for them what they expect you to be. It matters little if your friend proves to you to be a friend. What matters is, if you prove to be a friend.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_III_1.htm


However evolved we may be with our education and experience, yet what are we really seeking? Things from which we cannot derive any lasting gain. From these false things we gain the experience that the things to which we have hitherto attached importance and which we have valued are things that do not last. We learn at length that it would be wise to remember that all these objects and ideals and aspirations which we have in life should be judged according to whether they are dependable or not, lasting or not.

After we have perceived the truth that this or that is not to be depended upon, we find that it is not necessary to renounce them all, to give up everything in life. We can be in the crowd just as well as in seclusion in the wilderness. We can have all good things, wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to take once we have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, learned to escape from repugnance at the idea that the things are not as we would want them to be. A man can still attend to business, he may attain wealth, he can carry out all those things, but now his eyes are wide open; before, they were blind. This is the teaching of life. ...

It is not the actual literal renunciation which counts, it is the personal abandonment of belief in the importance of transient things. ... If there is such a thing as saintly renunciation, it is renouncing small gains for better gains; not for no gains, but seeing with open eyes what is better and what is inferior. Even if the choice has to lie between two momentary gains, one of these would always be found to be more real and lasting; that is the one that should be followed for the time. When we take the torch of wisdom to show us our path through life, we will end by realizing what is really profitable in life and what is not.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_15.htm



   ~~~ You can have all good things -- wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to receive -- once you have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, and from repugnance at the idea that things are not as you want them to be.

---------

Wow! At first I was hesitant when Inayat Khan says how we must try to be there for our friends even if they are not there for us. Then I realized he is describing a personal gain on a spiritual sense and could not agree more with this statement. If I believe in Love and wish to grow in this area, then Loving those who aren't always there for us makes sense. They don't need to know our belief's and recognizing that service to our friends even those who may dismiss us is service to God. No, I am not always there for friends- my ego is still so large and fragile. But I am understanding the WEALTH in this advice, the internal pursuits and kinship between God and I alone(you and God)- something that can not be described in words. The second most important lesson I am finding is, there is no need to renounce something if you can find a greater understanding in it and if you are not controlled by it....
This speaks to me. I have struggled with alcohol for a while. I have tried renouncing it but find I still enjoy a beverage from time to time. My understanding to this issue has been an internal battle between a comfort and fulfillment. I love how the goal is to be a part of the world yet for the most part unhindered by its influence. One does not need to be a hermit to achieve a great spiritual liberation. Lately I find I am not as dependent on alcohol as I once was- I find value in being able to maintain a level of self awareness while in the crowd even when offered a drink by a friend. In fact, self awareness is the mantra as of late for most every moment. No longer looking to get ďfucked upĒ but find I'm not having to isolate myself from any social gatherings either. I am sure we all have our own way to deal with this kind of stuff but it is a great reassurance and so much to learn from his words. While I am happy to be making strides, I have seen the grip of alcoholism on this family and am still extremely cautious. With anything, the moment I think I've gotten something down I am reminded the opposite- that I still struggle with an addictive or overly excited energy...

On top of trying to discover why we do the things we do, meditation has helped slow my thoughts down and be less judgemental. I am easily agitated but am trying... Never give up, always maintain a fighting spirit and pray for awareness right? It's funny how personable yet aloof it seems we must be when living a spiritual life. Hmm

Cheers.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 06, 2018 10:04 am
You can have all good things - wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to receive - once you have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, and from repugnance at the idea that things are not as you want them to be. ~
     Bowl of Saki, May 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

I think that some us become acquainted with the fact that unlike much of the rest of the population who learn by bitter experiences alone....there emerges patterns in our lives. Those patterns are often orchestrated by forces higher then ourselves. This is when we learn that we have gurus helping us in this school house called life....and guiding us towards enlightenment.

Quote from Eric;

I am posting yesterday's saki. I found this to be one of the most important lessons for me right now. I am blown away by how aligned I am with the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan and how I came to discover Sufism in the first place. It is curious to me how I do not give more importance to the synchronistic experience's that strengthen faith in an unseen intelligent force. Here's to raising awareness. And on to the lesson....

"GOD TALKS WITH ARJUNA" THE BHAGAVAD GITA ~ ॐ ~  (Day 66.) Sat.  5th May, 2018 . Chapter  3, Verse:- 28-31 ~ Pages: 392-398. ~ॐ ~
"KARMA YOGA:~ 'THE PATH OF SPIRITUAL ACTION." ~ ॐ ~
       THE YOGI NOT ONLY RELINQUISHES EGOTISM during the all-surrendering union (Yoga) of mind BLISS - in MEDITATION, but during ORDINARY wakeful ACTIVITY AS WELL.  In the highest state of ECSTASY - the Yogi can REMAIN united TO SPIRIT  even while working with mind and body - to carry out the DIVINE PLAN.  By engaging with DIVINE CONSCIOUSNESS in ALL of his ACTIVITIES, the DEVOTEE is FREE of EGOTISTIC LIMITATIONS during wakefulness, as in the ordinary Man during sleep. (Read on page 398.)
 ........ Paramahansa Yogananda .........



Title: Re: An Important Lesson
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 13, 2018 11:58 am

Eric Thank-You i am so grateful that you continue to bring this unique wisdom to us from
Hazrat Inayat Khan. It was not without his blessings that you are an instrument of his presence with us. This has made the forum very attractive and helpful spiritually speaking. I always come back to his wisdom and spiritual teachings and feel that i am connected to these teachings and sufism myself. Perhaps that is even how we were once together in the past my brother...i truly love u and am grateful for your presence and bringing this great spiritual guru to our site Eric.

Steve Hydonus/Jitendra

I am posting yesterday's saki. I found this to be one of the most important lessons for me right now. I am blown away by how aligned I am with the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan  :)and how I came to discover Sufism in the first place. It is curious to me how I do not give more importance to the synchronistic experience's that strengthen faith in an unseen intelligent force. Here's to raising awareness. And on to the lesson....

There are plenty of tidbits/talking points in this one saki alone so I will focus on the thing that immediately stood out to me. But first

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik11.jpg)

You can have all good things - wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to receive - once you have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, and from repugnance at the idea that things are not as you want them to be.

     Bowl of Saki, May 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Do not expect much from friends. Why must they be as you want them to be? They are not made by you. They are as they are. You must try to be for them what they expect you to be. It matters little if your friend proves to you to be a friend. What matters is, if you prove to be a friend.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_III_1.htm


However evolved we may be with our education and experience, yet what are we really seeking? Things from which we cannot derive any lasting gain. From these false things we gain the experience that the things to which we have hitherto attached importance and which we have valued are things that do not last. We learn at length that it would be wise to remember that all these objects and ideals and aspirations which we have in life should be judged according to whether they are dependable or not, lasting or not.

After we have perceived the truth that this or that is not to be depended upon, we find that it is not necessary to renounce them all, to give up everything in life. We can be in the crowd just as well as in seclusion in the wilderness. We can have all good things, wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to take once we have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, learned to escape from repugnance at the idea that the things are not as we would want them to be. A man can still attend to business, he may attain wealth, he can carry out all those things, but now his eyes are wide open; before, they were blind. This is the teaching of life. ...

It is not the actual literal renunciation which counts, it is the personal abandonment of belief in the importance of transient things. ... If there is such a thing as saintly renunciation, it is renouncing small gains for better gains; not for no gains, but seeing with open eyes what is better and what is inferior. Even if the choice has to lie between two momentary gains, one of these would always be found to be more real and lasting; that is the one that should be followed for the time. When we take the torch of wisdom to show us our path through life, we will end by realizing what is really profitable in life and what is not.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_15.htm



   ~~~ You can have all good things -- wealth, friends, kindness, love to give and love to receive -- once you have learned not to be blinded by them, learned to escape from disappointment, and from repugnance at the idea that things are not as you want them to be.

---------

Wow! At first I was hesitant when Inayat Khan says how we must try to be there for our friends even if they are not there for us.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 20, 2018 04:07 am
   (https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik11.jpg)
He is wise who treats an acquaintance as a friend, and he is foolish who treats a friend as an acquaintance, and he is impossible who treats friends and acquaintances as strangers; you cannot help him.

     Bowl of Saki, May 19, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Friendship as the average person understands it is perhaps little more than acquaintance; but in reality it is more sacred than any other connection in the world. To a sincere person, entering into friendship is like entering the gates of heaven; and a visit to his friend is a pilgrimage to a true loving friend.

When, in friendship, a thought arises, 'I will love you as you love me,' or, 'I will do to you as you do to me,' this takes away all the virtue of the friendship, because it is a commercial attitude, prevalent everywhere in the commercial world: everything is done for a return, and measure is given for measure. ... One ought to look upon acquaintanceship as the sowing of the seed of friendship, not as a situation forced upon one; for those who turn their backs on a man and look at him with contempt also do that to God. To think, 'That person is perhaps of no value; that person is of no importance,' is impractical, besides being unkind. As all things have their use, both flowers and thorns, both sweet and bitter, so all men are of some use; what position, what class, what race, what caste they belong to makes no difference.

Friendship with good and bad, with wise and foolish, with high and low, is equally beneficial, whether to yourself or to the other. What does it matter if another be benefited by your friendship, since you would like to be benefited by someone else's friendship? He is wise who treats an acquaintance as a friend, and he is foolish who treats a friend as an acquaintance, and he is impossible who treats friends and acquaintances as strangers; you cannot help him.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_4.htm



   ~~~ He is wise who treats an acquaintance as a friend, and he is foolish who treats a friend as an acquaintance, and he is impossible who treats friends and acquaintances as strangers -- you cannot help him.


Volume III: The Art of Personality
https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_4.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 20, 2018 10:14 am
Yea many people have difficulty being good friends...but for me spiritual friends are the ones to really hold on to...many people can bring your thoughts and consciousness downward.. These people are like ants...they just exist... They do not inspire or are very conscious. It is a lack of seeking and interest that makes them automatons...victims of their environment. Awareness and the quest for awareness sets human beings apart from other creatures. But most people just exist...what a waste of our time to be with such people. I really make attempts to be kind to others Eric. It is really a treasure when someone like you reciprocates.
Most people just don't understand reciprocity. Its hard to have an endurung relationship if its all one way. It's rare to find someone like Amma who can continue giving without end and needs no reciprocity. I suppose there is simething to learn in that.
I just can be left feeling empty by people who take and take and just have no ability to give in return. Maybe there is a lesson in it for me as well...i try to remain open to all possibilities. Life is for learning and expanding our attitudes and behaviors beyond our set rigid attitudes. So what do you think?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 20, 2018 04:49 pm
Good morning Steve,
I think you're right. I also hope that I am not seen as a waste of time, and while I am far from the Sufi ideal I hope to incorporate more of its teachings into my life which means recognizing that every person here has a purpose and is a part of Gods creation. I think no one can truly judge another person save God. While we make our inferences, perhaps a necessity in our evolution, if one were to adapt the Sufi ideal then they see their service with others- as devotion to God. Perhaps this is how Amma views it, whether the person is deserving or not... Inayat Khan describes friendship as a commercial attitude vs a genuine attempt at practicing Love, which is an ideal that elevates one to living a more spiritually fulfilled life.

I think too many times I fall back on this commercial attitude, even now, I display very selfish tricks to get something in return... I.E speaking to multiple girls for physical release without much consideration to the spiritual aspect of what's happening. Yup... I need to work on this and learn to tame myself...

Anyways, I guess what I am saying is... It's okay to feel this way, and I think even viewing reality in this manner has helped you along your journey... And I venture to say, your view on people may change the further along this journey you go. I agree that when a genuine relationship is reciprocated, it can feel like Heaven.

Lastly, if you've not read the art of personality in the last link provided(which is where the portion of yesterdays saki originates from) I would like to provide the last segment on servicing God for you to consider...

Before I do... I don't know how Inayat Khan and this website does it... I swear it's like my findings in here are perfectly orchestrated with my life endeavors and my many failing's.... I find the right inspiration at the right time and it penetrates my Heart... So I take this to be a sign... I will continue to follow this path... I appreciate Mr. Khan's illuminations and all those who share their insights in walking a Spiritual Life...



Here you go:
Quote
OUR DEALINGS WITH GOD
God is the ideal that raises mankind to the utmost reach of perfection. As man considers and judges his dealings with man in his conscience, so the real worshipper of God considers his dealings with God. If he has helped anybody, if he has been kind to anybody, if he has made sacrifices for anybody, he does not look for appreciation or return for his doing so to the people to whom he has done good; for he considers that he has done it for God, and therefore, his account is with God, not with those with whom he has dealt. He does not care even if instead of praising they blame him; for in any case he has done it for God, who is the best judge and the knower of all things.

There is no ideal that can raise the moral standard higher than the God-ideal, although love is the root of all and God is the fruit of this. Love's expansion and love's culmination and love's progress all depend upon the God-ideal. How much a man fears his friend, his neighbor, when he does something that might offend him whom he loves, whom he respects; and yet how narrow is his goodness when it is only for one person or for certain people! Imagine if he had the same consideration for God, then he would be considerate everywhere and in dealing with all people; as in a verse of a Sufi which says, 'Everywhere I go I find Thy sacred dwelling-place; and whichever side I look I see Thy beautiful face, my Beloved.'

Love for God is the expansion of the heart, and all actions that come from the lover of God are virtues; they cannot be otherwise. There is a different outlook on life when the love of God has filled a man's heart. The lover of God will not hate anyone; for he knows that by doing so he will hate the Creator by hating His creation. He cannot be insincere, he cannot be unfaithful; for he will think that to be faithful and sincere to mankind is to be faithful and sincere to God. You can always trust the lover of God, however impractical or however lacking in cleverness he may appear to be, for simply to hold strongly in mind the thought of God purifies the soul of all bitterness, and gives man a virtue that he could obtain nowhere else and by no other means.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on May 22, 2018 06:00 am
The presence of alternate views brings constructive change and reevaluation of our own attitudes and approach to reality and other people Eric. If we, on the other hand, remain entrenched in our own views we become rigid and unable to embrace a more inclusive view of the universe which will expand our consciousness.  So we become psychological antques. So i think the very presence of your take on spiritual discipline and evolution can by contrast help everyone elses who comes here.

For most of us change does not come over nite but through experiences and repititious lessons provided for us through the grace of the Masters helping us see ourselves like others do and God does. Instead of have having finite views of ourselves and the world around us. So many times i find myself looking here and other places on the forum to find meaningful synchronicities that bring our spiritual link in focus and give me a buzz of awakening.

Many times the warmth of friendship and someone else reaching out towards us in itself shows a concern for our welfare that attracts attention and a listening ear....knowing that another humam being cares about us and hopes to see us grow as an outlut of their expanding consciousness.

For you....you have found a true guru who is able to transmit his spiritual vibration in a way that effects the personal events in your life...this brings the spiritual teachings alive so is contagious for me as well... Watching you go thru theses experiences and knowing that God has brought you in my life to help my own spiritual advancement as well. I know there ate many hard knocks in life....but it is sure wonderful when we are able to recognize that our spiritual guides are helping us thru the the support rather then apparent resistance of circumstances.

When so many things in this life seem temporary unreliable and inconsistant...it is quite a an impression that is left with you when a friend keeps giving support in a common cause and it gives pause to reflect on differences that would otherwise affect many more tenuous relatiinships. Perhaps it is important to consider these things and that i am fortunate to have someone who cares even when i may be obstinate myself and go on in blissful ignorance of my own spiritual recognition.

We see how beautiful friendship can be when people flow together. It makes us recognize that we ourselves can often cause resistance in the cosmic flow. This cosmic flow that runs like sweet sap behind the events. The outward events require much more adjustment and less ease...Especially if we fail to put our relationships in the hands of our spiritual guides for our unfoldment.


Title: Fear Judgment Weakness Strength Humility Patience Release
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 05, 2018 05:56 am
Yet another Home Run with today's saki... I am a bit ashamed to admit this... But I have no doubt played King Fool... Maybe one too many times, I've lost friends and lovers because of it. Even today, while I try harder, I see the outcome has not been as it is desired. I can achieve, I will achieve... I have no doubt in my mind- from the sheer progress... Yet I read these teachings from Hazarat Inayat Khan and I can not help but feel I am the weakness he describes, the one whom he makes example of and it is not anything to boast about. As of late, I have realized I am guilty of Gossip- where I've been hurt and shared my experience to a third party for validation. How silly... Today's saki Inayat Khan teaches us the importance of relationships and the sacredness in each. To treat each relationship as a private affair, to hold ones tongue despite the inclination to express and to recognize that if God exist in us all then it is for that and the Hope which transcends you practice these things.

My drums have beaten so loudly lately that I believe I am the cause of the negative impressions, at least residing in them more than positive. You see I've had nothing but good things around me yet in my pursuits to excel and rapidly I've taken many steps backwards or I hold not just myself but others to perhaps unrealistic standards and create a toxic reality- one that corrodes. There's more but it isn't necessary to be so loud... I must retreat... I can't believe I've gone days without meditation... I can't believe the Saki penetrates my soul yet again- this time through my admitted faults and shortcomings... Things I still struggle with.. Yet there is always Hope... And there is a Will, with steady progression. Perhaps it is as he says, it is important to take a step back and see how Creation provides alternative perspectives... Well I am drifting, rambling and assuming my reality is of importance here yet I am inclined to sharing because these lessons are on par and perhaps those reading relate or feel their own torches lit as a result...

So, without further delay:

Quote
The secret of a friend should be kept as one's own secret; the fault of a friend one should hide as one's own fault.

     Bowl of Saki, June 4, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

A very important thing in character-building is to become conscious of one's relationship, obligation, and duty to each person in the world, and not to mix that link and connection which is established between oneself and another with a third person. One must consider that everything that is entrusted to one by any person in life is one's trust, and one must know that to prove true to the confidence of any person in the world is one's sacred obligation. In this manner a harmonious connection is established with everyone; and it is this harmony which attunes the soul to the infinite. ...

Dharma in the language of the Hindus means religion, but the literal meaning of this word is duty. It suggests that one's relation to every person in the world is one's religion; and the more conscientiously one follows it, the more keen one proves in following one's religion. To keep the secret of our friend, our acquaintance, even of someone with whom for a time one has been vexed, is the most sacred obligation. The one who thus realizes his religion would never consider it right to tell another of any harm or hurt he has received from his friend. It is in this way that self-denial is learned; not always by fasting and retiring into the wilderness. ... The one who knows what the relation of friendship is between one soul and another, the tenderness of that connection, its delicacy, its beauty, and its sacredness, that one can enjoy life in its fullness, for he is living; and in this manner he must some day communicate with God. For it is the same bridge that connects two souls in the world, which, once built, becomes the path to God.
   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_1.htm

Quote

A friend, in the true sense of the word, is nearer and closer than our own family, relations, neighbors, nation, and race. The secret of the friend should be kept as one's own secret: the fault of the friend one should hide as one's own fault; the honor of the friend must be considered as one's own honor; an enemy of the friend should be regarded as our enemy; a friend of the friend must be considered as our friend. One must not boast of friendship, but must practice it, for the claimants are so often false. In the despair of the friend, consolation must be given; in the poverty of the friend, support is necessary; in the shortcomings of the friend, overlooking is necessary; in the trouble of the friend, help should be given; with the joy of the friend, rejoicing is right.
   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_3.htm


Please read these volumes of study if you wish to dissect my babble or perhaps even more magical, gain clarity to you own affairs....

In Loving Service...

<3
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik36.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 17, 2018 04:44 am
Quote
Every experience on the physical, astral or mental plane is just a dream before the soul.

     Bowl of Saki, June 16, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Perhaps, ideas of a past or future life brighten the impression of these words


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 17, 2018 05:59 am
Eric I have found that sometimes a third party or friend that knows well a mutual friend has helped me  very much in understanding and dealing with our mutual friend. So I am shedding some different liight on this subject. In this case it was very helpful to evchange info on how the negativity of our friend disrupted our relationship and friendship for both of us. Also we both were empowered in how to deal with the situation.

Yet another Home Run with today's saki... I am a bit ashamed to admit this... But I have no doubt played King Fool... Maybe one too many times, I've lost friends and lovers because of it. Even today, while I try harder, I see the outcome has not been as it is desired. I can achieve, I will achieve... I have no doubt in my mind- from the sheer progress... Yet I read these teachings from Hazarat Inayat Khan and I can not help but feel I am the weakness he describes, the one whom he makes example of and it is not anything to boast about. As of late, I have realized I am guilty of Gossip- where I've been hurt and shared my experience to a third party for validation. How silly... Today's saki Inayat Khan teaches us the importance of relationships and the sacredness in each. To treat each relationship as a private affair, to hold ones tongue despite the inclination to express and to recognize that if God exist in us all then it is for that and the Hope which transcends you practice these things.

My drums have beaten so loudly lately that I believe I am the cause of the negative impressions, at least residing in them more than positive. You see I've had nothing but good things around me yet in my pursuits to excel and rapidly I've taken many steps backwards or I hold not just myself but others to perhaps unrealistic standards and create a toxic reality- one that corrodes. There's more but it isn't necessary to be so loud... I must retreat... I can't believe I've gone days without meditation... I can't believe the Saki penetrates my soul yet again- this time through my admitted faults and shortcomings... Things I still struggle with.. Yet there is always Hope... And there is a Will, with steady progression. Perhaps it is as he says, it is important to take a step back and see how Creation provides alternative perspectives... Well I am drifting, rambling and assuming my reality is of importance here yet I am inclined to sharing because these lessons are on par and perhaps those reading relate or feel their own torches lit as a result...

So, without further delay:

Quote
The secret of a friend should be kept as one's own secret; the fault of a friend one should hide as one's own fault.

     Bowl of Saki, June 4, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

A very important thing in character-building is to become conscious of one's relationship, obligation, and duty to each person in the world, and not to mix that link and connection which is established between oneself and another with a third person. One must consider that everything that is entrusted to one by any person in life is one's trust, and one must know that to prove true to the confidence of any person in the world is one's sacred obligation.

Dharma in the language of the Hindus means religion, but the literal meaning of this word is duty. It suggests that one's relation to every person in the world is one's religion; and the more conscientiously one follows it, the more keen one proves in following one's religion. To keep the secret of our friend, our acquaintance, even of someone with whom for a time one has been vexed, is the most sacred obligation.

Quote

A friend, in the true sense of the word, is nearer and closer than our own family, relations, neighbors, nation, and race. The secret of the friend should be kept as one's own secret: the fault of the friend one should hide as one's own fault; the honor of the friend must be considered as one's own honor; an enemy of the friend should be regarded as our enemy; a friend of the friend must be considered as our friend. One must not boast of friendship, but must practice it, for the claimants are so often false. In the despair of the friend, consolation must be given; in the poverty of the friend, support is necessary; in the shortcomings of the friend, overlooking is necessary; in the trouble of the friend, help should be given; with the joy of the friend, rejoicing is right.
   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_3.htm


Please read these volumes of study if you wish to dissect my babble or perhaps even more magical, gain clarity to you own affairs....

In Loving Service...

<3
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik36.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 17, 2018 03:44 pm
Dear Steve,
Thank you for your interest. Inayat Khan mentions gossip in the writing the art of personality and on character building, I encourage you to read the entire transcript linked below. Of course, when we are involved with our friends itís easy to take things personally... it is amusing to say the least that a Sufi seeks god in the heart of man yet must learn indifference along the path... once you see god working through even those you call an enemy, I can only imagine that love transcends all pains.

despite having this wisdom to fall back on I too find my very nature looking to others for validation and understanding. I think what youíre describing is different from the toxicity and entanglement of gossip. However- gossip, judgements and other transgressions are natural. This article is about mastery over self and will power. despite my shortcomings I continue on That sufism may help me live a life of peace, love and help me find a way to rise above duality.

From studying these works, meditating and finding time to detach from those intimate relationships I am able to gain clarity- sometimes I can understand actions of others even so I think it best to reserve judgement and turn that inwards. Always going back to God in Love.

 Iíve taken snippets from the reading and pasted below. Again this is on how to improve yourself and do not expect you to agree with everything or conform to anything- I share with hopes that it too provides clarity as it does for me...
https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_1.htm
Quote
It must be remembered that one shows lack of nobleness of character by love of gossiping. It is so natural, and yet it is a great fault in the character to cherish the tendency to talk about others. One shows a great weakness when one makes remarks about someone behind his back. In the first place it is against what may be called frankness, and also it is judging another, which is wrong according to the teaching of Christ, who says, 'Judge not, that ye be not judged'. When one allows this tendency to remain in one, one develops love of talking about others. It is a defect which commonly exists, and when two people meet who have the same tendency, they gossip together. One helps the other, one encourages the other. And when something is supported by two people of necessity it becomes a virtue, if only for the time being.
...
How few in this world know what an effect it makes on one's personality, talking ill of another; what influence it has on one's soul! Man's self within is not only like a dome where everything he says has an echo, but that echo is creative and productive of what has been said. Every good and bad thing in one's life one develops by taking interest in it. Every fault one has, as long as it is small, one does not notice it; and so one develops the fault till it results in a disappointment
...
every outward manifestation is nothing but a reaction of the inner condition. Therefore the first control that one has to gain is over one's own self, one's inner self, which is done by strengthening the will, and also by understanding life better.
...
In order to practice self-control in all one does in everyday life, the best thing is to develop in one's nature a certain amount of indifference. Every word that is said to one need not be taken to be so important that it upsets one's whole being, disturbs one's balance, and robs one of one's will power. There are things that matter; but there are many things in one's everyday life which do not matter much, and one is often apt to put undue stress upon them.
...
Faults? Everyone has faults. Oneself, one's friend, and one's enemy are all subject to faults. The one who wishes that his own faults should not be disclosed must necessarily consider the same for the others he meets. The one who knows what the relation of friendship is between one soul and another, the tenderness of that connection, its delicacy, its beauty, and its sacredness, that one can enjoy life in its fullness, for he is living; and in this manner he must some day communicate with God. For it is the same bridge that connects two souls in the world, which, once built, becomes the path to God. There is no greater virtue in this world than proving kind and trustworthy to one's friend, worthy of his confidence.
...
Depression, despair, and all manner of sorrow and sadness come from lack of generosity. Where does jealousy come from? Where does envy, aching of the heart come from? It all comes from lack of generosity. A man may not have one single coin to his name, and yet he can be generous, he can be noble, if only he has a large heart of friendly feeling. Life in the world offers every opportunity to a man, whatever be his position in life, to show if he has any spirit of generosity.
Namaste Brother


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 17, 2018 04:03 pm
Dear Steve,
Thank you for your interest. Inayat Khan mentions gossip in the writing the art of personality and on character building, I encourage you to read the entire transcript linked below. Of course, we are very involved with our friends and begin to take things personally... it is amusing to say the least that a Sufi seeks god in the heart of man yet must learn indifference along the path... once you see god working through even those you call an enemy, I can only imagine that love transcends all pains.

despite having this wisdom to fall back on I too find my very nature looking to others for validation and understanding- gossip, judgements and other transgressions are natural. This article is about mastery over self and will power. despite my shortcomings I continue on That sufism may help me live a life of peace, love and help me find a way to rise above duality.

From studying these works, meditating and finding time to detach from those intimate relationships I am able to gain clarity- in trying to understand myself I find that I can understand others and when it is less personable you may eventually gain insights to the why when a person behaves in an unpleasant manner even so I find it best to reserve judgement and turn that inwards. Always going back to God in Love.

 Iíve taken snippets from the reading and pasted below. Again this is on how to improve yourself and do not expect you to agree with everything or conform to anything- I share with hopes that it too provides clarity as it does for me...
https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_III_1.htm
Quote
It must be remembered that one shows lack of nobleness of character by love of gossiping. It is so natural, and yet it is a great fault in the character to cherish the tendency to talk about others. One shows a great weakness when one makes remarks about someone behind his back. In the first place it is against what may be called frankness, and also it is judging another, which is wrong according to the teaching of Christ, who says, 'Judge not, that ye be not judged'. When one allows this tendency to remain in one, one develops love of talking about others. It is a defect which commonly exists, and when two people meet who have the same tendency, they gossip together. One helps the other, one encourages the other. And when something is supported by two people of necessity it becomes a virtue, if only for the time being.
...
How few in this world know what an effect it makes on one's personality, talking ill of another; what influence it has on one's soul! Man's self within is not only like a dome where everything he says has an echo, but that echo is creative and productive of what has been said. Every good and bad thing in one's life one develops by taking interest in it. Every fault one has, as long as it is small, one does not notice it; and so one develops the fault till it results in a disappointment
...
every outward manifestation is nothing but a reaction of the inner condition. Therefore the first control that one has to gain is over one's own self, one's inner self, which is done by strengthening the will, and also by understanding life better.
...
In order to practice self-control in all one does in everyday life, the best thing is to develop in one's nature a certain amount of indifference. Every word that is said to one need not be taken to be so important that it upsets one's whole being, disturbs one's balance, and robs one of one's will power. There are things that matter; but there are many things in one's everyday life which do not matter much, and one is often apt to put undue stress upon them.
...
Faults? Everyone has faults. Oneself, one's friend, and one's enemy are all subject to faults. The one who wishes that his own faults should not be disclosed must necessarily consider the same for the others he meets. The one who knows what the relation of friendship is between one soul and another, the tenderness of that connection, its delicacy, its beauty, and its sacredness, that one can enjoy life in its fullness, for he is living; and in this manner he must some day communicate with God. For it is the same bridge that connects two souls in the world, which, once built, becomes the path to God. There is no greater virtue in this world than proving kind and trustworthy to one's friend, worthy of his confidence.
...
Depression, despair, and all manner of sorrow and sadness come from lack of generosity. Where does jealousy come from? Where does envy, aching of the heart come from? It all comes from lack of generosity. A man may not have one single coin to his name, and yet he can be generous, he can be noble, if only he has a large heart of friendly feeling. Life in the world offers every opportunity to a man, whatever be his position in life, to show if he has any spirit of generosity.
Namaste Brother

I continue to read your captions with interest. However sometimes even friends can abuse us and do not always treat us in ways that are fair or kind. Often we understand this thru the treatment dealt out to us to others as well and that some people expect too much and are unwilling to reciprocate no matter how much u may explain this concept of repriprocity. They have their own view that somehow they  are right and will not except any view but their own. Often what may be considered gossip is in fact reacurring behavior that is rigid in nature and goes unnnoticed until verified under different conditions and with more then one person. Recently I have been told what may be considered gossip and the faults of others that have helped me immensely avoid the continued and further abuse by so called friends. Also in the past I have been told disparaging things about others I considered to be friends which were in fact true and it would have been better if I listened to the so called gossip to save myself a lot of wasted time with people who really did not even have the capability to be true friends.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 17, 2018 04:23 pm
Hi Steve,
Sorry I was writing very quickly without much time to construct my thoughts and words(rushed to work this morning) and would like to think more on what you said. I went back to try and clarify that understanding and gossip may be two different realities, I donít think you go about talking illy of this person- just that something was not right and needed further understanding in yourself. If someone thinks they are right, We donít need to invest so much energy trying to figure them out... why? in these moments I find myself rushing back to god in meditation and looking to detach and love. I have friends who tread different paths- itís not for me to count what is owed or what is right or wrong, just that I can share in Love to the best of my ability with the personal belief that is a service and brings me closer to God. Real magic happens around this understanding...

Peace bro <3


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Dr. Suess on Jun 18, 2018 08:48 am
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. Right?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 18, 2018 01:12 pm
Hi Steve,
Sorry I was writing very quickly without much time to construct my thoughts and words(rushed to work this morning) and would like to think more on what you said. I went back to try and clarify that understanding and gossip may be two different realities, I donít think you go about talking illy of this person- just that something was not right and needed further understanding in yourself. If someone thinks they are right, We donít need to invest so much energy trying to figure them out... why? in these moments I find myself rushing back to god in meditation and looking to detach and love. I have friends who tread different paths- itís not for me to count what is owed or what is right or wrong, just that I can share in Love to the best of my ability with the personal belief that is a service and brings me closer to God. Real magic happens around this understanding...

Peace bro <3

I think that we occasionally get these insights like Ď oh I see what this is about now. Itís all about you and does not include any of me. Itís like a rut you dug and find it easy to go down and want me to do the same without question. Whatís easy for me should be the same for you. But we may have a different way of lookin at it. Like letís try something different too and see where that goes. But the other person is like no iím Used to my way and your causin too much work for me.... so you might just have to pause for reflection and see where u have really started off in a meaningful direction even though a close friend may not see it that way. We can still be very appreciative for the times our friends have and will go out of the way to help and assist us when we have been in need while recognizing the pot holes people get into and just feel comfortable staying in them.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 19, 2018 10:07 am
Meeting new people or making new friends, and perhaps spending less time with friendships that have grown stale, tired or dated can also be a new circumstance.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 19, 2018 09:41 pm
Meeting new people or making new friends, and perhaps spending less time with friendships that have grown stale, tired or dated can also be a new circumstance.
I think it is a tragedy to view any friendship as stale, draining or dated- yet it is reality, so do we consider these old relationships friends or acquaintances  ... all the more reason I wish to cultivate indifference and love for the human experience ... maybe itís a fools desire to want others to feel love when they think of you, worrying to much about the wrong thing or persons... how to reside in gods love and feel gods love so these things donít matter... that seems good enough
If I can just relinquish these thoughts that are constantly pulling me away from inner peace


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 19, 2018 09:42 pm
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. Right?
:)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 21, 2018 05:48 am
Dear Jitendra,
I find that Amma and Inayat Khan indeed, Sufism are very similar. Both recognize that each soul has a unique path and what matters are the divine qualities- even in those who call themselves atheist. It's all for Love. The greatest message is to simply Love. True, our ego often conflicts with this awareness. Yet it is both Amma and Inayat Khan who teach- Faith & Awareness are the greatest tools to transcending duality, to being a great benefactor to society and to meeting face to face with our truest spiritual selves.


I would definitely call Amma a deva. I also think she is a true guru who has the ability to guide her disciples to enlightenment and she has given them the tool of the iam technique of meditation and many other helpful tecchniques to spiritualize consciousness and free us from delusion. Her unique path lies in the idea that no one has to change their religion to join her only practice their own religion. While Amma is widely regarded as one of Indiaís foremost spiritual leaders, Amma says that her religion is love. She has never asked anyone to change their religion but only to contemplate the essential principles of their own faith and to try to live accordingly.
Looking back, I think it is a trap to worry about what others think. The past is just that and as Amma herself says, we do not live in our storage. Draw from storage if we must but do not reside there. As Wahiduddin so graciously transmits, describe yourself as a Verb not a Noun. We are forever changing, striving towards perfection. And, as Murshid Inayat Khan elaborates in today's Saki-

Quote
Love lies in service; only that which is done not for fame or name, not for the appreciation or thanks of those for whom it is done, is love's service.

     Bowl of Saki, June 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


Love lies in service. Only that which is done, not for fame or name, nor for the appreciation or thanks of those for whom it is done, is love's service.

The lover shows kindness and beneficence to the beloved. He does whatever he can for the beloved in the way of help, service, sacrifice, kindness, or rescue, and hides it from the world and even from the beloved. If the beloved does anything for him he exaggerates it, idealizes it, makes it into a mountain from a molehill. He takes poison from the hands of the beloved as sugar, and love's pain in the wound of his heart is his only joy. By magnifying and idealizing whatever the beloved does for him and by diminishing and forgetting whatever he himself does for the beloved, he first develops his own gratitude, which creates all goodness in his life.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_22.htm


The Sufi moral is this: Love another and do not depend upon his love; and: Do good to another and do not depend upon receiving good from him; serve another and do not look for service from him. All you do for another out of your love and kindness, you should think that you do, not to that person, but to God. And if the person returns love for love, goodness for goodness, service for service, so much the better. If he does not return it, then pity him for what he loses; for his gain is much less than his loss.

Do not look for thanks or appreciation for all the good you do to others, nor use it as a means to stimulate your vanity. Do all that you consider good for the sake of goodness, not even for a return of that from God.

   ~~~ "Sangatha I, Saluk", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)



   ~~~ Love lies in service; only that which is done not for fame or name, not for the appreciation or thanks of those for whom it is done, is love's service.
And so it is, the very God we run towards Loves regardless of what mankind understands as good or bad- Loves despite ones transgressions and what others may deem annoyances or even dullness. And what truly blows my mind are how both Inayat Khan and Mata Amritanandamayi both seek God in the heart of man- the very essence of Sufi religion.

In this awareness, each moment is a true work of Wonder... We can shed our past...
And I am reminded still, to enjoy the moment and Flow~ That our time here is very short when compared to the Everlasting. Finding inner peace can really make this place Heaven on Earth...

Namaste Brother. _^_ ~~~~
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik3.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 28, 2018 03:31 pm
Todayís saki affirms my belief to rising above awareness of negative entrapment


The awakened heart says, "I must give, I must not demand." Thus it enters a gate that leads to a constant happiness.

     Bowl of Saki, June 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

An unhappy person, being himself unhappy, cannot make others happy. It is a wealthy person who can help the one who is hard up, not a poor person, however much desire of helping he may have. So it is with happiness, which is a great wealth; and a happy person can take away the unhappiness of another, for he has enough for himself and for others.

Earthly pleasures are the shadows of happiness; because of their transitory character. True happiness is in love, which is the stream that springs from one's soul. He who will allow this stream to run continually in all conditions of life, in all situations, however difficult, will have a happiness which truly belongs to him, the source of which is not without, but within. If there is a constant outpouring of love one becomes a divine fountain, for from the depth of the fountain rises the stream and, on its return, it pours upon the fountain, bathing it continually.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_17.htm


Why does a mystic attribute such great importance to harmony? Because to a mystic, his whole life is one continuous symphony, a playing of music, with each soul contributing his particular part to the symphony. A person's success therefore depends upon the idea he has of harmony. Very few people in the world pay attention to harmony. They do not know that without it, there is no chance of happiness. It is only the harmonious ones who can make others happy and partake of that happiness themselves; and apart from them, it is hard to find happiness in the world.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_8.htm


The method of attainment is to endeavor always to make others happy and by experiencing happiness in the happiness of others. In the terms of the Sufi, it is Suluk. Any selfishness prevents us from appreciating another's happiness and therefore we shall be kept back, for the happiness of others is the gate to our own happiness. Real happiness is entering the gate. We must feel satisfaction in another's satisfaction ... If a person needs a certain thing and we can supply it, we should be happy, how ever small the thing may be.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/archives/constancy.htm



   ~~~ The awakened heart says, "I must give, I must not demand."  Thus it enters a gate that leads to a constant happiness.



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 04, 2018 05:05 am
   
Man must first create peace in himself if he desires to see peace in the world; for lacking peace within, no effort of his can bring any result.

     Bowl of Saki, July 2, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

<wisdom> from a spiritual friend and a great teacher inayat khan <blessings>


.............

and what brings this peace? it is going within, focusing on the breath, dissolving these idea's of what who or why and opening ourselves up to the wonders of God, which surpass our limitations. Gods Love is so Great, no wonder we are constantly running back to him in our sincerer moments, which instills peace that raises the vibrations and shatters oppositions. 


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 27, 2018 03:37 pm
todays message seems to touch on the name change here at the portal.  :D


Belief and disbelief have divided mankind into so many sects, blinding its eyes to the vision of the oneness of all life.

     Bowl of Saki, July 27, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

For the Sufi there exists no one in this world, neither heathen nor pagan, who is to be despised, for he believes in that God who is not the God of one chosen sect but the God of the whole world. He does not believe in a God of one nation, but in the God of all nations. To him God is in all different houses where people worship Him. Even if they stand in the street and pray it makes no difference to him. The holy place is wherever He is worshipped. The Sufi leaves sectarianism to the sects. He has respect for all; he is not prejudiced against any and he does not despise any; he feels sympathy for all.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_33.htm


The religion of the mystic is a steady progress towards unity. How does he make this progress? In two ways. In the first way, he sees himself in others, in the good, in the bad, in all; and thus, he expands the horizon of his vision. This study goes on throughout his lifetime; and as he progresses he comes closer to the oneness of all things. The other way of developing is to become conscious of one's own self in God and of God in one's self, which means deepening the consciousness of our innermost being. This process takes place in two directions: outwardly, by being one with all we see; and inwardly, by being in touch with that one Life which is everlasting, by dissolving into it and by being conscious of that one Spirit being THE existence, the only existence.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_1.htm


'There is One God, the Eternal, the Only Being; none exists save He.' The God of the Sufi is the God of every creed, and the God of all. Names make no difference to him. Allah, God, Gott, Dieu, Khuda, Brahma, or Bhagwan, all these names and more are the names of his God; and yet to him God is beyond the limitation of name. He sees his God in the sun, in the fire, in the idol which diverse sects worship; and he recognizes Him in all the forms of the universe, yet knowing Him to be beyond all form; God in all, and all in God, He being the Seen and the Unseen, the Only Being.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_I_1.htm



   ~~~ Belief and disbelief have divided mankind into so many sects, blinding its eyes to the vision of the oneness of all life.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik28.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 16, 2018 06:30 am
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
To become cold from the coldness of the world is weakness, to become broken by the hardness of the world is feebleness, but to live in the world and yet to keep above it is like walking on the water.

     Bowl of Saki, September 15, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


The spiritual path is easiest if there is not something pulling one from behind; and that force is the life in the world, one's friends, surroundings, acquaintances, and one's foes. Remain, therefore, in the world as a traveler making a station on his way. Do all the good you can to serve and succor humanity, but escape attachment. By this in no way will you prove to be loveless. On the contrary, it is attachment which divides love, and love raised above attachment is like a rain from above nourishing all the plants upon the earth.

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik12.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Sep 16, 2018 10:02 pm
Thanks for your contributions here Eric; I always read them and think of you daily!


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 09, 2018 09:12 am
The whole purpose of life is to make God a reality.

     Bowl of Saki, October 9, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

As to the religion and the moral of the mystic, the mystic has one moral and that is love. And he has one aim in his religion and that is to make a God a reality. Therefore, his God becomes a greater God than the God of millions of people who only imagine that there is a God somewhere. To him God is a reality.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_2.htm
(https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fi2.wp.com%2Fwww.sampleloveletter.net%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2015%2F02%2F9.jpg&f=1)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 06, 2018 03:49 pm
Our soul is blessed with the impression of the glory of God whenever we praise Him.

     Bowl of Saki, November 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

by Swami Vivekananda:

You are the omniscient, omnipresent being of the universe. But of such beings can there be many? Can there be a hundred thousand millions of omnipresent beings? Certainly not. Then, what becomes of us all? You are only one; there is only one such Self, and that One Self is you. Standing behind this little nature is what we call the Soul. There is only One Being, One Existence, the ever-blessed, the omnipresent, the omniscient, the birthless, deathless.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 05, 2018 06:08 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/12_05_18.jpg)

Far from it but I think this is the destination for many of us on the spiritual path.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Dec 18, 2018 06:17 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/12_18_18.jpg)
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 03, 2019 07:07 am
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/01_02_19.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jan 21, 2019 03:50 am
To treat every human being as a shrine of God is to fulfill all religion.

     Bowl of Saki, January 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

This is something I believe in but find difficulty in being able to live up to every day. Maybe it's because for most, those who've raised us do not always consider the indwelling spirit in them to be God. Maybe it's because the idea's of how this expression "should be" have been romanticized and brought about expectations and suffering. Then there's the habits we've knowingly, unknowingly embraced or demonstrated over the course of our lives that step on beauty. It's important we continue to try, even if our efforts are misinterpreted by others or that we do fall short- continue to aim high and continue to meditate. Knowing we are born in limitation, persistence towards the ideal is the best we can hope for, returning more and more to Stillness...

I am also going to quote Lahiri Mahasaya here...
ďAlways remember that you belong to no one, and no one belongs to you. Reflect that some day you will suddenly have to leave everything in this world so make the acquaintanceship of God now. Prepare yourself for the coming astral journey of death by daily riding in the balloon of God-perception. Through delusion you are perceiving yourself as a bundle of flesh and bones, which at best is a nest of troubles. Meditate unceasingly, that you may quickly behold yourself as the Infinite Essence, free from every form of misery. Cease being a prisoner of the body; using the secret key of Kriya, learn to escape into Spirit.Ē


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Feb 10, 2019 05:18 am
 Love brought man from the world of unity to that of variety, and the same force can take him back again to the world of unity from the world of variety.

     Bowl of Saki, February 9, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Mar 17, 2019 07:36 am
Quote
At every step of evolution, man's realization of God changes.

     Bowl of Saki, March 16, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

There is a time when toys are treasures. But the child who cries for a toy comes to an age when he gives it away. And at every step in a man's evolution the values of power and position and wealth change in his eyes. And so as he evolves there arises in him a spirit of renunciation which may be called the Spirit of God. Gradually he recognizes the real value of those fair and lovely qualities of the spirit that change not.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/III/III_II_15.htm
(https://wahiduddin.net/hik/images/hik-5-450w.jpg)
<3 <3 <3


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Mar 25, 2019 11:28 am
But what I have noticed is when there is sadness around me...I often have sad dreams. The environment affects us in a subtle manner that reacts on a subconscious level. In the spirit of renunciation I will often tell a woman who is quite attractive to me of my intense interest in Amma. Sending someone a link can offer insight into another person. They may just ask you not to respond to them. Or on the contrary they May recognize The significance of the information. Even curiosity shows some receptivity.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
To become cold from the coldness of the world is weakness, to become broken by the hardness of the world is feebleness, but to live in the world and yet to keep above it is like walking on the water.

     Bowl of Saki, September 15, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan


The spiritual path is easiest if there is not something pulling one from behind; and that force is the life in the world, one's friends, surroundings, acquaintances, and one's foes. Remain, therefore, in the world as a traveler making a station on his way. Do all the good you can to serve and succor humanity, but escape attachment. By this in no way will you prove to be loveless. On the contrary, it is attachment which divides love, and love raised above attachment is like a rain from above nourishing all the plants upon the earth.

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik12.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Apr 01, 2019 05:51 pm
Happy 1st of April  :) This is a beautiful thing to wake up to... Inayat Khan says the two important things in life are praise of God and the pursuit of God. That the secret of happiness comes from continued practice in giving thanks to all the blessings we have in our life- admiring every glimpse of beauty and kindness that comes before us. If we do this we can send ourselves into a bliss that may be called the kingdom of God.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/04_01_19.jpg)
Quote


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:


"Why does God need praise from me? Who am I that I should offer Him praise?" True, we can never praise Him enough; never can our praise be sufficient, but our souls are blessed with the impression of the Glory of God whenever we praise Him. The soul could praise God every moment and yet wanting to praise Him yet more, it is constantly hungering and thirsting to find the Beauty and Perfection of God. By the praise of God the soul is filled with bliss; even to utter the name of God is a blessing that can fill the soul with light, joy and happiness as nothing else can do.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/archives/prayer.htm


There is a necessity for praise in prayer, praise of the beauty of God, for man must learn to recognize and praise the beauty of God as manifested in all His creation. In this way he impresses beauty on his soul, and he is able to manifest it in himself, and he becomes the friend of all and is without prejudice. For this reason the Sufi cultivates his heart. The emblem of the Sufi is a heart between two wings, meaning that when the heart is cultivated man can soar up into the heights of heaven.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_34.htm


The only secret of attaining happiness is to learn how to appreciate our privileges in life. If we cultivate that sense of appreciation we shall be thankful, we shall be contented and every moment we shall offer our thanks to God, for His gifts are many and enormous. When we do not see them it is because our wants cover our eyes from seeing all with which we are blessed by Providence. No meditation, no study, nothing can help in that direction, except one thing, and that is to keep our eyes open to appreciate every little privilege in life, to admire every glimpse of beauty that comes before us, being thankful for every little love, kindness or affection shown to us by young or old, rich or poor, wise or foolish. In this way, continually developing the faculty of appreciating life and devoting it to thanksgiving, we arrive at a bliss which no words can explain, a bliss which is beyond imagination: the bliss that we find ourselves having already entered the kingdom of God.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_39.htm


The two important things in life are the praise of God and the pursuit of God. The praise of God is important, and it gives bliss in life, but it is not the real attainment. The all-important work in life is the attainment of God. God cannot be explained. Any attempt to do this always ends in failure. The knowledge of Him can only be attained in the silence and in solitude, and how to do this cannot be explained better than in the words of the Urdu poet Zahir, 'He who attaineth best the peace of God, his very self must lose.'

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_38.htm



   ~~~ When one praises the beauty of God, one's soul is filled with bliss.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 02, 2019 06:55 pm
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-i8r_R_L2d_Q/UQfGdZufaVI/AAAAAAAAfNA/4jRlSS40EkY/s1600/mountains_stones_night_moon_4722_1280x1024.jpg)

The truth need not be veiled, for it veils itself from the eyes of the ignorant.

     Bowl of Saki, May 2, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

"Truth is vaster than any frame we can make to put it in. Besides, no matter what frame we make for truth to be presented in, an unawakened soul will never see it, but will only see the frame."

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_III_1.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on May 14, 2019 07:03 am
Our limited self is a wall separating us from the Self of God.

     Bowl of Saki, May 13, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

In order to reach spiritual perfection the first thing is to destroy this false self. First this delusion must be destroyed. And this is done by the ways taught by the great teachers, ways of concentration and meditation, by the power of which one forgets oneself and removes one's consciousness from oneself, in other words rises from one's limited being. In this way a person effaces himself from his own consciousness, and places God in his consciousness instead of his limited self. And it is in this way that he arrives at that perfection which every soul is seeking.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_26.htm


Real justice cannot be perceived until the veil of selfishness has been removed from his eyes. The least spark of selfishness will prevent man from being just; he will continue to have a partial interest, because he will be looking after his own interest. Whatever furthers his own interests, he will call his right and his justice.

The prophets and the holy ones have all recognized the justice of God as the only real justice. What is the nature of the justice of God? It cannot be read in scripture; it cannot be learned from a book; it can only be learned from the Self within after selfishness has been removed. Our limited self is like a wall separating us from the Self of God. God is as far away from us as that wall is thick.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_23.htm



   ~~~ Our limited self is a wall separating us from the self of God.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 07, 2019 07:45 am
We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world.

     Bowl of Saki, June 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Externally we are a single being, but internally we are a world. As vast as is the world around us, so vast is the world within. Asif says, 'The limitation of the sky and land cannot be compared with man's heart. If man's heart be wide, there is nothing wider than this.' All can be accommodated in it; heaven earth, sun, moon, all are reflected in it. It becomes itself the whole. This world becomes as one chooses to make it. If man only knew that! But since he does not know that, the world is not heaven, but has become its opposite. We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world; that our world has an influence upon our life within as well as upon our life without.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_17.htm


One learns to understand that there is a world in one's self, that in one's mind there is a source of happiness and unhappiness, the source of health and illness, the source of light and darkness, and that it can be awakened, either mechanically or at will, if only one knew how to do it. Then one does not blame his ill fortune nor complain of his fellow man. He becomes more tolerant, more joyful, and more loving toward his neighbor, because he knows the cause of every thought and action, and he sees it all as the effect of a certain cause.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 07, 2019 07:53 am
But what I have noticed is when there is sadness around me...I often have sad dreams. The environment affects us in a subtle manner that reacts on a subconscious level. In the spirit of renunciation I will often tell a woman who is quite attractive to me of my intense interest in Amma. Sending someone a link can offer insight into another person. They may just ask you not to respond to them. Or on the contrary they May recognize The significance of the information. Even curiosity shows some receptivity.

Steve is this sadness the result of someone else crushing your desire or subconscious expectations?
Sometimes I will have sad and even horrific dreams which is why I find counting our blessings such a valuable practice.
Onward and upward my friend. <3
 


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jun 07, 2019 01:36 pm
We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world.

     Bowl of Saki, June 6, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Externally we are a single being, but internally we are a world. As vast as is the world around us, so vast is the world within. Asif says, 'The limitation of the sky and land cannot be compared with man's heart. If man's heart be wide, there is nothing wider than this.' All can be accommodated in it; heaven earth, sun, moon, all are reflected in it. It becomes itself the whole. This world becomes as one chooses to make it. If man only knew that! But since he does not know that, the world is not heaven, but has become its opposite. We blame others for our sorrows and misfortunes, not perceiving that we ourselves are the creators of our world; that our world has an influence upon our life within as well as upon our life without.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_17.htm


One learns to understand that there is a world in one's self, that in one's mind there is a source of happiness and unhappiness, the source of health and illness, the source of light and darkness, and that it can be awakened, either mechanically or at will, if only one knew how to do it. Then one does not blame his ill fortune nor complain of his fellow man. He becomes more tolerant, more joyful, and more loving toward his neighbor, because he knows the cause of every thought and action, and he sees it all as the effect of a certain cause.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_5.htm


I think that it is important to put the question you asked me in perspective Eric. You took my quote from another thread that has relevancy to you to this thread. Since you asked a question in your last entry I will respond to why I think you asked that question by giving the topic that it appears to relate about. I agree with everything thing that Inayat Khan has said here; Our reality that we experience is created by ourselves. We can also be cognizant of elements of that reality unfolding before us in our dreams and our consciousness.

To give an example a Master like Inayat Khan or Amma can foresee certain conditions or events or know the consciousness of another being that comes to them. That state of being may not be anything they created but rather they know what they are witnessing. So in this sense, it is a witness state of consciousness and, it is not something that they are attached to which they identify with and have sadness as a result of someone else ďcrushing their desire or subconscious expectations.Ē I would not go so far as to say in all my experiences I am a witness to what I experience and have no personal identification with those experiences but it is something that we aspire towards. Thoughtful question you posed here and a good way to react to our experiences; ďI find counting our blessings such a valuable practice.Ē Isnít it important to be responsive and not reactionary in all our encounters in life?


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 28, 2019 08:11 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/06_28_19.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jun 30, 2019 05:31 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/06_30_19.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 02, 2019 02:06 am
Happy July 1st Divine Friends.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/07_01_19.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 02, 2019 01:54 pm
Happy July 1st Divine Friends.
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/07_01_19.jpg)

I wonder if this is as much of a concern when we are not in a position to be rewarded in using it? Hope you follow what I am saying dear friend. Some of us live a humble life. We are humbled by circumstances.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 02, 2019 11:32 pm
Hi Steve,
I don't understand what you're talking about. Today's message reflects the teachings of the other masters discussed here... The battle-cry of Gurunath, "Self peace for world peace"
Quote
Man must first create peace in himself if he desires to see peace in the world; for lacking peace within, no effort of his can bring any result.

     Bowl of Saki, July 2, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 03, 2019 11:00 am
Peace in the world is quite a different idea than pride in knowledge. I think I have met many college professors who had pride in knowledge. There was really no other way of looking at a subject for them except there own view. You can see that in most people in many subjects. But when someone is given a title they often seem to get more dogmatic then people who have more humble lives. Iím just saying that many simple people have such a humble life that they are not in a position to have pride of knowledge.

Its often the more someone has financially and in titles quite often the more they think they are right. Perhaps you see it differently. You have people who will ignore all the evidence provided and make up their own philosophy to justify their pride and satisfaction in what they think they know in their given field; for instance Trump trying to run our country like a business that has a singular vision of Americans first without seeing the larger view of his destroying the earth.

Hi Steve,
I don't understand what you're talking about. Today's message reflects the teachings of the other masters discussed here... The battle-cry of Gurunath, "Self peace for world peace"
Quote
Man must first create peace in himself if he desires to see peace in the world; for lacking peace within, no effort of his can bring any result.

     Bowl of Saki, July 2, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 17, 2019 04:37 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/07_17_19.jpg)
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

We frequently say, 'I dislike him,' 'I wish to avoid her,' but if we examine this carefully, we find it is the same element in all that we dislike, the ego. And when we turn to ourselves to see if we have it in us, we find it is there too. We should forget it, therefore, in other people, and first turn our attention to crushing it within ourselves. We should determine to have our house clean even if other people neglect theirs. We should be careful to take away from ourselves any thorns that prick us in the personality of others. There is a verse in the Quran, which says, 'Arise in the midst of the night, and commune with thy Lord... Bear patiently what others say.' This is not only a command to rise in the night and pray, but it also means that by rising in the night we crush the ego, for the ego demands its rest and comfort, and when denied, is crushed. The mystics fast for the same reason. The Sufis base the whole of their teaching on the crushing of the ego which they term Nafs-kushi, for therein lies all magnetism and power.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_27.htm


For every soul there are four stages to pass through in order to come to the culmination of the ego, which means to reach the stage of the rose. The first stage is that a person is rough, thoughtless and inconsiderate. He is interested in what he wants and in what he likes; as such he is naturally blind to the needs and wants of others. In the second stage a man is decent and good as long as his interests are concerned. As long as he can get his wish fulfilled he is pleasant and kind and good and harmonious; but if he cannot get his wish and cannot have his way, then he becomes rough and crude and changes completely. And there is a third stage, when someone is more concerned with another person's wish and desire, and less with himself; when his whole heart is seeking for what he can do for another. In his thought the other person comes first and he comes afterwards. That is the beginning of turning into the rose. It is only a rosebud, but then in the fourth stage this rosebud blooms in the person who entirely forgets himself in doing kind deeds for others. In Sufi terms the crushing of the ego is called Nafs Kushi.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_40.htm



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 21, 2019 07:13 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/fb_posts/07_21_19.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 21, 2019 07:13 pm
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

There are two ways in which we may attain control over our activity. The first is confidence in the power of our own will; to know that if we have failed today, tomorrow we will not do so. The second is to have our eyes wide open, and to watch keenly our activity in all aspects of life. It is in the dark that we fall, but in the light we can see where we are going.

So it is in life: we should have our eyes wide open to see where we walk. We should study life, and seek to know why we say a thing, and why we act as we do. We have failed perhaps hitherto because we have not been wide awake. We have fallen, and felt sorry, and have forgotten all about it, and perhaps may have fallen again. This is because we have not studied life. A study of life is the greatest of all religions, and there is no greater and more interesting study. Those who have mastered all grades of activity, they above all experience life in all its aspects. They are like swimmers in the sea who float on the water of life and do not sink.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_36.htm


If we only knew how much the study of life can tell us! One could go into the British Museum and read every book in the building, and yet not obtain satisfaction. It is not study, it is not research, it is not inquiry which gives this knowledge; it is actually going through the experiences of life, witnessing life in its different aspects and in its different phases or spheres; that is what reveals the ideal of life. ... Look not on life as a person would watch a play on the stage. Rather look upon it as a student who is learning at college.

It is not a passing show; it is not a place of amusement in which to fool our life away. It is a place for study, in which every sorrow, every heartbreak brings a precious lesson. It is a place in which to learn by one's own suffering, by the study of the suffering of others; to learn from the people who have been kind to us as well as from the people who have been unkind. It is a place in which all experiences, be they disappointments, struggles, and pains, or joys, pleasures, and comforts, contribute to the understanding of what life is, and the realization what it is. Then do we awake to the religion of nature, which is the only religion. And the more we understand it, the greater our life becomes, and the more of a blessing will our life be for others.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_2.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 25, 2019 05:15 pm
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik82.jpg)
Our spirit is the real part of us, the body but its garment. A man would not find peace at the tailor's because his coat comes from there; neither can the spirit obtain true happiness from the earth just because his body belongs to earth.

Bowl of Saki, July 25, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Jul 26, 2019 01:17 am
(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik82.jpg)
Our spirit is the real part of us, the body but its garment. A man would not find peace at the tailor's because his coat comes from there; neither can the spirit obtain true happiness from the earth just because his body belongs to earth.

Bowl of Saki, July 25, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Itís in sync with my thoughts today; sometimes I get this feeling these bodies that are walking around forever busy are just places are spirits are trapped in while we pay the sentence for our desires. I believe that it is somewhat different in the astral and causal realms where we do not have the same limitations as here. We are actually working out a type of sentence we have caused to our spirits being assigned to come here. But we do have quite a gift in having this experience here in the physical realm to evolve upward and out.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Jul 26, 2019 07:18 am
Thanks Steve, I'm happy to see Spirit is talking to you. To seek God is a beautiful and rewarding journey. I am thankful for the times you've helped keep my course steady homeward and hope to offer the same to you.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 09, 2019 09:31 pm

   ~~~ One word can be more precious than all the treasures of the earth ~~~

The word has a magic in it, it can turn friends into your enemies, and it can make your enemies your friends. The mystery of all success in every direction of life is in the word. The word has power to turn the mind of the listener warm or cold. The word can produce the effect of earth, water, fire, air, or ether. The word can produce depression or joy. The one who knows the chemistry of the word does not need drugs or herbs. He has medicine for every disease in the world, not only for bodily disease, but also for the disorders of the mind, which still remain unexplored by science. By a constant study of life, by special thought given to one's word, by careful watching of the effects of one's speech upon others, one arrives at a state of realization where one can heal hearts.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_6.htm




Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 11, 2019 10:17 am
Quote
When God is with you everything is with you; when God is in you everything is in you. Inspiration, knowledge, light, all are then within you. But if you find joy in confusion, if you confuse yourself and keep yourself in darkness, you may do so. However, you have inherited from the heavenly Father His inspiration, His Light, His power. You have inherited might from the Almighty God; you have inherited light from the Light of the universe. Therefore you are blessed with all these things, if you can only open your eyes and see the blessing.
from https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_11.htm
(http://dreamicus.com/data/light/light-02.jpg)


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Aug 11, 2019 02:55 pm
Terrific and timely entry. Thanks Eric.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Aug 13, 2019 06:46 pm
The lover of nature is the true worshipper of God.

     Bowl of Saki, August 13, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Quote
Anyone who has some knowledge of mysticism and of the lives of the mystics knows that what always attracts the mystic most is nature. Nature is his bread and wine. Nature is his soul's nourishment. Nature inspires him, uplifts him and gives him the solitude for which his soul continually longs. Every soul born with a mystical tendency is constantly drawn towards nature; in nature that soul finds its life's demand, as it is said in the Vadan, 'Art is dear to my heart, but nature is near to my soul'. ... Nature does not teach the glory of God; it need not teach this as nature itself is the glory of God. People wish to study astrology and other subjects in order to understand better, but if we study astrology then we are sure to arrive at an interpretation which is given by a man, whereas what we should read from nature is what nature gives us and not what any book teaches us.

There comes a time with the maturity of the soul when every thing and every being begins to reveal its nature to us. We do not need to read their lives. We do not need to read their theories. We know then that this wide nature in its four aspects is ever-revealing and that one can always communicate with it, but that in spite of this it is not the privilege of every soul to read it. Many souls remain blind with open eyes. They are in heaven, but not allowed to look at heaven; they are in paradise, but not allowed to enjoy the beauties of paradise. It is just like a person sleeping on a pile of gems and jewels. From the moment man's eyes open and he begins to read the book of nature he begins to live; and he continues to live forever.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_7.htm

So it is with our practices, to seek God and to find him in All things.

Quote
A true worshipper of God sees His presence in all forms, and thus in respecting others he respects God. It may even develop to such an extent that the true worshipper of God, the Omnipresent, walks gently on the earth, bowing in his heart even to every tree and plant, and it is then that the worshipper forms a communion with the Divine Beloved at all times, when he is awake and when he is asleep.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_15.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 05, 2019 05:39 am
My murshid, Abu Hashim Madani, once said that there is only one virtue and only one sin for a soul on this path: virtue when he is conscious of God and sin when he is not. No explanation can describe the truth of this except the experience of the contemplative, to whom, when he is conscious of God, it is as if a window is open, which is facing heaven, and when he is conscious of the self, the experience is the opposite. For all the tragedy of life is caused by consciousness of the self. All pain and depression are caused by this, and anything that can take away the thought of the self helps to a certain extent to relieve man from pain; but God-consciousness gives perfect relief.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_10.htm


Pleasure blocks, but pain clears the way of inspiration.


Bowl of Saki, September 4, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

(https://wahiduddin.net/saki/images/hik23.jpg)

Tagore says: 'When the string of the violin was being tuned it felt the pain of being stretched, but once it was tuned then it knew why it was stretched'. So it is with the human soul. While the soul goes through pain, torture and trouble it thinks that it would have been much better if it had gone through life without it. But once it reaches the culmination of it then, when it looks back, it begins to realize why all this was meant: it was only meant to tune the soul to a certain pitch.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_16.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Sep 05, 2019 06:11 am
Often those around us may not understand the plight of others and walk in other people's shoes. It is much more easier to misunderstand their behaviors if we are not real sensitive to Gods plan and the people he has put in our lives and their purpose for us.

Eric I am very thankful you have included this observation by Tagore;

Tagore says: 'When the string of the violin was being tuned it felt the pain of being stretched, but once it was tuned then it knew why it was stretched'. So it is with the human soul. While the soul goes through pain, torture and trouble it thinks that it would have been much better if it had gone through life without it. But once it reaches the culmination of it then, when it looks back, it begins to realize why all this was meant: it was only meant to tune the soul to a certain pitch.


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Sep 07, 2019 10:10 pm
One virtue is more powerful than a thousand vices.

Bowl of Saki, September 7, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Oct 26, 2019 06:46 am

   ~~~ True self-denial is losing one's self in God.


https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php
Quote

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Man, absorbed from morning till evening in his occupations which engage his every attention to the things of the earth and of self interest, remains intoxicated. Seldom there are moments in his life, brought about by pain or suffering, when he experiences a state of mind which can be called soberness. Hindus call this state of mind sat, which is a state of tranquility. Man then begins to become conscious of some part of his being which he finds to have almost covered his eyes. When we look at life from this point of view we find that an individual who claims to be a living being is not necessarily living a full life. It is only a realization of inner life which at every moment unveils the soul, and brings before man another aspect of life in which he finds fullness, a greater satisfaction, and a rest which gives true peace.

Can he speak about this to his fellow men? And if he does, what can he say? Can he say, 'I am purer,' or 'more exalted than you' or 'I understand life better than you?' As life unfolds itself to man the first lesson it teaches is humility; the first thing that comes to man's vision is his own limitedness. The vaster God appears to him, the smaller he finds himself. This goes on and on until the moment comes when he loses himself in the vision of God. In terms of the Sufis this is called fana, and it is this process that was taught by Christ under the name of self-denial. Often man interprets this teaching wrongly and considers renunciation as self-denial. He thinks that the teaching is to renounce all that is in the world. But although that is a way and an important step which leads to true self-denial, the self-denial meant is the losing oneself in God.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm



Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 15, 2019 08:08 pm
 Commentary by Hazrat Inayat Khan
Quote

What a great thing is understanding! It is priceless. No man can give greater pleasure to his fellow man than by understanding him.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm
Quote

If there is no understanding between two persons, words are of no use. They may talk and talk, and discuss and discuss, and it will only go from bad to worse, for argument will never end. As it is said in the Vadan, 'Why? Is an animal with a thousand tails. At every bite you give it, it drops one of its curved tails and raises another.' Can argument bring about understanding? Never. Argument only increases argument, and so one can go on till two persons turn their back upon one another. Understanding is a gift of God, understanding is a soul's unfoldment, and understanding is the greatest fortune one can have in life.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_38.htm



   ~~~ Wisdom is not in words, it is in understanding.



For your contemplation,
... A life without such understanding is like a dark room which contains everything you wish -- it is all there, but there is no light.

   ~~~ "Gathekas for Candidates 16, Sufi Mysticism ", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


Title: The Master IS, All Ways Present
Post by: tides2dust on Nov 16, 2019 05:50 pm
Quote
But those who wait, may wait. It is their destiny to wait, and one cannot help them. They waited while Jesus Christ came and went, and they still wait and will wait for ever. And yet he has always come; to the individual, to the multitude, to the nation, to the race. He came, and spoke to the whole world; but did he come with drums and trumpets? No, he came in the humblest guise, in the most unassuming manner; as our brother, our servant, our friend, our equal. Man, because of his devotion, has called him Lord; but he said, 'Call me not good. I am like unto you.' It is not his absence that keeps man in ignorance; it is man's own closed eyes. The Master has always been present, but man knew him not.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_29.htm


Title: Re: The Bowl of Saki
Post by: Steve Hydonus on Nov 19, 2019 05:02 am
The lover of nature is the true worshipper of God.

     Bowl of Saki, August 13, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Quote
Anyone who has some knowledge of mysticism and of the lives of the mystics knows that what always attracts the mystic most is nature. Nature is his bread and wine. Nature is his soul's nourishment. Nature inspires him, uplifts him and gives him the solitude for which his soul continually longs. Every soul born with a mystical tendency is constantly drawn towards nature; in nature that soul finds its life's demand, as it is said in the Vadan, 'Art is dear to my heart, but nature is near to my soul'. ... Nature does not teach the glory of God; it need not teach this as nature itself is the glory of God. People wish to study astrology and other subjects in order to understand better, but if we study astrology then we are sure to arrive at an interpretation which is given by a man, whereas what we should read from nature is what nature gives us and not what any book teaches us.

There comes a time with the maturity of the soul when every thing and every being begins to reveal its nature to us. We do not need to read their lives. We do not need to read their theories. We know then that this wide nature in its four aspects is ever-revealing and that one can always communicate with it, but that in spite of this it is not the privilege of every soul to read it. Many souls remain blind with open eyes. They are in heaven, but not allowed to look at heaven; they are in paradise, but not allowed to enjoy the beauties of paradise. It is just like a person sleeping on a pile of gems and jewels. From the moment man's eyes open and he begins to read the book of nature he begins to live; and he continues to live forever.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_7.htm

So it is with our practices, to seek God and to find him in All things.

Quote
A true worshipper of God sees His presence in all forms, and thus in respecting others he respects God. It may even develop to such an extent that the true worshipper of God, the Omnipresent, walks gently on the earth, bowing in his heart even to every tree and plant, and it is then that the worshipper forms a communion with the Divine Beloved at all times, when he is awake and when he is asleep.

   from  https://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_15.htm

I had mixed feelings about this quote as you may suspect Eric; while I completely agree to your quotes about nature I also see that astrology and the stars are also part of nature and therefore also the glory of God. And, just as we read someone elseís interpretation of Indian Totems to understand the significance of nature in human affairs we also may read the information available of the stars in human affairs. This by no means should hinder our own observation, and appreciation of what we witness. Nor should my reading the above quotes somehow diminish my own appreciation of nature but only add to it thru the eyes of someone else. I say let us learn from our differences as we share are similarities.