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The Bowl of Saki


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Steve Hydonus
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« Reply #90 on: Jul 20, 2014 10:54 am »

Quote
Everybody has an ideal in life, and that ideal is the religion of his soul


The soul's true happiness lies in experiencing the inner joy, and it will never be fully satisfied with outer, seeming pleasures. Its connection is with God, and nothing short of perfection will ever satisfy it.



Spiritually speaking we are always being 'tweaked' for me the biggest impediments are dry periods and challenging circumstances that seemingly rob our spiritual aspirations. Yet i have always heard these are tests along the way.
This is what makes a saint: They never gave up.
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« Reply #91 on: Dec 11, 2014 10:17 pm »

Bowl of Saki for December 11
    
When the artist loses himself in his art, then the art comes to life.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

One must not only be an artist; one must become art itself. Then to the one who is so absorbed in his work that he forgets himself, that capacity, that intuition, that skill will come naturally. He begins to do wonders, and his art becomes a perfect expression of what he had in mind. ...  People think that it is the artist who has made it; in reality, it is God who has perfected it. As it is God's pleasure to create the world, so it is also God's pleasure to create through pen and brush and chisel, to give life to what is lifeless.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_8.htm


The artist who has arrived at some perfection in his art, whatever his art may be, will come to realize that it is not he who ever achieved anything; it is someone else who came forward every time. And when the artist produces a perfect thing, he finds it difficult to imagine that it has been produced by him. He can do nothing but bow his head in humility before that unseen power and wisdom which takes his body, his heart, his brain, and his eyes as its instrument. Whenever beauty is produced in art, be it music, or poetry, or painting, or writing, or anything else, one must never think that man produced it. It is through man that God completes His creation. Thus there is nothing that is done in this world or in heaven that is not divine immanence, which is not divine creation. ...

What is art? Art is the creation of beauty in whatever form it is created. As long as an artist thinks that whatever he creates in the form of art is his own creation, and as long as he is vain about his creation, he has not learned true art. True art can only come on one condition, and that is that the artist forgets himself -- that he forgets himself in the vision of beauty. ... We are vehicles or instruments that respond. If we respond to goodness, goodness becomes our property. If we respond to evil, then evil becomes our property. If we respond to love, then love becomes our possession.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_3.htm



   ~~~ When the artist loses himself in his art, then the art comes to life.
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« Reply #92 on: Dec 11, 2014 10:51 pm »

Thank - You

What Hazrat Khan says about art here means a lot to me. It is an example of how are attitude should be in creating. i have never heard it said with so much humility..

..."And when the artist produces a perfect thing, he finds it difficult to imagine that it has been produced by him. He can do nothing but bow his head in humility before that unseen power and wisdom which takes his body, his heart, his brain, and his eyes as its instrument. Whenever beauty is produced in art, be it music, or poetry, or painting, or writing, or anything else, one must never think that man produced it. It is through man that God completes His creation."
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« Reply #93 on: Dec 31, 2014 06:23 pm »

...In all ages the various religions have given different standards of good and evil, calling them virtue and sin. The virtue of one nation has been the sin of another. The virtue of the latter is the sin of the former. Travel as we may through the world, or read the histories and traditions of nations as we may, we shall still find that what one calls evil, another calls good. That is why no one can succeed in making a universal standard for good and evil. The discrimination between good and evil is in man's soul. Every man can judge that for himself, because in every man is the sense of admiration of beauty. But he is not satisfied with what he does himself, he feels a discomfort, a disgust with his own efforts. There are many people who continue some weakness or some mistake, or who are intoxicated by some action which the world calls evil or which they themselves call evil, yet go on doing it. But a day comes when they also are disgusted. Then they wish for suicide. There is no more happiness for them. Happiness only lies in thinking or doing that which one considers beautiful. Such an act becomes a virtue or goodness. That goodness is beauty.

    

Happiness lies in thinking or doing that which one considers beautiful.

                        Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

What is really good? The answer is, there is no such thing as good or evil. There is beauty. That which is beautiful, we call good. That which is ugly compared with the beautiful, we call evil: whether it is custom, idea, thought or action. This shows that this whole phenomenon of the universe is the phenomenon of beauty. Every soul has an inclination to admire beauty, to seek for beauty, to love beauty, and to develop beauty. Even God loves beauty.

Man is always seeking for beauty, and yet he is unaware of the treasure of beauty that is hidden in his own heart. He strives after it throughout his whole life. It is as if he was in pursuit of the horizon: the further he proceeds, the further the horizon seems to have moved away. For there are two aims: the one is real, and the other false. That which is false is momentary, transitory, and unreliable - wealth, power, fame, and position are all snatched from one hand by the other. ... Man wants something in life upon which he can rely; and this shows, whether he believes in a deity or not, that he is constantly seeking for God. He seeks for Him not knowing that he is seeking for God. Nevertheless, every soul is pursuing some reality, something to hold on to; trying to grasp something which will prove dependable, a beauty that cannot change and that one can always look upon as one's own, a beauty that one feels will last forever. And where can one find it? Within one's own heart. And it is the art of finding that beauty, of developing, improving, and spreading that beauty through life, allowing it to manifest before the inner and outer view, which one calls the art of the mystic.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_4_3.htm
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« Reply #94 on: Jan 19, 2016 10:47 pm »

fast forward to tomorrows wisdoms for today  Grin

To treat every human being as a shrine of God is to fulfill all religion.

     Bowl of Saki, January 20, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
Where is the shrine of God? It is in the heart of man. As soon as one begins to consider the feelings of another, one begins to worship God. ... There is a story of a murshid who was going with his mureeds to visit some village, and he was keeping a fast. The mureeds also had taken a vow of fasting. They arrived at the peasants' home where there was great enthusiasm and happiness and where a dinner was arranged for them. When they were invited to the table, the murshid went and sat down; but the mureeds did not dare because they had taken a vow of fasting. Yet they would never mention it to the murshid. They thought, 'Murshid is forgetful; Murshid has forgotten the vow.' After dinner was over and they went out the pupils asked, 'Did you not forget the vow of fasting?' 'No,' was the murshid's answer, 'I had not forgotten. But I preferred breaking the fast rather than the heart of that man who with all his enthusiasm had prepared the food.'

The thirst for life makes us overlook little opportunities of doing good. Every moment of life brings an opportunity for being conscious of human feeling, in prosperity, in adversity, in all conditions. It costs very little; only a little thought is necessary. ... There is no greater religion than love. God is love; and the best form of love is to be conscientious regarding the feelings of those with whom we come in contact in everyday life.
        from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_13.htm

Quote
How beautiful are the words of the Prophet: 'The shrine of God is the heart of man.' How true that is! ... He who understands this can worship God even in man. For when he abides by this philosophy he will always be aware that in every aspect and at every moment he may be injuring or hurting the feelings of God, that he is in danger of breaking the shrine of God in breaking the heart of his fellow man. ... What does all this teach us? It is all a lesson in sympathy for one's fellow man, to teach us to share in his troubles, in his despair. For whoever really experiences this joy of life, finds that it becomes so great that it fills his heart and his soul. It does not matter if he has fewer comforts or an inferior position than many in this world, because the light of his kindness, of his sympathy, of the love that is growing, the virtue that is springing up in his heart, all fill the soul with light. There is nothing now that he lacks in life, for he has become the king of it.
          from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_1.htm
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« Reply #95 on: Mar 11, 2016 07:53 pm »


Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php




Well now... I do believe I've already shared this lovely insight from Hazrat Inayat Khan... Oh dear!

Perhaps I drink too heavily  Grin
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« Reply #96 on: Mar 15, 2016 06:04 am »


Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php




Well now... I do believe I've already shared this lovely insight from Hazrat Inayat Khan... Oh dear!

Perhaps I drink too heavily  Grin

Eric i found this to be an interesting quote: "So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves."

i believe many of us have glimpses of this in others. The difficulty arises when our glimpses do not correlate with the outer conformation. This is somewhat confusing and i have not come to terms with it yet... perhaps i will though. When Amma 'sees' those she blesses she sees that part of them that is God she is able to look beyond the rest. Can you imagine that? To actually see God in others and not what most people see in their brothers and sisters in the world. How can we cultivate that kind of love? It is part of a higher consciousness to want to see more of what i have had glimpses of in others i have known and met.

And this quote; "When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are."

Today i practiced music with a woman who is a true poet. Her vibration still lingers on within in me. It is as though we feel the presence of people who emanate something profound. It surrounds us and seeps into us as well.
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« Reply #97 on: Mar 30, 2016 10:56 pm »

This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"
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« Reply #98 on: Mar 31, 2016 12:43 am »

This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"


While i have been inspired by much of the Sufis posts... There are obviously some differences of view Eric. i must say that if it was not for the spiritual meditation techniques of the east i would still not find much pleasure in meditation. These techniques that were developed by the gurus have helped me interiorize and feel the presence of peace and at times joy and have exposed me to realms and miracles i honestly can say would not be possible with out their help. They were specifically given to Chelas (devotees) and there is help from those Masters and blessings in practice. i have indeed witnessed this help at Ammas and Yoganandas ashrams and in seeing them. i have evidence of the miracles assocaited with being in their presence and practicing their techniques.

Seeking the presence and finding the presence of God comes with the peace that is the first sign of Gods presence. i feel this peace associated with God's presence quite regularly. Deeper states of meditation... hearing the om...hearing the heavenly music... seeing the light and merging into a larger presence are all experiences associated with the gurus, Masters and meditation. Soon i will write what Amma had to say about having a Guru. i would be interested to know your response.

However i will end this statement with an important point. Every path for each individual is their own. i have no rite to question your views or your practices only to stand up for my own. We are grateful for your posts and your point of view Eric!

This video below can give you and idea of what it is like to meet or be in the presence of a great Spiritual Master and given His/Her blessings:

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« Reply #99 on: Mar 31, 2016 02:05 am »

This is taken from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan: The Sufi Teachings

found here: https://books.google.com/books?isbn=161310667X
"


does the sufi seek the presence of god? does he depend upon the meditation of any prophet or master? to this also the answer is no. he does not seek the presence of god, because where there is a presence there is duality, and his aim is unity. in unity there can be no presence. he does not seek to attach himself to any master for ever.

he has no wish to go to heaven, because he sees that heaven is everywhere.

once imagination has helped a man to bring the presence of god before him, god is awakened in his own heart. then before he utters a word it is heard by god; when he is praying in a room, he is not alone: he is there with god. to him god is not in the highest heaven, but beside him, before him, in him; then heaven is on earth and earth is heaven; then no one is as living to him as god, as intelligible to him as god, and the names and forms before his consciousness are all covered by him. then every word of prayer he utters is a living word.



"


This is significant. My understanding is that if a person can feel this, then they have no need of methods. If they don't feel this then methods are devised. As Steve said, it is entirely individual. I think mass instruction is a bit of a compromise.
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« Reply #100 on: Mar 31, 2016 07:47 pm »


We have really appreciated these inspirational talks from the Bowl of Saki. Occasional differing views are hopefully accepted. i have always hoped to accept them in others. Perhaps i voice them quite strongly sometimes though. Do u think that is the case? If Hazrat Inayat Khan was here now talking with us i have  a feeling that a man of that spiritual status would be receptive to other peoples spiritual values. He just seems unprejudiced in that sense. So that's something to think about!
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« Reply #101 on: Dec 05, 2016 09:29 pm »

hi steve,i think you're right. perhaps because from the spiritual views of others there is a recognizable truth shared among them.

   
Enviable is he who loveth and asketh no return.

       Bowl of Saki, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

A person is apt to think, 'Why should I perform actions that bring me no return? Why should I be kind, where no kindness is shown to me, where there is even no appreciation?' In this way he commercializes his kindness: he gives in order to receive. ... When one loves one must love for the sake of love, not for a return. When one serves one must serve for the sake of service, not for acknowledgement. In everything a person does, if he does not think of reciprocity or appreciation in any manner or form, he may perhaps seem a loser in the beginning, but in the end that person will be the gainer, for he has lived in the world and yet held himself above the world; it cannot touch him.

   http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_28.htm



   ~~~ Enviable is he who loveth and asketh no return.
https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php

sufism has existed before inayat khan, christianity, judaism or islam
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« Reply #102 on: Dec 06, 2016 02:14 am »

Reciprocity.

I have a comment Eric. i can agree on what he is saying accept for this word. We can easily find projects that are more meaningful if someone misuses us. For most of us we can also find people who are appreciative so there is really no use in giving to something that only goes down the drain. Let us think this one out a bit. We only have so many hours in a day. Why waste it on people who have little regard for others? It is best to put our energies where they can grow and we can really help others. Some people do not want our help nor do they even understand it. There are also those who we may spend time with who will willingly drain your energies, money and service with little or no regard for you. Eric you sell cars. I do not think you would continue your service without the reciprocity and acknowledgement of your service by being payed for your services. Your very survival depends on it. Is this 'commertializing' your services?

There have been people who have entered my life and who I spent a lot of time with that actually discouraged spiritual life. I really need to recognize that they have no intentions of meditating and would only discourage my efforts. I may enjoy their company but they have a lack of understanding of me and thus can show no reciprocity and actually discourage my spiritual efforts. Haven't you found this true also? When and if they call again I certainly will be friendly and give them a chance again, as I would like to be given, but to not listen to the voice of experience is to be knocked over the head over and over. So to spend very much time with them will only enable them to continue their lifestyle and stifle my own.

I will say this though... A Master has no need for reciprocity since he already has everything he could possibly want yet even as disciples we can help/support a Master's goals and projects here on earth. I wonder how others respond to my comments. Hazrat Inayat Khan has been a refreshing inspiration here at the portal. I may not agree or understand what he has said at various times. That does not take from the significance of his wisdom.
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« Reply #103 on: Dec 10, 2016 03:00 am »

hi steve,

i'm glad you find wisdom from these inspirational messages. cheers.
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« Reply #104 on: Dec 29, 2016 05:21 pm »

   
A gain or a loss which is momentary is not real; if we knew realities we should never grieve over the loss of anything that experience shows to be only transitory.

     Bowl of Saki, December 29, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
In life we discriminate between two things: the real and the false. We think more of the real and less of the false. We discriminate between imitation gold and real gold; we pay more for the real gold because it is more lasting. The two samples of gold may be equally bright; hence it is evident that the value we attach to things is in proportion to their lasting power. Similarly, if we could see what things in life are lasting or passing, we should discriminate between real loss and false loss, real gain and false gain. The gain or loss which is momentary is not real. So, too, joy or sorrow is a momentary state; the joy over a gain today may tomorrow prove to be a sorrow. If we knew the realities, we should never grieve over the loss of things which experience shows to be only of a transient character. ... For every gain, however, there is a need for sacrifice. To gain anything we have to sacrifice something; to pursue two gains is to lose both. Therefore it is necessary to decide once and for all what is false, and then to follow the real and leave the false.

If there is such a thing as saintly renunciation, it is renouncing small gains for better gains; not for no gains, but seeing with open eyes what is better and what is inferior. Even if the choice has to lie between two momentary gains, one of these would always be found to be more real and lasting; that is the one that should be followed for the time. When we take the torch of wisdom to show us our path through life, we will end by realizing what is really profitable in life and what is not.
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