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The Bowl of Saki


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« on: Oct 07, 2010 09:29 pm »

It is a very high stage on the path of love when a man really learns to love another with a love that asks no return.

     Bowl of Saki, October 7, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date_pic.php

Quote
Origins of "The Bowl of Saki" and the Daily Commentary


Background:

The title The Bowl of Saki was chosen around 1921 by students of Hazrat Inayat Khan who published a book containing some of the inspiring phrases that they had been given by their teacher. The first edition of The Bowl of Saki was published in England in late 1921 or early 1922.

The Bowl of Saki is a compendium of 366 brief quotations, one for each day of the year, selected from the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan. Many of the quotes came directly from his lectures, while others came from his personal notebooks. In the December 1921 edition of the quarterly publication "Sufism", the new book was announced as:

    "a collection of some of the most striking and arresting sayings of Pir-o-Murshid, arranged in the form of a daily textbook"

        from Complete Works of Pir-o-Murshid Hazrat Inayat Khan, Original Texts: Sayings, Part II


Quote
The Word Saki:

The Arabic word sāqī ساقی (also written as saqi or saki) literally means wine-server or wine-pourer and is frequently used in Persian poetry to describe the glorious Server who continually pours out the wine everlasting to all of mankind, while implying that only a completely empty bowl is truly ready to be filled with such a fine wine. For the Sufi, the greatest task of life is to become empty enough, selfless enough, to be a suitable receptacle for the wine which the Sāqī  pours.

In some cases, the word sāqī   may be used as a reference to a specific spiritual teacher, but in the grand scheme of things, a spiritual teacher is merely a worldly symbol for the presence of the Beloved, the One and Only One.

Some say that in order to be grammatically correct, the title should have been written as "The Bowl of the Sāqī," but frankly that title is rather clumsy and lacks poetry... so, perhaps the present title The Bowl of Saki was never intended to be grammatically correct, but may instead be a playful bit of British humor that intertwines the mystical Persian imagery with the thought of the oriental rice wine that has a similar sounding name. It is doubtful that we will ever know exactly how the book title The Bowl of Saki was created, but really the more important matter is to understand the deep significance of the word sāqī and of the bowl, which might also be called a cup, or chalice.
http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_origins.htm

The the term "The Bowl of Saki" is explained in a slightly different context in the following words of Hazrat Inayat Khan discussing the power of the mystical glance:

    Besides its precious work, which makes the eye superior to every other organ of the body, it is the expression of the beauty of body, mind and soul. Sufis, therefore, symbolize the eye by a cup of wine. Through the eyes, the secret hidden in man's heart is reflected into the heart of another. However much a person may try to conceal his secret, yet the reader can read it in his eyes, and can read there his pleasure, his displeasure, his joy, and his sorrow. A seer can see still farther. The seer can see the actual condition of man's soul through his eyes, his grade of evolution, his attitude in life, his outlook on life, and his condition, both hidden and manifest. Besides, to the passive soul of a disciple, knowledge, ecstasy, spiritual joy, and divine peace, all are given through the glance. One sees in everyday life that a person who is laughing in his mind with his lips closed can express his laughter through his glance, and the one who receives the glance at once catches the infectious mirth. Often the same happens through looking in the eyes of the sorrowful, in a moment one becomes filled with depression. And those whose secret is God, whose contemplation is the perfection of beauty, whose joy is endless in the realization of everlasting life, and from whose heart the spring of love is ever flowing, it is most appropriate that their glance should be called, symbolically, the Bowl of Saki, the Bowl of the Wine-Giver.

             from The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan, Volume XIII, Naqshi Bandi, The Glance





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« Reply #1 on: Oct 12, 2010 10:38 pm »

Seek Him in all souls, good or bad, wise and foolish, attractive and unattractive; in the depths of each there is God.


Bowl of Saki, October 12, by Hazrat Inayat Khan



Quote
As fruit ripens in the course of nature, so it is in the course of nature that the soul should mature; and it is no use being disappointed or disheartened about ourselves and about those near and dear to us, worrying because our husband, ...wife, father, or mother does not look at spiritual matters in the same way as we do. In the first place no man, however wise or pious, has the right to judge another soul. Who knows what is hidden behind every action, appearance, speech, and manner? No one. And when a person begins to know what is hidden in the human soul, in spite of all deluding appearances he will have respect, a respect for mankind, as he realizes that in the depth of every soul is He whom one worships.

Quote
Man swimming in the sea does not know the fish living in the sea, so we living in God do not recognize all souls living in God also. He is all around and about us at every moment, we are living His life, we are breathing His breath, and yet we are ignorant of the perfection of beauty which unites and inspires every soul.

 Smiley
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« Reply #2 on: Oct 17, 2010 11:57 pm »

Mysticism to the mystic is both science and religion.

     Bowl of Saki, October 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
What we generally know as the breath is that little inhaling and exhaling which we feel through the nostrils. We think that is breath and attach little importance to it, while in reality, breath is a life-current running through the innermost part of man's being towards the surface. It would be no exaggeration, according to the mystical point of view, to say that the breath connects heaven and earth. ...

For the mystic, breath is not only a science, but the knowledge of breath is mysticism, and mysticism to the thinker is both science and religion. The mystery of breath is not a thing that can be comprehended by the brain only. The principles of mysticism rise from the heart of man. They are learned by intuition and proved by reason. ...

If we consider the conditions of life today, we see that, however much man thinks he has progressed, certain aspects of life are neglected in the way of health, repose, balanced thinking, and in the way of kindness and love to one another. All these things are lacking, and the spirit of the present time seems to be going in quite the opposite direction.

Selfishness seems to be so much on the increase. Real religion, the spirit of forgiveness, generous giving, regard for old age, refinement, culture -- all seem to be disappearing. Man in general, does not know even if there is a God or Truth. If this is the spirit, how can we expect to find that harmony, peace and love, which make heaven on earth?

It is useless to discuss the peace of the world. What is necessary just now is to create peace in ourselves that we, ourselves, become examples of love, harmony and peace. That is the only way of saving the world and ourselves.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_1_17.htm
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 26, 2010 09:36 pm »

Love is unlimited, but it needs scope to expand and rise; without that scope, life is unhappy.
     Bowl of Saki, December 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote

A person who lives in happy surroundings with luxuries and sources of pleasure and comfort, may be envied and imagined to be a very happy and lucky man. In reality, however, he may be very unhappy. The external world has given him all he wished for, but the inner world, the inner being, is unhappy. There is something absent, and he wants it to be present. There is something missing inwardly. This shows that the inner presence is required. The external presence is not the only comfort.
 
But we may ask, the inner presence of what? Many will say, 'We know we are unhappy sometimes in spite of wealth, comfort, happiness, friends, or beloved.' But, perhaps they will not believe that it is another lack, the lack of a divine ideal that makes them unhappy. Others consider that life requires scope for progress, and that it is the lack of scope that causes the greatest unhappiness. Such persons think that they cannot prosper in the work that they are doing, that they cannot be any better off than the others. Such a thought is worse than death. Life is unlimited, and it wants scope to expand and rise. Without that scope life is unhappy.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_31.htm
 
 
Every kind of power lies in this one thing which we call by the simple name: love. Charity, generosity, kindness, affection, endurance, tolerance, and patience -- all these words are different aspects of one; they are different names of only one thing: love. Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own. Love as kindness is one thing, love as tolerance is another, love as generosity is another, love as patience another; and yet from beginning to end it is just love. ... True love must have free flow; and to learn that free flow the teachers have taught us first to love from the limited, and thence to advance in love till we attain to the love of God, the Unlimited.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm

 Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 26, 2010 10:21 pm »

Love is unlimited, but it needs scope to expand and rise; without that scope, life is unhappy.
     Bowl of Saki, December 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
 
Quote
Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
 
A person who lives in happy surroundings with luxuries and sources of pleasure and comfort, may be envied and imagined to be a very happy and lucky man. In reality, however, he may be very unhappy. The external world has given him all he wished for, but the inner world, the inner being, is unhappy. There is something absent, and he wants it to be present. There is something missing inwardly. This shows that the inner presence is required. The external presence is not the only comfort.
 
But we may ask, the inner presence of what? Many will say, 'We know we are unhappy sometimes in spite of wealth, comfort, happiness, friends, or beloved.' But, perhaps they will not believe that it is another lack, the lack of a divine ideal that makes them unhappy. Others consider that life requires scope for progress, and that it is the lack of scope that causes the greatest unhappiness. Such persons think that they cannot prosper in the work that they are doing, that they cannot be any better off than the others. Such a thought is worse than death. Life is unlimited, and it wants scope to expand and rise. Without that scope life is unhappy.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_31.htm
 
 
Every kind of power lies in this one thing which we call by the simple name: love. Charity, generosity, kindness, affection, endurance, tolerance, and patience -- all these words are different aspects of one; they are different names of only one thing: love. Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own. Love as kindness is one thing, love as tolerance is another, love as generosity is another, love as patience another; and yet from beginning to end it is just love. ... True love must have free flow; and to learn that free flow the teachers have taught us first to love from the limited, and thence to advance in love till we attain to the love of God, the Unlimited.
 
   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_9.htm
Smiley


I found these entries very helpful to me and some friends. i hope to find time to read the link as well. Thanks for highlighting the link.

In particular this quote makes me respond: Whether it is said, 'God is love,' or whatever name is given to it, all the names are the names of God; and yet every form of love, every name for love, has its own peculiar scope, has a peculiarity of its own.
When we are on this path towards love we see that every other path, whether slow or fast as it may seem, is a path to that love. It is much better to be conscious of the path we are taking and to find the fastest route for our aspirations. The only way that i know to gauge this is to assess the people, situations and circumstances that come into our lives and the long term affects on our consciousness to express the love we have gained through these conditions. That which is inimical to this process is what we should avoid as much as possible.

Jitendra
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"in the state of wonderment"


« Reply #5 on: Jan 04, 2011 08:42 am »

always thought Saki was a drink, rice wine perhaps ?   Cool

got it now ! drink the wine of wisdom

all we need is love, love, love
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 06, 2011 12:13 am »

   

No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.


     Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan
Quote
There is a [Hadith] which says: Mutu kubla anta mutu, which means, 'Die before death.' A poet says, 'Only he attains to the peace of the Lord who loses himself.' God said to Moses, 'No man shall see me and live.' To see God we must be non-existent.

What does all this mean? It means that when we see our being with open eyes, we see that there are two aspects to our being: the false and the true. The false life is that of the body and mind, which only exists as long as the life is within. In the absence of that life the body cannot go on. We mistake the true life for the false, and the false for the true.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_26.htm


As life unfolds itself to man the first lesson it teaches is humility; the first thing that comes to man's vision is his own limitedness. The vaster God appears to him, the smaller he finds himself. This goes on and on until the moment comes when he loses himself in the vision of God. In terms of the Sufis this is called fana, and it is this process that was taught by Christ under the name of self-denial. Often man interprets this teaching wrongly and considers renunciation as self-denial. He thinks that the teaching is to renounce all that is in the world. But although that is a way and an important step which leads to true self-denial, the self-denial meant is the losing oneself in God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


The first lesson of the mystic is, "Thou art, and not I." It is not only complete surrender to God, it is self-effacement. And what does the symbol of the cross explain? That "Thou art, not me, my hands are not for me, my feet are not for me, my head is not for me, they are all Thine." The saying of the [Hadith], "Die before death," does not mean suicide, it means the death of the "I", the separate self.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Mysticism VI", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)


http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
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« Reply #7 on: Jan 06, 2011 09:07 pm »

   

No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.


     Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan


Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
There is a [Hadith] which says: Mutu kubla anta mutu, which means, 'Die before death.' A poet says, 'Only he attains to the peace of the Lord who loses himself.' God said to Moses, 'No man shall see me and live.' To see God we must be non-existent.

What does all this mean? It means that when we see our being with open eyes, we see that there are two aspects to our being: the false and the true. The false life is that of the body and mind, which only exists as long as the life is within. In the absence of that life the body cannot go on. We mistake the true life for the false, and the false for the true.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_26.htm


As life unfolds itself to man the first lesson it teaches is humility; the first thing that comes to man's vision is his own limitedness. The vaster God appears to him, the smaller he finds himself. This goes on and on until the moment comes when he loses himself in the vision of God. In terms of the Sufis this is called fana, and it is this process that was taught by Christ under the name of self-denial. Often man interprets this teaching wrongly and considers renunciation as self-denial. He thinks that the teaching is to renounce all that is in the world. But although that is a way and an important step which leads to true self-denial, the self-denial meant is the losing oneself in God.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_7.htm


The first lesson of the mystic is, "Thou art, and not I." It is not only complete surrender to God, it is self-effacement. And what does the symbol of the cross explain? That "Thou art, not me, my hands are not for me, my feet are not for me, my head is not for me, they are all Thine." The saying of the [Hadith], "Die before death," does not mean suicide, it means the death of the "I", the separate self.

   ~~~ "Supplementary Papers, Mysticism VI", by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php

Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan inspires non verbal communication and solitude; finding that peace within.

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« Reply #8 on: Jan 08, 2011 03:44 am »

No one has seen God and lived. To see God we must be non-existent.

Bowl of Saki, January 5, by Hazrat Inayat Khan[/i]


Timeless!
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« Reply #9 on: Mar 12, 2011 09:21 am »

Man sees what he sees; beyond it he cannot see.

     Bowl of Saki, March 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Quote
When an ordinary or an illiterate person meets a poet, he sees the man-part and not the poet-part. But if he is told that this person is a poet he may see the poet-part when he meets him. He now sees that he is a poet in his actions and in his words; in everything about him he sees the poet, whereas otherwise he would not have been able to see this. Thus a great poet may go among a crowd and the people will only see the man in him; they do not see the poet, and they do not know how profound his thoughts are. So once a person begins to recognize God in man he does not see the man any more but God. The man is the surface, while God is deep within him. Such recognition brings a person into touch with everyone's innermost being, and then he knows more about people than they know themselves. ...



Divine perfection is perfection in all powers and mysteries. All these are manifested without specially striving for them. Perfection and annihilation is that stage where there is no longer 'I' and no longer 'you', where there is what there is.

 from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_12.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
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« Reply #10 on: Mar 26, 2011 09:34 pm »

Man is closer to God than the fishes are to the ocean.

     Bowl of Saki, March 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan



Quote
One day Inayat was praying on the roof of the house, offering his prayers and he thought to himself that there had not been an answer yet to all the prayers he had offered to God and he did not know where God was to hear his prayers and he could not reconcile himself to going on praying to the God whom he knew not. He went fearlessly to his father and said: "I do not think I will continue my prayers any longer, for it does not fit in with my reason. I do not know how I can go on praying to a God I do not know." His father, taken aback, did not become cross lest he might turn Inayat's beliefs sour by forcing them upon him without satisfying his reason and he was glad on the other hand to see that, although it was irreverent on the child's part, yet it was frank, and he knew that the lad really hungered after Truth and was ready to learn now, what many could not learn in their whole life.

He said to him: "God is in you and you are in God. As the bubble is in the ocean and the bubble is a part of the ocean and yet not separate from the ocean. For a moment it has appeared as a bubble, then it will return to that from which it has risen. So is the relation between man and God. The Prophet has said that God is closer to you than the jugular vein, which in reality means that your own body is farther from you than God is. If this be rightly interpreted, it will mean that God is the very depth of your own being." This moment to Inayat was his very great initiation, as if a switch had turned in him, and from that moment onward his whole life Inayat busied himself, and his whole being became engaged in witnessing in life what he knew and believed, by this one great Truth.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/bio/Biography_9.htm


The innermost being of man is the real being of God; man is always linked with God. If he could only realize it, it is by finding harmony in his own soul that he finds communion with God. All meditation and contemplation are taught with this purpose: to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light. In that way we are even closer to God than the fishes are to the ocean in which they have their being.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_1.htm
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"in the state of wonderment"


« Reply #11 on: Mar 26, 2011 09:39 pm »

hey little1 !  Cool

thanx for sharing the Bowl of Saki writings !
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« Reply #12 on: Mar 26, 2011 10:21 pm »

thank you ((( little1 ))) for sharing with us  Smiley
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« Reply #13 on: Mar 27, 2011 05:04 am »

by Hazrat Inayat Khan

The innermost being of man is the real being of God; man is always linked with God. If he could only realize it, it is by finding harmony in his own soul that he finds communion with God. All meditation and contemplation are taught with this purpose: to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light.

Thanks for the contribution Eric. Every once in a while i get these glimpses but that is the goal; 'to harmonize one's innermost being with God, so that He is seeing, hearing, thinking through us, and our being is a ray of His light.'
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« Reply #14 on: Apr 04, 2011 03:10 am »

Life is a misery for the man absorbed in himself.

     Bowl of Saki, April 3, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan

Quote
The more living the heart, the more sensitive it is; but that which causes sensitiveness is the love-element in the heart, and love is God. The person whose heart is not sensitive is without feeling; his heart is not living, it is dead. In that case the divine Spirit is buried in his heart. A person who is always concerned with his own feelings is so absorbed in himself that he has no time to think of another. His whole attention is taken up with his own feelings. He pities himself, he worries about his own pain, and is never open to sympathize with others. He who takes notice of the feelings of another person with whom he comes in contact, practices the first essential moral of Sufism.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_3.htm


A person who, alone, has seen something beautiful, who has heard something harmonious, who has tasted something delicious, who has smelt something fragrant, may have enjoyed it, but not completely. The complete joy is in sharing one's joy with others. For the selfish one who enjoys himself and does not care for others, whether he enjoys things of the earth or things of heaven, his enjoyment is not complete.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/IX/IX_29.htm


When a person is absorbed in himself, he has no time for character-building, because he has no time to think of others: then there is no other. But when he forgets himself, he has time to look here and there, to collect what is good and beautiful, and to add it naturally to his character. So the character is built. One need not make an effort to build it, one has only to forget oneself.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_2.htm


Every step in evolution makes life more valuable. The more evolved you are, the more priceless is every moment; it becomes an opportunity for you to do good to others, to serve others, to give love to others, to be gentle to others, to give your sympathy to souls who are longing and hungering for it. Life is miserable when a person is absorbed in himself; as soon as he forgets himself he is happy. The more he thinks of himself, his own affairs, work and interests, the less he knows the meaning of life. When a person looks at another he cannot at the same time look at himself. Illness, disappointments and hardships matter very little when one can look at them from a higher standpoint.

   from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VIII/VIII_2_1.htm

http://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_date.php
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